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Saturday Lecture Series: Frank Lloyd Wright’s ‘Fallingwater’

by coldwarrior ( 97 Comments › )
Filed under Academia, Art, Open thread, saturday lecture series at September 25th, 2010 - 8:30 am

This morning we are going to visit the Frank Lloyd Wright designed Fallingwater (1935).  I have visited there in the fall with the leaves changing, it is stunning.  So grab a cup of coffee and lest take a trip, 50 miles south east of Pittsburgh, PA and enjoy some architecture.

The House’s website

The Wiki website, looks accurate.

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97 Responses to “Saturday Lecture Series: Frank Lloyd Wright’s ‘Fallingwater’”
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  1. Bumr50
    1 | September 25, 2010 8:37 am

    I haven’t been there in a while, but it seems like they’re doing a number of things to reinforce the structure which is great.

    I’ve often wondered about the effects of erosion on the foundation, given it’s location.

    I remember remarking how tiny everything seemed compared to modern architecture.


  2. Bumr50
    2 | September 25, 2010 9:03 am

    It would seem that the previous decade of stagnant opportunity for Wright allowed the creative genius within him to build to the boiling point, and he was approached by Kaufman at just the right time to unleash it.

    It mentions on the website that the first drawings were essentially the last, and were conceived in a blink (in architectural time.)


  3. 3 | September 25, 2010 9:09 am

    Bumr50 wrote:

    I haven’t been there in a while, but it seems like they’re doing a number of things to reinforce the structure which is great.
    I’ve often wondered about the effects of erosion on the foundation, given it’s location.
    I remember remarking how tiny everything seemed compared to modern architecture.

    Wright was a man of small physical stature, and often built things that way! :lol: Dunno for sure whether there is any connection.


  4. Bumr50
    4 | September 25, 2010 9:35 am

    @ 1389AD:

    Found this regarding another Wright structure, The Meyer May House in Grand Rapids, MI.

    Design it for a specific person. This is more than just user-centered design. It’s design that matters and fits the life of an individual. Mr. May was not a man of large stature, so Wright built the home around him. Standing at a very specific place in the living room to welcome guests, he would be framed by beautiful trimmed windows, and with the lower ceiling there, appear taller. Wright even went as far as to dictate places that family pictures could be placed. The main floor was designated for entertaining guests and the second floor for family life.


  5. Mike C.
    5 | September 25, 2010 9:40 am

    A few hours up the road from us and TGoP has mentioned wanting to visit there.

    The astounding thing is that she asked our ten year old grandson one day if he knew what “Falling Water” was -- and he did. I sure as hell didn’t know when I was ten.


  6. Bumr50
    6 | September 25, 2010 9:47 am

    @ Mike C.:

    Growing up in the area, we had several field trips there throughout my schooling.


  7. RIX
    7 | September 25, 2010 9:56 am

    Greetings & salutations & happy football Saturday.
    The influence of Frank Lloyd wright is all over the Chicago
    Area, paricularly in the Beverly Area & Oak Park.
    He did some really intersting stuff.
    Is that an understatement?


  8. Bumr50
    8 | September 25, 2010 9:59 am

    OT, but IMO important.

    The Department of Education announced this week that they are “on schedule to implement new regulations of the for-profit education sector dealing with gainful employment and 13 other issues to protect students and taxpayers.” The non-profit sector feels threatened; therefore allies in the Administration are trying to use the power of the federal government to provide non profit schools a competitive edge to slow the growth of for-profit institutions. For-profit institutions are the trend and they are becoming more popular.
    ————————————————————--
    The Department of Education has proposed a rule to “require proprietary institutions of higher education and postsecondary vocational institutions to provide prospective students with each eligible program’s graduation and job placement rates, and that colleges provide the Department with information that will allow determination of student debt levels and incomes after program completion.” Although this may sound reasonable, the next step is for the department to evaluate the eligibility of students in order to deny students access to student loans if they deem them unfit for the loan. The proposed regulations provide a massive new regulatory structure over what High School diplomas qualify as satisfactory and provides new regulations defining “satisfactory academic progress.” The bottom line is that these are complex new regulations intended to make it harder for the for-profit educational institutions to operate.

    If the DOE gets it’s way, there will be far less Frank Lloyd Wright’s coming from the USA.

    There see. I tied it in.


  9. Bumr50
    9 | September 25, 2010 10:06 am

    @ RIX:

    I highly recommend reading ‘The Devil in the White City’ by Erik Larson to anyone, especially Chicagoans.

    It’s an excellent chronicling of the 1893 World’s Fair, which goes into detail about it’s primary architect, Daniel Burnham ( At his death in 1912, Frank Lloyd Wright eulogized, “(Burnham) was not a creative architect, but he was a great man.”), along with the grisly murders of Dr. H.H. Holmes in intricate weaving of the two stories.


  10. 10 | September 25, 2010 10:07 am

    I am rarely covetous, however, Wright’s structures never fail to lead me astray.


  11. RIX
    11 | September 25, 2010 10:15 am

    Bumr50
    8 | September 25, 2010 09:59
    If the DOE gets it’s way, there will be far less Frank Lloyd Wright’s coming from the USA.

    There see. I tied it in.

    Good morning Bumr. let me tie this in, tenure for professors should go away. It is a relic of the Cold War & provides cover for many
    dysfunctional incomptents.
    the “Academic” from the University of Illinois that wrote the ridiculous article about the kids at a U of I cahanting USA being jingoist drunks , insensitive to Muslims no doubt has tenure.
    I have been to football games there and the I Block kids that he ridiulesas “Pampered, White kids” have lots of loans out.


  12. RIX
    12 | September 25, 2010 10:24 am

    Bumr50
    9 | September 25, 2010 10:06
    @ RIX:

    I highly recommend reading ‘The Devil in the White City’ by Erik Larson to anyone, especially Chicagoans.

    I read it, great book. What struck me is how cold blooded that the archiects were with each other.
    Also Doctor Holmes murdered more people than Jack the Ripper & they both were doing it at the same time.


  13. Bumr50
    13 | September 25, 2010 10:28 am

    @ RIX:

    I’ve wanted to visit Chicago ever since I read it, to get a feel of the area.


  14. Bumr50
    14 | September 25, 2010 10:30 am

    RIX wrote:

    Also Doctor Holmes murdered more people than Jack the Ripper & they both were doing it at the same time.

    There was a pretty good special on the Biography Channel just last night on Holmes.

    I’m sure that it will air again soon.


  15. RIX
    15 | September 25, 2010 10:43 am

    Bumr50 wrote:

    @ RIX:
    I’ve wanted to visit Chicago ever since I read it, to get a feel of the area.

    While the book was out, there was a theme bus our in Chicago.
    My wife took it with some gal pals.
    They went to all of the major sites that were in the book.


  16. chickadee
    16 | September 25, 2010 10:44 am

    Morning folks.
    Here’s the Guggenheim Museum:


  17. RIX
    17 | September 25, 2010 10:45 am

    @ Bumr50:

    I would like to see that special on Biography.
    BTW wasn’t it Louis Sullivan who fired frank Lloyd Wright?
    I would hate that on my resume.


  18. Macker
    18 | September 25, 2010 10:45 am

    Bumr50 wrote:

    @ RIX:

    I’ve wanted to visit Chicago ever since I read it, to get a feel of the area.

    If you don’t mind 10,000 CCTV cameras keeping a “benevolent” eye on your every move, then you won’t mind the Windy City.


  19. Macker
    19 | September 25, 2010 10:46 am

    @ Bumr50:

    They actually said murdered?


  20. Macker
    20 | September 25, 2010 10:49 am

    @ RIX:

    Has anyone dropped a line to this jerk?


  21. snork
    21 | September 25, 2010 10:50 am

    John Kerry: Democrats’ woes stem from uninformed voters

    A testy U.S. Sen. John F. Kerry yesterday blamed clueless voters with short attention spans for the uphill battle beleaguered Democrats are facing against Republicans across the nation.

    “We have an electorate that doesn’t always pay that much attention to what’s going on so people are influenced by a simple slogan rather than the facts or the truth or what’s happening,” Kerry told reporters after touring the Boston Medical Center yesterday.

    You hear that, TFK? Your problem is that you’re just so friggin stupid.


  22. RIX
    22 | September 25, 2010 10:53 am

    Macker wrote:

    @ RIX:
    Has anyone dropped a line to this jerk?

    Oh yeah, it’s really got parents who send their tuition to the University of Illinois up in arms.
    Michael Medved had him on. There was an AirForce flyover Memorial
    Stadium to commemorate 9/11.
    This self-described academic called it a hate act toward Muslims. students.


  23. chickadee
    23 | September 25, 2010 10:55 am

    snork wrote:

    John Kerry: Democrats’ woes stem from uninformed voters

    A testy U.S. Sen. John F. Kerry yesterday blamed clueless voters with short attention spans for the uphill battle beleaguered Democrats are facing against Republicans across the nation.

    “We have an electorate that doesn’t always pay that much attention to what’s going on so people are influenced by a simple slogan rather than the facts or the truth or what’s happening,” Kerry told reporters after touring the Boston Medical Center yesterday.

    You hear that, TFK? Your problem is that you’re just so friggin stupid.

    Jon Cary is the most desperate gigolo in politics.


  24. chickadee
    24 | September 25, 2010 11:00 am

    Oh, and halp me jon cary i cain’t reed or rite to gud.

    You pompous fcking idiot.


  25. snowcrash
    25 | September 25, 2010 11:04 am

    @ chickadee:
    He needs to take his Edwardian style (must be so beautiful!) sail boat and go back to Pittsburgh where he belongs. He is a tax cheat, gigolo and elitist jerk. Oh yeah, good morning chicky. LOL


  26. RIX
    26 | September 25, 2010 11:04 am

    chickadee
    23 | September 25, 2010 10:55
    Jon Cary is the most desperate gigolo in politics.

    Let’s see, Kerry fabricated his war record & got outed by the Swifties.
    He also ran over to Paris to collaborate with the enemy.
    His testimony before the Fulbright Commission & Winter Soldier project were a pack of lies & half truths.
    Other than that, a really swell guy!/


  27. snowcrash
    27 | September 25, 2010 11:28 am

    On topic, DFW area has some architecturally important buildings but nothing on par with Fallingwater. My favs are The Meyerson Symphony Center in Dallas and the best imo is the Kimball Art Museum in Fort Worth. Have to make quick mention the Magnolia Hotel downtown Dallas, interesting history and home of the iconic neon Pegasus, the flying red horse of Magnolia/Mobil/Exxon oil logo fame.


  28. snowcrash
    28 | September 25, 2010 11:32 am

    So everyone is sleeping or busy and it is raining in Dallas. I had big yardwork plans for the day. Not going to happen. Blog is dead too. Ugh, off to get more coffee and develop a plan B.


  29. Beeduwine
    29 | September 25, 2010 11:37 am

    Falling water is fantastic, but check out some of his “paper projects” as well -- those that never left the drawing board. There are gems to be found.

    It’s a shame, I think, how Wright’s prarie style got cheapened and vulgarized in later years. If one would have managed to get a hold of the essence of what he was doing, the continuation could have been something wonderfull.


  30. Beeduwine
    30 | September 25, 2010 11:46 am

    @ snowcrash:

    Yeah, L. Kahn has done some beautiful stuff. Salk Institute was almost a religious experience.


  31. snowcrash
    31 | September 25, 2010 11:56 am

    @ Beeduwine:
    Hey, just went and googled. Wonderful pictures at greatbuilding.com I dont know anything about architecture except what looks good to me and fits the space. Seriously, the concrete thing can go bad really quickly but that was beautiful. Thanks.


  32. 32 | September 25, 2010 12:00 pm

    Beeduwine wrote:

    Salk Institute was almost a religious experience.

    Good grief man, I hope you don’t mean the Salk Institute in La Jolla California. (I worked there briefly while I was in college) It is one of the ugliest building on the face of the earth.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Salk_Institute1.jpg

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Salk_Institute2.jpg


  33. 33 | September 25, 2010 12:01 pm

    snowcrash wrote:

    @ Beeduwine:
    Hey, just went and googled. Wonderful pictures at greatbuilding.com I dont know anything about architecture except what looks good to me and fits the space. Seriously, the concrete thing can go bad really quickly but that was beautiful. Thanks.

    You two need to quit smoking crack, that building is not only ugly it is the very definition of sterile.


  34. Alberta Oil Peon
    34 | September 25, 2010 12:04 pm

    @ RIX:
    There was a thread on this jerk here a couple of nights ago. He’s not a tenured professor. More like a second under-assistant go-fer in the college library.

    Nevertheless, he sucks on the taxpayer’s teat.


  35. swamprat
    35 | September 25, 2010 12:05 pm

    @ doriangrey:

    It looks like a russian apartment building.


  36. Beeduwine
    36 | September 25, 2010 12:06 pm

    @ doriangrey:

    That’s the one. It is a brilliant building.


  37. The Osprey
    37 | September 25, 2010 12:06 pm

    Frank Lloyd Wright did a lot of work here in Arizona as well. Taliesin West, his design studio in Scottsdale is a popular tourist destination and an active design school.


  38. Macker
    38 | September 25, 2010 12:10 pm

    @ The Osprey:

    Good Morning! I take it you got my e-mail?


  39. snowcrash
    39 | September 25, 2010 12:11 pm

    @ doriangrey:
    Commie blocks? NO WAY! Dude I grew up in a housing project, I know commie blocks and graffiti magnets. You dont like the the way the window above the balcony is done in that picture? From a different angle that courtyard opens up to the Pacific.


  40. Beeduwine
    40 | September 25, 2010 12:12 pm

    @ doriangrey:

    No. You are turning being wrong into a sport here.

    Evaluation of architecture should transcend personal likes and dislikes.


  41. 41 | September 25, 2010 12:15 pm

    Beeduwine wrote:

    @ doriangrey:
    That’s the one. It is a brilliant building.

    No seriously, quit smoking crack, it’s easily the ugliest building on the face of the earth, it looks like the inspiration for it was a bunch of childrens building blocks that were knocked over.


  42. snowcrash
    42 | September 25, 2010 12:15 pm

    @ Beeduwine:
    I think we are doing the likes and dislikes thing here. LOL We are not professionals.


  43. 43 | September 25, 2010 12:17 pm

    snowcrash wrote:

    @ doriangrey:
    Commie blocks? NO WAY! Dude I grew up in a housing project, I know commie blocks and graffiti magnets. You dont like the the way the window above the balcony is done in that picture? From a different angle that courtyard opens up to the Pacific.

    Dude, I worked in that building, I know what it looks like inside and out. Ugly and sterile, it is straight cubism in three dimensions.


  44. Poteen
    44 | September 25, 2010 12:17 pm

    The building process as experienced by Poteen.

    Architect consults with owner to create beautiful series of renderings of their unique dream home. One that will make the neighbors envious and the architect famous.
    Drawings submitted to engineer for structural analysis. Engineer responds to architect “WTF are you thinking?” Changes are made.
    Plans submitted to building dept. plan check. Building dept. engineer returns plans heavily red-penciled with 4 pages of code corrections. Changes are made.
    Building contract awarded to general contractor. Home owner complains that building in progress doesn’t look like what he and architect originally drew and costs too much. Contractor informs homeowner that certain material substitutions and plan deletions will result in six-figure savings. Wholesale changes are made.
    Owner gets the home he paid for.
    Architect is still obscure. :)


  45. Macker
    45 | September 25, 2010 12:21 pm

    doriangrey wrote:

    Beeduwine wrote:

    Salk Institute was almost a religious experience.

    Good grief man, I hope you don’t mean the Salk Institute in La Jolla California. (I worked there briefly while I was in college) It is one of the ugliest building on the face of the earth.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Salk_Institute1.jpg

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Salk_Institute2.jpg

    Perhaps if it were on another…Colony…it might not be so bad.


  46. Beeduwine
    46 | September 25, 2010 12:21 pm

    @ snowcrash:

    Of course, emotions are part of the game. And ultimately, architecture is provoked emotions. But we cannot build houses or cities on emotions alone.


  47. Poteen
    47 | September 25, 2010 12:23 pm

    Some thing you may never see again. Obama 1 ACLU 0


  48. Beeduwine
    48 | September 25, 2010 12:24 pm

    @ Poteen:

    Heh. It is not always that bad. But sometimes. And that is when I fire the client.


  49. mfhorn
    49 | September 25, 2010 12:24 pm

    @ snork:

    “Dear Sen. Kerry,

    I realize you did serve in Vietnam, but I’m informed as to the issues, and that’s precisely why I oppose you, the Obamessia, and your extreme left-wing, big-government-will-take-care-of-you-from-cradle-to-grave agenda.

    Sincerely,

    mfhorn”


  50. 50 | September 25, 2010 12:25 pm

    Macker wrote:

    doriangrey wrote:
    Beeduwine wrote:
    Salk Institute was almost a religious experience.
    Good grief man, I hope you don’t mean the Salk Institute in La Jolla California. (I worked there briefly while I was in college) It is one of the ugliest building on the face of the earth.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Salk_Institute1.jpg
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Salk_Institute2.jpg

    Perhaps if it were on another…Colony…it might not be so bad.

    I’m pretty sure it is of Cylon design, it’s totally got that soulless utilitarian all function no form sterile feel to it.


  51. snowcrash
    51 | September 25, 2010 12:27 pm

    @ doriangrey:
    I would like to see it in real life. I like it. Is it the concrete? Do you like the Sydney Opera house?


  52. swamprat
    52 | September 25, 2010 12:29 pm

    @ doriangrey:

    beeduwine@ doriangrey:
    That’s the one. It is a brilliant building.

    “Brilliant” is right; the sun glaring off that thing would blind a welder.


  53. snowcrash
    53 | September 25, 2010 12:34 pm

    Ever the peacemaker, I will introduce the one thing that everyone (except Texans) loves to hate on, McMansion’s.


  54. 54 | September 25, 2010 12:37 pm

    snowcrash wrote:

    @ doriangrey:
    I would like to see it in real life. I like it. Is it the concrete? Do you like the Sydney Opera house?

    It’s not just the concrete, it’s the whole design, it literally looks like the structure is based on childrens building blocks. The Sydney Opera house is beautiful, that is an inspiring building, it genuinely captures the architect’s vision of a great sailing ship.


  55. Beeduwine
    55 | September 25, 2010 12:38 pm

    Anyway, architecture is a big world with many different landscapes. Once you delve into it, you learn to appreciate different approaches.

    It is not a surfacy black or white, right or wrong, good or bad, kind of world. And that is hard to fathom for some.


  56. Poteen
    56 | September 25, 2010 12:40 pm

    Beeduwine wrote:

    @ Poteen:
    Heh. It is not always that bad. But sometimes. And that is when I fire the client.

    These days it’s difficult to turn down any kind of work.


  57. Alberta Oil Peon
    57 | September 25, 2010 12:42 pm

    @ doriangrey:

    Gaaah! Put me down in the “it’s uglier than a can of crushed a$$holes” camp.


  58. 58 | September 25, 2010 12:42 pm

    snowcrash wrote:

    Ever the peacemaker, I will introduce the one thing that everyone (except Texans) loves to hate on, McMansion’s.

    I love McMansion’s, except for the shoddy construction part, but then again I have a tendency to hold views that oppose those of enviroNazi’s purely on principal so I would probably love the McMansion’s for that reason alone if it werent for my love of large rambling houses anyways.


  59. Macker
    59 | September 25, 2010 12:42 pm

    @ doriangrey:

    Hmmm…if you’re referring to the Original Series, I would agree. Modern-series Toasters (after the intervention by the Final Five) gravitated toward organic designs.


  60. Beeduwine
    60 | September 25, 2010 12:43 pm

    I have to go. Be back spater.


  61. swamprat
    61 | September 25, 2010 12:44 pm

    @ snowcrash:

    Wright did excellent work. He just didn’t do it on the Salk building. (in my eyes)

    But Salk tried to lessen maintenance and provide a practical living environment as well as to provide a pleasant looking structure.


  62. 62 | September 25, 2010 12:46 pm

    snowcrash wrote:

    @ doriangrey:
    I would like to see it in real life. I like it. Is it the concrete? Do you like the Sydney Opera house?

    It is a let down in real life and swamprat is also right, it the noonday La Jolla sun that building will practically blind you especially if like me you have blue eyes. Oh, and on the inside, it has the feel of an unfinished military concrete bunker hidden somewhere in old Soviet Russia.


  63. Beeduwine
    63 | September 25, 2010 12:47 pm

    @ Alberta Oil Peon:

    And the reason I have to run is I’m having guests from your province over.

    Dorian: read up on Kahn. It will do you wonders.


  64. Beeduwine
    64 | September 25, 2010 12:48 pm

    @ swamprat:

    ?

    Kahn!


  65. 65 | September 25, 2010 12:50 pm

    swamprat wrote:

    Wright did excellent work. He just didn’t do it on the Salk building. (in my eyes)

    Totally agree, just as speculation perhaps Wright was trying to capture the spiritual essence of pure scientific research when designing the Salk Institute, in which case he may very well have succeeded.


  66. swamprat
    66 | September 25, 2010 12:50 pm

    @ swamprat:

    ARRGH!

    But Salk WRIGHT tried to lessen maintenance and provide a practical living environment as well as to provide a pleasant looking structure.

    Shesh

    I remember his famous sermon:

    “NOT GOD BLESS PEOPLE WHO PAINT CONCRETE BUILDINGS! NO! GOD DA….”

    I need to get some breakfast now.


  67. 67 | September 25, 2010 12:52 pm

    swamprat wrote:

    “NOT GOD BLESS PEOPLE WHO PAINT CONCRETE BUILDINGS! NO! GOD DA….”

    ROTFLMAO……………………………. SOMEBODIES CHICKENS ARE COMING HOME TO ROOOOOSTTTTT.


  68. snowcrash
    68 | September 25, 2010 12:54 pm

    @ swamprat:
    The Salk building was by an architect named Louis Kahn, who did a beautiful IMO museum in Fort Worth. Beed has the design value thing going on, I just know what I like. It takes all kinds.


  69. Alberta Oil Peon
    69 | September 25, 2010 12:54 pm

    @ doriangrey:

    Yesterday, I had an appointment in Calgary. The main freeway into town from the north was at a standstill (due to ill-managed construction, natch), so I took a secondary road through a raft of new, and expensive subdivisions. It had been some time since I last took that route, and I marveled at all the hillsides and valleys studded with McMansions. Every roof the same height, every roof, and every wall seemingly the same color. And all packed as close together on the smallest lots the law will allow. The proportions are all wrong! A big house is a fine thing, but it needs to be on a big lot, with spacious grounds around it, not jammed in cheek-by-jowl with a thousand other virtually-identical houses.

    Pete Seeger, the old commie that he is, almost got it right when he sang about the “little boxes, all made of ticky-tacky.” It’s just the size he got wrong.


  70. 70 | September 25, 2010 12:58 pm

    FLW had an impact on AZ too. We even have a road named after him… Frank Lloyd Wright Blvd. It’s funny to me that no one abbreviates taht either. no one says FLW blvd like they do in Dallas with the LBJ freeway. it’s not a bad thing that they don’t abbreviate; i just find it curious that they don’t.


  71. mfhorn
    71 | September 25, 2010 12:59 pm

    @ Alberta Oil Peon:

    So many developments, not just the ‘McMansion’ ones, have the color problem, IMHO. All this ‘earth tone’ crap, everything these kind of dull, neutral shades of brown & beige. Sure, I understand you don’t want some colors, but that takes things way too far.


  72. 72 | September 25, 2010 1:02 pm

    @ mfhorn:

    Our house is done that way. We are currently choosing colors and painting. We did the diningroom in a bright crimson. It is quite the change for me. My last house was stark white everything. That is the way it came, ad I never had the inclination (or the money) to paint it until I refurbed it to sell. We went with a neutral cream color then :P


  73. snowcrash
    73 | September 25, 2010 1:05 pm

    @ Alberta Oil Peon:
    That is pretty much what the middle class wanted in the early 90′s. 2 story 4000 sq feet on a 6000sq foot lot for an inexpensive price. The next big thing has to be how to convert all these big houses into multi family. People get older and dont need or want all the space. The kids go off to school and half a house is unused and just a drain on utilities. Now there are no jobs and grown kids are returning home. There is plenty of space for them but the layout isnt right for privacy. Anyway, thinking for myself really.


  74. snowcrash
    74 | September 25, 2010 1:06 pm

    @ Kirly:
    KIRLY! Hey stranger.


  75. swamprat
    75 | September 25, 2010 1:07 pm

    @ snowcrash:

    Oh. Nevermind.

    It still has the wondrous beauty of a Russian concrete tenement.

    I am glad Wright didn’t commit this imposition upon the town of La Jolla.


  76. snowcrash
    76 | September 25, 2010 1:08 pm

    Here’s the deal, its all in the landscaping and that is my final word on McMansions.


  77. swamprat
    77 | September 25, 2010 1:09 pm

    @ mfhorn:

    S

    o many developments, not just the ‘McMansion’ ones, have the color problem, IMHO. All this ‘earth tone’ crap, everything these kind of dull, neutral shades of brown & beige. Sure, I understand you don’t want some colors, but that takes things way too far.

    Colors from the baby-shit spectrum.


  78. snowcrash
    78 | September 25, 2010 1:10 pm

    @ swamprat:
    Its like music. PhilipD posts all this classical stuff and I’m like WHAT? Everyone is listening to that? I dont get it. LOL Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.


  79. swamprat
    79 | September 25, 2010 1:11 pm

    @ snowcrash:

    true enough


  80. snowcrash
    80 | September 25, 2010 1:11 pm

    @ Iron Fist:
    That is interior design. Whole ‘nother area to go totally wrong in. LOL


  81. mfhorn
    81 | September 25, 2010 1:14 pm

    @ Iron Fist:

    Well, it’s not just on the inside, but the outside, too! I’ve got one room painted a very light blue. A nice change from the ‘apartment white’ I’d been stuck with for so many years!


  82. The Osprey
    82 | September 25, 2010 1:20 pm

    @ Alberta Oil Peon:

    We have that problem here in Phoenix. Tucson may be full of moonbats from UofA but at least they have the saving grace of better home design and mandatory xeriscaping (desert plants only on lawns). Most homes in Tucson are either 50′s ranch style or Santa Fe Spanish Colonial style (traditional or modern variation). Phoenix has too much of that gawdawful faux-Tuscan thing going on, and grass lawns and non-native plants imported by midwesterners.

    Hey peeps, it’s a DESERT!


  83. AZfederalist
    83 | September 25, 2010 1:24 pm

    Read several years ago that while Wright’s designs were artistically stunning, they often left ergonomics for the homeowner lacking. He also didn’t do so well as an architectural engineer. It’s not just the fact of location that is leading to much of the rework needed on Falling Water. There were some significant engineering errors that have caused structural problems in that building.

    Sorry I don’t have the cites, I think they were either in Fine Woodworking or Fine Homebuilding several years ago.


  84. The Osprey
    84 | September 25, 2010 1:25 pm

    Kirly wrote:

    FLW had an impact on AZ too. We even have a road named after him… Frank Lloyd Wright Blvd. It’s funny to me that no one abbreviates taht either. no one says FLW blvd like they do in Dallas with the LBJ freeway. it’s not a bad thing that they don’t abbreviate; i just find it curious that they don’t.

    I love that blue facetted spire thing on Frank Lloyd Wright Boulevard. It was originally part of a design of his for the AZ State Capitol that was deemed “too radical”. It reminds me of the cities on the Minbari homeworld on the sci-fi show Babylon 5.


  85. AZfederalist
    85 | September 25, 2010 1:29 pm

    The Osprey wrote:

    @ Alberta Oil Peon:

    We have that problem here in Phoenix. Tucson may be full of moonbats from UofA but at least they have the saving grace of better home design and mandatory xeriscaping (desert plants only on lawns). Most homes in Tucson are either 50′s ranch style or Santa Fe Spanish Colonial style (traditional or modern variation). Phoenix has too much of that gawdawful faux-Tuscan thing going on, and grass lawns and non-native plants imported by midwesterners.

    Hey peeps, it’s a DESERT!

    You want desert plants in the yards, you’re welcome to ‘em!. My impression when moving to Tucson was that all the neighborhoods looked like they were full of abandoned homes. The landscaping in Tucson looks like what homes where I grew up (Denver area) devolved to when they were abandoned.

    It may be a desert, but there’s nothing inherently wrong with making some of that desert bloom.


  86. 86 | September 25, 2010 1:29 pm

    snowcrash wrote:

    @ swamprat:
    Its like music. PhilipD posts all this classical stuff and I’m like WHAT? Everyone is listening to that? I dont get it. LOL Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

    Well to be fair, classical music was the Rock and Roll ,of the 17th century and Mozart, Back, Chopin ect. were the Rock Star’s of their era. Time progressed and peoples tastes changed, but more then anything what changed was the instrumentation.

    On a purely theoretical analysis classical music isn’t very different from hard rock/heavy metal, the most significant difference is the instrumentation.


  87. The Osprey
    87 | September 25, 2010 1:29 pm

    Here’s a better pic of it.


  88. 88 | September 25, 2010 1:32 pm

    AZfederalist wrote:

    It may be a desert, but there’s nothing inherently wrong with making some of that desert bloom.

    Sure there is, it’s called water, it wouldn’t be a desert if there were water there.


  89. snowcrash
    89 | September 25, 2010 1:34 pm

    @ doriangrey:
    Exactly.


  90. coldwarrior
    90 | September 25, 2010 1:36 pm

    new thread up…

    the ncaa football thread is up all day and is an open thread.


  91. snowcrash
    91 | September 25, 2010 1:37 pm

    @ The Osprey:
    So it was just taken and placed in a sculpture garden? Odd. Its an aloe plant. I dont know if I like it. Lemme think. What did the building it was going to go on look like?


  92. snowcrash
    92 | September 25, 2010 1:40 pm

    @ doriangrey:
    Xeriscaping. I dont want to talk about my plants and xeriscaping in the same comment box. It is wrong. LOL


  93. snowcrash
    93 | September 25, 2010 1:41 pm

    Talk to y’all later.


  94. AZfederalist
    94 | September 25, 2010 1:43 pm

    @ doriangrey:

    You’ll note I said, “making some of the desert bloom”, not all of it. One has to work within reason however. In the case of Tucson, it’s full tilt the other way. To the point of social engineering with water rates. The rates move from a reasonable $1.54 per 746 gallons up to the next step of $5.75 per 746 gallons after using a certain amount. In addition, there are all these other nice little “fees” that Tucson adds on to the water bill: a groundwater protection fee, a CAP (Central Arizona Project) fee — that’s part of getting Colorado River water, and then a “Conservation fee”.

    Letting governments run utilities is a bad idea — especially in a lib whacko area like Tucson. The government then uses the power of the state to make people behave as those in power wish them to behave, rather than providing a service and charging in accordance with what that service costs.


  95. The Osprey
    95 | September 25, 2010 2:17 pm

    snowcrash wrote:

    @ The Osprey:
    So it was just taken and placed in a sculpture garden? Odd. Its an aloe plant. I dont know if I like it. Lemme think. What did the building it was going to go on look like?

    Like this… the spire would have been on the top of that hexagonal pyramid structure.


  96. 96 | September 25, 2010 6:46 pm

    doriangrey wrote:

    Beeduwine wrote:
    @ doriangrey:
    That’s the one. It is a brilliant building.
    No seriously, quit smoking crack, it’s easily the ugliest building on the face of the earth, it looks like the inspiration for it was a bunch of childrens building blocks that were knocked over.

    It looks harsh and cheaply made, even if it wasn’t.


  97. 97 | September 25, 2010 6:54 pm

    Macker wrote:

    Bumr50 wrote:
    @ RIX:
    I’ve wanted to visit Chicago ever since I read it, to get a feel of the area.
    If you don’t mind 10,000 CCTV cameras keeping a “benevolent” eye on your every move, then you won’t mind the Windy City.

    Some people love the place.

    I don’t.

    I spent most of my adult life there. The people are, by and large, not very pleasant compared to those in other locales. The air is filthy. Traffic jams and parking problems are constant. The climate is way too cold most of the year. Everything costs too much, especially housing. The word “Chicago” stands for corruption, anywhere in the world you may happen to be -- and rightly so.

    There’s an old joke about how Chicago was founded. Seems a bunch of New Yorkers said, “We like the crime and corruption and poverty and squalor, but the climate here is too mild.” So they went west.

    Over five years ago, I left there, feeling so mentally, physically, emotionally, spiritually, and financially run down that at that point, eternal damnation would have seemed preferable.


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