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The Rise of the Mexican Middle Class

by Rodan ( 8 Comments › )
Filed under Economy, Headlines, Mexico at April 3rd, 2012 - 9:35 am

Despite the violence in Mexico, something is not being discussed. Its economy is actually growing and lifting many out of poverty. A new Mexican Middle class is now the majority of the nation. This is changing the political landscape and could in the long term change the dynamic of US-Mexican relations.

QUERETARO, Mexico — A wary but tenacious middle class is fast becoming the majority in Mexico, breaking down the rich-poor divide in a profound demographic transformation that has far-reaching implications here and in the United States.

Although many Mexicans and their neighbors to the north still imagine a country of downtrodden masses dominated by a wealthy elite, the swelling ranks of the middle class are crowding new Wal-Marts, driving Nissan sedans and maxing out their Banamex credit cards.

The members of this class are not worried about getting enough to eat. They’re worried that their kids are eating too much.

“As hard as it is for many of us to accept, Mexico is now a middle-class country, which means we don’t have any excuse anymore. We have to start acting like a middle-class country,” said Luis de la Calle, an economist, former undersecretary of trade in the Mexican government and the co-author of a new report called “Mexico: A Middle Class Society, Poor No More, Developed Not Yet.”

Hopefully this trend continues.

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8 Responses to “The Rise of the Mexican Middle Class”
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  1. 1 | April 3, 2012 9:56 am

    Karma will be fulfilled when Americans flood illegally across the Mexican Border seeking higher paying jobs in Mexico than can be obtained in America. :shock:


  2. 2 | April 3, 2012 10:02 am

    @ doriangrey:

    Imagine that.


  3. 3 | April 3, 2012 11:00 am

    If they’re “maxing out their Banamex credit cards”, they’re not middle class. They’re in the same class they were but now with more immediate spending money. At the end of it they’ll be broke and poor again, but this time in bonded servitude. Yay, progress.

    /this message brought to you by the year 2008


  4. 4 | April 3, 2012 11:08 am

    Sorry for being a buzzkill, but I’ve seen too often what happens when the Third World goes First World through easy credit and not anything more structural. . . I want to be assured that this boomlet is due to structural reforms.


  5. 5 | April 3, 2012 12:39 pm

    doriangrey wrote:

    Karma will be fulfilled when Americans flood illegally across the Mexican Border seeking higher paying jobs in Mexico than can be obtained in America.

    I’m surprised Gov. Brown hasn’t made this part of a jobs program for SoCal.


  6. 6 | April 3, 2012 4:02 pm

    Zimriel wrote:

    Sorry for being a buzzkill, but I’ve seen too often what happens when the Third World goes First World through easy credit and not anything more structural. . . I want to be assured that this boomlet is due to structural reforms.

    Except that that isn’t how Mexico’s Middle Class is driving Mexico towards First World Status. That statement about maxing out the Banamex cards was hyperbolic rhetoric employed as an allegorical metaphor to describe being “Middle Class”. Mexico’s Middle Class, much like America’s Middle class during the 40′s and 50′s has a very strong memory of being poor and as a consequence while they are spending a considerable amount of their new found wealth, they are not mortgaging their future to purchase this afternoon. They are saving and investing a fairly significant percentage of that newly found wealth.

    Sorry, can’t reassure you that it is due to structural reforms, because it isn’t. It is primarily due to the international advantages in Mexico’s regulatory and taxation structures that have lured manufacturers from all over the world to Mexico. Mexico didn’t alter it’s regulatory and taxation structures to attract businesses, those regulatory and taxation structures have been in place for nearly a hundred years. The rest of the First World Nations went batshit crazy and raised their during the 60′s and 70′s so that Mexico’s lower regulatory and taxation structures and it’s close proximity to America made Mexico the obvious choice to relocate to.

    The rise of Mexico’s middle class that is being seen today is the inescapable result of European and American socialist programs and ideologies that took place in the 60′s and 70′s. It is a process that has been slowly building for decades and only now becoming undeniably obvious. As a resident of San Diego California, I have literally watched it take place right in front of my very own eyes.


  7. 7 | April 3, 2012 4:31 pm

    @ doriangrey:

    As Americans we should applaud this. In the long term, this is the best way to end illegal immigration.


  8. 8 | April 3, 2012 11:04 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    @ doriangrey:
    As Americans we should applaud this. In the long term, this is the best way to end illegal immigration.

    Absolutely, being surrounded by healthy prosperous nations is in America’s best interests. Contrary to the delusions of some people it doesn’t make us smaller or diminish us in any way shape or form, but in fact projects and protects our national security and our own prosperity.


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