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Happy Thanksgiving Blogmockrateers!

by Bunk X ( 34 Comments › )
Filed under Blogmocracy, OOT, Open thread at November 22nd, 2012 - 10:00 pm

“When I was 5 years old, my mom always told me that happiness was the key to life. When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down ‘happy.’ They told me I didn’t understand the assignment and I told them they didn’t understand life.”

Quoted from here. It’s one of my favorites, especially on a modern-day rarity when family and friends get together to share their blessings and to reminisce about what was and what could have been, and then, to discuss what might be, on The Overnight Open Thread.

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34 Responses to “Happy Thanksgiving Blogmockrateers!”
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  1. Bumr50
    1 | November 22, 2012 10:37 pm

    Stuffed n’ stoned.

    Happy Thanksgiving, everybody!


  2. Calo
    2 | November 22, 2012 10:47 pm

    @ Bumr50:
    Now, why would you stuff a stone for Thanksgiving dinner?

    Turkeys are better equiped to be stuffed full of stuffing.


  3. Bumr50
    3 | November 22, 2012 10:52 pm

    Calo wrote:

    Now, why would you stuff a stone for Thanksgiving dinner?

    To get to the other side?


  4. Calo
    4 | November 22, 2012 10:56 pm

    @ Bumr50:
    Yes, that’s it! Like chickens we are tonight.

    I was afraid you were going to tell me to go smoke a duck instead.


  5. eaglesoars
    5 | November 22, 2012 11:35 pm

    One of the best presents I ever got was the complete collection of Calvin and Hobbes.

    It never fades, never gets ‘old’


  6. EBL
    6 | November 22, 2012 11:43 pm

    Mayor Bloomberg?


  7. Calo
    7 | November 22, 2012 11:59 pm

    @ EBL:
    Love the vintage Mickey float, but Ronald McDonald?

    Not so much.


  8. eaglesoars
    8 | November 23, 2012 12:05 am

    I’m watching The Kennedys on Reelz (Katie Holmes seems to nail Jackie Kennedy’s personna, btw). Anyway if JFK was as drugged as this piece says, it’s a wonder we aren’t all dead. No idea how he kept it together.


  9. Calo
    9 | November 23, 2012 12:09 am

    @ eaglesoars:
    IIRC, he was hooked on pain killers.
    Narcotics can act as a stimulant on certain brains. Much like cocaine or any other upper.


  10. eaglesoars
    10 | November 23, 2012 12:15 am

    Calo wrote:

    @ eaglesoars:
    IIRC, he was hooked on pain killers.
    Narcotics can act as a stimulant on certain brains. Much like cocaine or any other upper.

    Assuming the list of drugs he was taking as noted in the movie is accurate(and I have no way to evaluate that) -- please forgive me -- Oswald’s bullets were a blessing.

    I think there were about 12. And that was BEFORE ‘Dr Feelgood’ came into the picture. Apparently what he was dispensing was some sort of meth/stimulent. Which, if memory serves, has a lousy downside.


  11. Calo
    11 | November 23, 2012 12:20 am

    @ eaglesoars:
    Yes, if it wasn’t for Oswald, Camelot might have had an unhappy ending.


  12. Calo
    12 | November 23, 2012 12:23 am

    @ Calo:
    *a different unhappy ending*


  13. eaglesoars
    13 | November 23, 2012 12:48 am

    Calo wrote:

    @ Calo:
    *a different unhappy ending*

    Whatever unhappy ending, it has seemed to be unwinding all over our cultural landscape for a long time now. 50 years or so. One of the last families on the planet I would want to be born into


  14. 14 | November 23, 2012 1:13 am

    A great Thanksgiving (part 1) here today. Ham glazed with honey, brown sugar & maraschino cherry juice, mashed potatoes & rolls.

    Tomorrow- part 2 up in Topeka with Ms MF’s nurse friend. The one that saw I needed to see a doctor last Christmas. Fried turkey w/ all the sides.


  15. African Moondog
    16 | November 23, 2012 5:07 am

    eaglesoars wrote:

    Assuming the list of drugs he was taking as noted in the movie is accurate(and I have no way to evaluate that) — please forgive me — Oswald’s bullets were a blessing

    Many people have said that. JFK was also hooked on meth amphetamines given to him by a a fellow who was quite famous at the time who was essentially the quack to the stars. RFK discovered what the”medicine” was when he stole some from JFK’s portable pharmacy and sent it to the FBI lab for analysis. JFK was beginning to spin out of control and his second term would have been a disaster.


  16. waldensianspirit
    17 | November 23, 2012 7:09 am

    High tech meets the stone age


  17. Guggi
    18 | November 23, 2012 7:26 am

    And he does it again (via JWF) -- scroll down to:

    Smiles: Obama, fourth from left, is in Cambodia for the ASEAN-U.S. leaders’ meeting at the Peace Palace


  18. 19 | November 23, 2012 7:33 am

    Since last week, Saudi women’s male guardians began receiving text messages on their phones informing them when women under their custody leave the country, even if they are travelling together.

    Good Lord.

    Ya know, a women’s rights movement in the Middle East has the potential to bring down the whole sick culture.


  19. 20 | November 23, 2012 7:35 am

    @ MacDuff:

    When we lived in Qatar (88-93), my wife and/or daughters need my written permission to leave the country unless I was with them. There had to be an official document, or they weren’t going anywhere.


  20. 21 | November 23, 2012 7:36 am

    waldensianspirit wrote:

    High tech meets the stone age

    The comment above references this. I’m still under the influence of extreme feasting. :|


  21. 22 | November 23, 2012 7:37 am

    @ Mike C.:

    Er, “needed”, that is.


  22. Guggi
    23 | November 23, 2012 7:48 am

    The Media’s Benghazi Scandal

    Over my career, I’ve tended to resist press bashing. Part of the reason for that may be that there are plenty of journalists whose work I respect and whom I’ve come to admire. But I must say that the way the press as an institution covered the 2012 presidential election was in many respects depressing—and in some respects its biases have rarely been more fully on display.

    There are a dozen examples I could cite, but let me simply focus on one: The September 11 attack on the U.S. diplomatic facility in Benghazi. We witnessed a massive failure at three different stages. The first is that the U.S. ambassador to Libya, Christopher Stevens, and others asked for additional protection because of their fears of terrorist attacks. Those requests were denied—and Mr. Stevens became the first American ambassador to be murdered in more than 30 years, along with three others. The second failure was not assisting former Navy SEALS Tyrone Woods and Glen Doherty when they were under attack (both were killed). The third failure was that the administration misled the American people about the causes of the attack long after it was clear to many people that their narrative was false.

    Yet with a few honorable exceptions—Fox News being the most conspicuous—the press has shown no real appetite for this story. It’s not that it hasn’t been covered; it’s that the coverage has lacked anything like the intensity and passion that you would have seen had this occurred during the presidency of, say, Ronald Reagan or George W. Bush. I have the advantage of having worked in the Reagan administration during Iran-contra and the Bush White House during the Patrick Fitzgerald leak investigation—and there is simply no comparison when it comes to how the press treated these stories. The juxtaposition with the Fitzgerald investigation is particularly damning to the media. Journalists were obsessed by that story, which turned out to be much ado about nothing—Mr. Fitzgerald decided early on there were no grounds to prosecute Richard Armitage for the leak of Valerie Plame’s name—and obsessed in particular with destroying the life of the very good man who was the architect of George W. Bush’s two presidential victories (thankfully they failed in their effort to knee-cap Karl Rove).

    (…)


  23. 24 | November 23, 2012 7:49 am

    The Mrs. and I are going to see “Jersey Boys” this afternoon….front row, center at an exceptional venue.

    We’ve been looking forward to this for some time, it’s been getting consistently stellar reviews.


  24. 25 | November 23, 2012 8:38 am

    This link is for Dorian and others who were discussing ancient civilizations last night. It’s called Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings -- Piri Reis wasn’t the only one. I own this book -- it’s a very interesting study of a number of ancient maps. It’s absolutely fascinating showing that humans had knowledge of the planet long before modern times -- such as that the earth was a sphere and the ice-free coast of Antarctica. As you all likely know by now, I’m a Bible-believing Christian. Nothing theorized in Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings contradicts these beliefs -- unlike ancient aliens (I suggest investigating the credibility of those delivering that message and attempting to independently verify anything they say -- as I would of anything).

    http://www.amazon.com/Maps-Ancient-Sea-Kings-Civilization/dp/0932813429


  25. 26 | November 23, 2012 8:47 am

    @ Kirly:

    From one of the reviews…

    At first reading Charles Hapgood makes a good argument for a crustal shift theory 10,000 years ago. Certainly, something must have happened at that time, to cause such a sudden end to the, so called, ice age.

    Shoot me now…


  26. 27 | November 23, 2012 8:59 am

    Kirly wrote:

    such as that the earth was a sphere

    The greeks knew this and most ancients and medieval people knew this as well. The concept of past man thinking the world was flat is a myth created by 19th century pseudo intellectuals that were trying to make their civilization seem more advanced then the past ages.


  27. 28 | November 23, 2012 9:08 am

    @ Mike C.:
    i never read the reviews. but, i do own the book and it’s a scientific study of all known map fragments they could get their hands on. it’s very interesting.

    @ PaladinPhil:
    i know. amazing, isn’t it? how much knowledge ancient humans actually had.


  28. 29 | November 23, 2012 9:19 am

    @ Mike C.:

    ….and some of these people call us “anti-science”.


  29. Guggi
    30 | November 23, 2012 9:24 am

    Ancient Roman Industrial Watermills

    (now, tell me somethings about Muslim who invented watermills in Spain///)


  30. 31 | November 23, 2012 9:34 am

    @ Kirly:

    Mankind seems to have had Great leaps forward only to lose it all several times in our history. It makes one wonder what we would be like had we experienced constant progress. Of course, our technological progress and our civilizational progress seem to have travelled very different paths.


  31. buzzsawmonkey
    32 | November 23, 2012 10:16 am

    “Thanksgiving” at PJM.

    Comments invited.


  32. eaglesoars
    33 | November 23, 2012 10:58 am

    Kirly wrote:

    This link is for Dorian and others who were discussing ancient civilizations last night. It’s called Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings — Piri Reis wasn’t the only one. I own this book — it’s a very interesting study of a number of ancient maps. It’s absolutely fascinating showing that humans had knowledge of the planet long before modern times — such as that the earth was a sphere and the ice-free coast of Antarctica. As you all likely know by now, I’m a Bible-believing Christian. Nothing theorized in Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings contradicts these beliefs — unlike ancient aliens (I suggest investigating the credibility of those delivering that message and attempting to independently verify anything they say — as I would of anything).

    http://www.amazon.com/Maps-Ancient-Sea-Kings-Civilization/dp/0932813429

    Thank you!


  33. 34 | November 23, 2012 11:24 am

    @ eaglesoars:
    you’re very welcome. i can’t emphasize enough just how interesting that book is.


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