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ESPN admits Rob Parker’s RG3 comments were inappropriate – Update: ESPN suspends Rob Parker

by Speranza ( 52 Comments › )
Filed under Hate Speech, Media, NFL, Racism at December 13th, 2012 - 11:00 pm

I have no use for any one (black or white) who obsesses over whether someone is “authentically black”.

by Michael David Smith

Several hours after an ESPN commentator questioned whether Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III is authentically black, ESPN said those comments were out of line.

In a statement released by an ESPN spokesman, the network said, “The comments were inappropriate and we are evaluating our next steps.”

It will be interesting to see what those “next steps” are, and whether they lead to the commentator who made the comments, Rob Parker, to lose his job. When another ESPN commentator, Rush Limbaugh, made racially charged comments about another quarterback, Donovan McNabb, that ended up being the last day that Limbaugh appeared on ESPN’s NFL pregame show.

In Parker’s case, the comments would seem to be even further outside the bounds of what’s acceptable than Limbaugh’s claim that McNabb was overrated because the media wanted to promote a black quarterback. Parker went so far as to say that being engaged to a white woman somehow made Griffin “not really” black. That’s way, way outside the bounds of what’s generally considered an acceptable part of the discourse.

However, ESPN also has to shoulder plenty of the blame for Parker’s comments: The show Parker was appearing on, ESPN First Take, is specifically designed to provoke, and the comments from the show’s panelists, when they don’t flagrantly cross the line, frequently tiptoe right up next to the line. It’s also telling that ESPN later aired Parker’s comments on its Best of First Take afternoon show, suggesting that those are exactly the kinds of provocative comments that ESPN wants on First Take.

Furthermore, Parker’s comments didn’t just surface suddenly during a discussion of Griffin and the Redskins. They were part of a broader segment that began with quotes Griffin gave to USA Today about not wanting to be defined as an African-American quarterback. The producers on First Take surely knew the basic thrust of what Parker was going to say. And they surely knew he was going to say something controversial. And they surely liked that, because First Take is a show designed to draw ratings by stirring controversy.

ESPN  suspends Rob Parker

ESPN has suspended commentator Rob Parker for comments he made regarding Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III.

ESPN spokesman Josh Krulewitz said: “Following yesterday’s comments, Rob Parker has been suspended until further notice. We are conducting a full review.” Parker, appearing on ESPN’s “First Take” on Thursday, was asked about Griffin’s role as a black quarterback. Parker questioned Griffin’s “blackness.” “Is he a brother or a cornball brother?” said Parker, who is black. Later, he said he wanted to find out more about Griffin and how he deals with black teammates and others in Washington. “We all know he has a white fiancée,” he said. “There was all this talk about he’s a Republican, which, there’s no information [about that] at all. I’m just trying to dig deeper as to why he has an issue. Because we did find out with Tiger Woods, Tiger Woods was like, I’ve got black skin, but don’t call me black. So people got to wondering about Tiger Woods early on.” Robert Griffin II, the quarterback’s father, told USA Today Sports Thursday night : “I wouldn’t say it’s racism. I would just say some people put things out there about people so they can stir things up.” DeMaurice Smith, executive director of the NFL Players Association, told The Washington Post in an email Friday: “Robert can certainly take care of himself. Nonetheless, I hope that our men and for that matter, my own kids, will never beg for authenticity from someone who can only talk about the things that other people have the courage to do. People need to be held accountable for the offensive things that they say

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52 Responses to “ESPN admits Rob Parker’s RG3 comments were inappropriate – Update: ESPN suspends Rob Parker”
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  1. 1 | December 13, 2012 10:21 pm

    This type of thinking is just evil.


  2. Speranza
    2 | December 13, 2012 10:44 pm

    Skip Bayless who is on the same show is just as big a jerk.


  3. Speranza
    3 | December 13, 2012 10:51 pm

    Mike Soltys ‏@espnmikes

    Have been asked for comment on Rob Parker comments: The comments were inappropriate and we are evaluating our next steps.


  4. Brick
    4 | December 13, 2012 10:56 pm

    I don’t watch sports so unfortunately these names don’t resonate with me. From what I’ve read of this affair however, the network that hired and fired Olbermann obviously hasn’t raised their intellectual bar for on-air talent.


  5. Mars
    5 | December 13, 2012 10:57 pm

    http://reason.com/blog/2012/12/13/the-gop-committee-purge-not-about-policy

    GOP elites go Alinsky. On our own.


  6. 7 | December 13, 2012 11:05 pm

    @ Mars:

    look who is calling out the GOP elites. My man Rand Paul!


  7. Mars
    8 | December 13, 2012 11:07 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    @ Mars:
    look who is calling out the GOP elites. My man Rand Paul!

    Yeah but Paul and Ryan have had a personal war going for some time. Ryan may be complicit, but the main villain is Boehner.


  8. 9 | December 13, 2012 11:09 pm

    @ Mars:

    No question. Rand calls out Boehner as well.


  9. 10 | December 13, 2012 11:14 pm

    @ Mars:

    They should do a Libertarian-Conservative variant of that one. There are some differences between the 2 main factions of the Right. I’m sure the economic areas would be the same, but there would some differences in the social sphere.


  10. Mars
    11 | December 13, 2012 11:16 pm

    http://tinyurl.com/c5rw6t2
    Actually there are many things on that list I don’t want to see.

    (Why are so many conservatives ignorant of the true reason behind the pledge of allegiance?)

    Francis Bellamy (1855 -- 1931), a Baptist minister, wrote the original Pledge in August 1892. He was a Christian Socialist. In his Pledge, he is expressing the ideas of his first cousin, Edward Bellamy, author of the American socialist utopian novels, Looking Backward (1888) and Equality (1897).

    There he was involved with the social, religious, labor and economic problems of the city’s poor factory workers. While pastor he gave a speech entitled “Jesus the Socialist” and a series of sermons on “The Socialism of the Primitive Church.”

    Francis Bellamy’s cousin, Edward Bellamy, was then famous as the author of the best-sellers “Looking Backward” and “Equality” and was leader of a socialist movement called “Nationalism.” Both books advocated a socialist utopian state with political, social and economic equality for all, operated by the federal government. Francis Bellamy was a vice-president of the Christian Society of Socialists, an auxiliary of his cousin’s “Nationalism” movement. In 1891, Bellamy was forced to resign from his Boston Pastorate because the conservative businessmen of the “Committee on Christian Work of the Baptist Social Union” withheld additional funds for his work. The Committee complained of Bellamy’s increased socialist sermons and activities.

    Bellamy accepted the task of writing a new pledge which would promote his ideas of nationalism, patriotism, statism and socialism. Bellamy’s original pledge was soon approved and accepted by Upham, Ford and the NEA, which reads as follows: “I pledge allegiance to my flag and to the Republic for which it stands; one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.” The original salute to the flag was with the right arm outstretched and raised, not our present day right hand over the heart.

    Several sources.

    The pledge was a way of cementing a childs dedication and loyalty to the federal government, not the country as a principle.


  11. Mars
    12 | December 13, 2012 11:16 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    @ Mars:
    They should do a Libertarian-Conservative variant of that one. There are some differences between the 2 main factions of the Right. I’m sure the economic areas would be the same, but there would some differences in the social sphere.

    Very much so.


  12. 13 | December 13, 2012 11:17 pm

    @ Mars:

    The pledge was a way of cementing a childs dedication and loyalty to the federal government, not the country as a principle.

    Wow, so i is National Socialist in origins? I never knew that.


  13. Mars
    14 | December 13, 2012 11:17 pm

    The wording which Bellamy used in the writing of his pledge was intended to weld together the mentality of all Americans in their allegiance to a centralized federal government. The word “allegiance” was taken from Lincoln’s “Oath of Allegiance” for rebellious Southerners. The word “indivisible” was in opposition to the concept of secession which resulted in the War for Southern Independence of 1861-1865. Both ideas were intended as propaganda tools for altering the minds of school children nationwide, and especially those of the South. Bellamy’s idea of “liberty and justice for all” found in the 14th, 15th and 16th amendments were really substitute words that he felt forced to use instead of his desired slogan of the French Revolution, which was, “Liberty, Equality, and Fraternity.”


  14. 15 | December 13, 2012 11:20 pm

    @ Mars:

    Bellamy’s idea of “liberty and justice for all” found in the 14th, 15th and 16th amendments were really substitute words that he felt forced to use instead of his desired slogan of the French Revolution, which was, “Liberty, Equality, and Fraternity.”\

    It is Jacobin in its roots. This is shocking stuff.


  15. Mars
    16 | December 13, 2012 11:20 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    @ Mars:
    The pledge was a way of cementing a childs dedication and loyalty to the federal government, not the country as a principle.
    Wow, so i is National Socialist in origins? I never knew that.

    Most of the conservative movement has no idea. They’ve had it beaten into their head for so long that they just automatically think it is a great thing.

    They also fight for “under god” which wasn’t even in the pledge till many years later because of a campaign by the Knights of Columbus.

    FDR by the way, loved the pledge, he considered it a valuable loyalty oath.


  16. Mars
    17 | December 13, 2012 11:21 pm

    Francis Bellamy as a “Christian Socialist” in conjunction with many other liberal thinkers and writers of his day favored a socialistic centralized federal government as opposed to traditional conservative Christianity and local government concepts of the South. He, along with his cousin Edward, became the heroes of John Dewey and other advocates of “progressive education;” which in one hundred years has resulted in producing a morally corrupt, anti-Christian, multi-cultural secular public school system which now openly opposes traditional Christian culture.

    Note the name John Dewey.


  17. 18 | December 13, 2012 11:23 pm

    @ Mars:

    Francis Bellamy as a “Christian Socialist”

    Sounds like Rick Santorum or Mike Huckabee.


  18. 19 | December 13, 2012 11:24 pm

    @ Mars:

    I have been warning Conservatives that there is a Progressive infiltration on the Right. Just because someone claims they are for God and Country dos not mean they are Conservative.

    This is good stuff your digging up.


  19. Mars
    20 | December 13, 2012 11:25 pm

    FDR also had nothing to do with the ending of the Bellamy Salute (aka Nazi salute) in this country. It is a common myth that recently took on new life with uninformed (or intentionally manipulative) wikipedia contributors.


  20. Mars
    21 | December 13, 2012 11:26 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    @ Mars:
    I have been warning Conservatives that there is a Progressive infiltration on the Right. Just because someone claims they are for God and Country dos not mean they are Conservative.
    This is good stuff your digging up.

    Did you ever get your hand on the book I recommended to you?


  21. Mars
    22 | December 13, 2012 11:27 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    @ Mars:
    Francis Bellamy as a “Christian Socialist”
    Sounds like Rick Santorum or Mike Huckabee.

    As bad as they are, the true christian socialists were and are a thousand times worse.


  22. 23 | December 13, 2012 11:32 pm

    @ Mars:

    Can you remind me? I recall you mentioned it.


  23. Mars
    24 | December 13, 2012 11:34 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    @ Mars:
    Can you remind me? I recall you mentioned it.

    http://www.amazon.com/Conservative-History-American-Left/dp/0307339467

    Take a look at the bottom of the last thread. There was an interesting discussion. I think you’ll enjoy one of my points.


  24. Mars
    25 | December 13, 2012 11:39 pm

    http://www.ethansabo.com/post/15111024777

    Check out the first pic on this site. Epic.


  25. 27 | December 13, 2012 11:49 pm

    @ Mars:

    Got it and I will order ir.


  26. 28 | December 13, 2012 11:49 pm

    Night all!


  27. Mars
    29 | December 13, 2012 11:52 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    Night all!

    Night.

    You won’t regret it.


  28. 30 | December 14, 2012 12:13 am

    I like white people, and I have a personal stake in this since I am mostly white, and I don’t like it when white people are victims of hate crimes.

    But just because I like white people doesn’t mean I am going to make a fuss if “one of us” goes and intermarries. I only request that the offspring is brought up not to end up like Janjak Desalin, who hated one whole half of himself and made a ruin of his nation in the process.

    It appears that with RGIII that he has no intention of raising his kids to hate whites or blacks.

    Why exactly does Parker have a problem with this? Wasn’t that part of “the struggle”?


  29. Alberta Oil Peon
    31 | December 14, 2012 12:27 am

    If Rob Parker needs to find somebody “inauthentically black” to rag on, he need look no farther than the White House. I mean, really, what does Barack Obama have in common with the typical black American other than the optical properties of his hide?

    By the way, greetings from Nicaragua. Just came from eating an awesome seafood dinner at a restaurant near my hotel, and Daniel Ortega came on the TV. Funny, the sound went off about 2 paragraphs into his oration.


  30. Buffalobob
    32 | December 14, 2012 1:20 am

    Rob Parker reminds me of the black youths in school who tormented other black youths for excelling in their grades and thereby acting white.


  31. 33 | December 14, 2012 1:33 am

    @ Zimriel:
    I’vm finding out that the guy I room with is a racist. Especially with Обама. I call him a Filthy Communist Bastard. He calls him the Head [N-Word]. Frankly it’s quite disgusting.
    As soon as all my legal actions are completed. I’ll be fixing to move out.


  32. darkwords
    34 | December 14, 2012 1:40 am

    What is educating people to think this way? A congressman, now a judge. It has to be a curriculum somewhere, but I have never come across it.


  33. darkwords
    35 | December 14, 2012 1:44 am

    Mr. Akin is not alone in his view about rape and pregnancy, however. It dates at least to medieval times, when a 13th-century English legal tome called Fleta asserted that pregnancy was prima facie evidence against a charge of rape, “for without a woman’s consent she could not conceive.”

    A 19th century book, Elements of Medical Jurisprudence by Samuel Farr, said that conception is unlikely “without an excitation of lust, or the enjoyment of pleasure in the venereal act.” That reflected the common notion that pregnancy requires a woman, like a man, to reach orgasm during intercourse.

    Some people think huckabee defends this.


  34. yenta-fada
    36 | December 14, 2012 2:22 am

    why Romney lost the election…

    Romney said, “When I’m elected, I will put Americans back to work,” and 51% said, “Screw That!!”


  35. 37 | December 14, 2012 4:39 am

    Last full day in the office for 2012. I will go in for a half-day tomorrow, but that’s it.

    Doing the “Happy Dance” here…


  36. Daffy Duck
    38 | December 14, 2012 6:56 am

    I think Rob Parker has been fired and/or resigned from every broadcast position he’s had due to his bullshit commentary.

    He’s been on and off of most every metro Detroit TV sports and radio station, if I recall.


  37. 39 | December 14, 2012 7:28 am

    So, RGIII, to his enormous credit, chooses to be judged “on the content of his character rather than the color of his skin” and he’s considered “inauthentic” by this this talentless hack, Rob Parker?

    So, who are the “authentic” blacks, the gangbangers, the wife beaters and misogynists, the crack-addled, the 13 year-old armed robbers and murderers?

    RGIII is a huge bright spot in an increasingly troubled “black community” (oh, how I hate that term) and Parker and his ilk ar to vested in their own racism to recognize the value of RGIII, not only to blacks, but to everyone. Too bad our President didnt choose not to be be defined by his race.


  38. Speranza
    40 | December 14, 2012 7:28 am

    Brick wrote:

    I don’t watch sports so unfortunately these names don’t resonate with me. From what I’ve read of this affair however, the network that hired and fired Olbermann obviously hasn’t raised their intellectual bar for on-air talent.

    They sure haven’t.


  39. Speranza
    41 | December 14, 2012 7:29 am

    MacDuff wrote:

    So, RGIII, to his enormous credit, chooses to be judged “on the content of his character rather than the color of his skin

    What a radical concept!


  40. 42 | December 14, 2012 7:35 am

    Speranza wrote:

    MacDuff wrote:

    So, RGIII, to his enormous credit, chooses to be judged “on the content of his character rather than the color of his skin

    What a radical concept!

    Yeah. The only remnant of MLK left in the “black community” seems to be the holiday.


  41. 43 | December 14, 2012 7:39 am

    @ Speranza:

    It is a radical concept. It would seem that the majority of th eblack community would rather be judged by the color of their skin than the content of their character. Thus we see opposition to Obama policies characterized as RAAAAACISM.


  42. Speranza
    44 | December 14, 2012 7:41 am

    MacDuff wrote:

    Yeah. The only remnant of MLK left in the “black community” seems to be the holiday.

    There has beeen a dramatics drop off from MLK, Whitney Young, Bayard Rustin, Ralph David Abernathy, Roy Wilkins to Jesse Jackson Al Sharpton, Barack Obama.


  43. Speranza
    45 | December 14, 2012 7:42 am

    Iron Fist wrote:

    @ Speranza:
    It is a radical concept. It would seem that the majority of th eblack community would rather be judged by the color of their skin than the content of their character. Thus we see opposition to Obama policies characterized as RAAAAACISM.

    And the loyalty to a black president where the unemployment rate amongst Blacks has dramatically risen.


  44. 46 | December 14, 2012 7:49 am

    @ Speranza:

    Yep, because Obama’s “down with the struggle”. That was what that high-dollar prep school prepped him for. What kills me is that they try to sell (successfully, it seems) that Obama came from poverty. He was raised by his grandmother, who was a bank vice-president. He went to the most elite private school in Hawaii. IF that is poverty, I grew up somewhere far below the poverty line.


  45. 47 | December 14, 2012 7:50 am

    Speranza wrote:

    And the loyalty to a black president where the unemployment rate amongst Blacks has dramatically risen.

    It’s just another example, in a long line of examples, of self-destructive behavior among blacks. If I were black, I’d be furious.


  46. Speranza
    48 | December 14, 2012 7:53 am

    MacDuff wrote:

    Speranza wrote:
    And the loyalty to a black president where the unemployment rate amongst Blacks has dramatically risen.

    It’s just another example, in a long line of examples, of self-destructive behavior among blacks. If I were black, I’d be furious.

    It really is a conundrum for the blacks. They rose so quickly into middle class status when Reagan was president.


  47. Speranza
    49 | December 14, 2012 7:54 am

    Iron Fist wrote:

    @ Speranza:
    Yep, because Obama’s “down with the struggle”. That was what that high-dollar prep school prepped him for. What kills me is that they try to sell (successfully, it seems) that Obama came from poverty. He was raised by his grandmother, who was a bank vice-president. He went to the most elite private school in Hawaii. IF that is poverty, I grew up somewhere far below the poverty line.

    Yeah the poor guy grew up in Hawaii.


  48. 50 | December 14, 2012 7:56 am

    Iron Fist wrote:

    Yep, because Obama’s “down with the struggle”. That was what that high-dollar prep school prepped him for. What kills me is that they try to sell (successfully, it seems) that Obama came from poverty. He was raised by his grandmother, who was a bank vice-president. He went to the most elite private school in Hawaii. IF that is poverty, I grew up somewhere far below the poverty line.

    Many blacks find a perverse solace in the “po black” stereotype. I wish I had a dollar for every black woman I’ve seen wearing an “Aunt Jemima” scarf on her head -- WTF? The problems are deep and pervasive and people like Parker…and Obama do nothing but feed the problem.


  49. 51 | December 14, 2012 7:58 am

    @ Speranza:

    It’s hard out there for a pimp choomer…


  50. 52 | December 14, 2012 12:39 pm

    I’m a little late to the party on this this, but I can’t let the customary smear against Rush Limbaugh go unchallenged:

    Rush Limbaugh, made racially charged comments about another quarterback, Donovan McNabb, that ended up being the last day that Limbaugh appeared on ESPN’s NFL pregame show.

    Rush pointed out, correctly, that the media was invested in having a black quarterback do well, and that as an example, they covered for McNabb while at the same time excoriating the performance of Matt Garcia of the 49ers, who was have a similar season and putting up similar numbers. Rush never said a word against McNabb. In fact, Michael Irvin completely agreed with Rush until the libturd cabal at ESPN told him to do a 180.


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