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Saturday At The Movies! The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly

by Flyovercountry ( 5 Comments › )
Filed under Headlines at January 12th, 2013 - 10:44 am

Another of my top three westerns this week. Clint Eastwood’s name can not be mentioned without the, “man with no name,” series being included as a part of his persona. His nemesis in the series Lee Van Cleef provides his usual menacing performance as one of the Western genre’s most memorable bad guys. Also delivering a terrific performance in this movie was one of Hollywood’s best character actors, Eli Wallach.

This particular movie provided the end to the, “man with no name series.” It was also, in my opinion at least, the best of that bunch. The movie concludes with what is perhaps the single most iconic standoff ever recorded. The three way gun duel between the the good, bad, and ugly, as there is only enough gold for a two way split. Parodied many times over the decades since this movie, it still stands as one of the few movie scenes worthy of such imitation.

UPDATE:

This got added as a comment, and I felt it worthy of sharing. Sergio Leone was Italian, and probably had zero idea of anything even remotely pertinent in terms of historical accuracy with his Westerns. His chief concerns probably had more to do with facial expressions, tension, interactions between the characters, music etc.

Still, I found this comment to be both fun and interesting. Hat tip Mike C., for posting this comment. It’s still a favorite movie.

That iconic stand-off scene is hilareous for it’s errors. Lee Van Cleef has his gun in a cartridge belt loaded with cartridges. What the cartridges are for we never will know, because his gun is a cap and ball revolver. It is also a cap and ball revolver with no caps on the nipples — not a good idea if you’re going to need to use it. Subsequently, Eastwood tells Wallach that he unloaded Wallach’s revolver the last night. Wallach’s revolver is also a cap and ball revolver. Ever try unloading a cap and ball revolver without just firing off the charges?

BTW, “Wild Bill” Hicock carried cap and ball revolvers even as cartridge revolvers were replacing them. He reloaded them every morning, and also did something else unusual for the time — he practiced with them. Didn’t carry them in holsters, either, but rather tucked in a sash he wore around his waist. Holsters of the time were designed for gun retention, not quick drawing.

Oh, and I rather imagine the late Bob Munden could have easily shot Eastwood, Van Cleef and Wallach before any of them could have gotten off a single shot. The man was mind-bogglingly fast.

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5 Responses to “Saturday At The Movies! The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly”
( jump to bottom )

  1. EBL
    1 | January 12, 2013 11:21 am

    These are movies you can watch again and again, right in the middle of if you find them on your TV, and it is no problem.


  2. unclassifiable
    2 | January 12, 2013 11:49 am

    @ EBL:

    And folks say Tarantino is some kind of genius. Then they watch these films and realize he is recycling.


  3. Conservative Democrat
    3 | January 12, 2013 1:46 pm

    Happens to be one of my favorite films also. I found on Amazon and VUDU a Chinese film almost exactly the same, it was a kind of parody and comical. The name of the film was (if I remember right)”the good, the bad and the stupid”.

    If you speak or understand Chinese it is even better, but the subtitles are better than average.

    I happen to really enjoy Japanese and Chinese (as well as Korean) Films. One of the best I have seen recently, and rather new, Is called “Painted Skin” fabulous artwork and cinemagraphics and really good plot line.

    Any of the Japanese Akira Kirosowa films are excellent.

    Sergio Leone was the Sam Penkinpaw of spanish movie Directors.


  4. 4 | January 13, 2013 7:37 am

    That iconic stand-off scene is hilareous for it’s errors. Lee Van Cleef has his gun in a cartridge belt loaded with cartridges. What the cartridges are for we never will know, because his gun is a cap and ball revolver. It is also a cap and ball revolver with no caps on the nipples -- not a good idea if you’re going to need to use it. Subsequently, Eastwood tells Wallach that he unloaded Wallach’s revolver the last night. Wallach’s revolver is also a cap and ball revolver. Ever try unloading a cap and ball revolver without just firing off the charges?

    BTW, “Wild Bill” Hicock carried cap and ball revolvers even as cartridge revolvers were replacing them. He reloaded them every morning, and also did something else unusual for the time -- he practiced with them. Didn’t carry them in holsters, either, but rather tucked in a sash he wore around his waist. Holsters of the time were designed for gun retention, not quick drawing.

    Oh, and I rather imagine the late Bob Munden could have easily shot Eastwood, Van Cleef and Wallach before any of them could have gotten off a single shot. The man was mind-bogglingly fast.


  5. 5 | January 13, 2013 6:25 pm

    And here’s a more recent performance of that epic scene’s signature song:

    MASTERFUL!


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