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Raised in a Bubble

by coldwarrior ( 170 Comments › )
Filed under Academia, Open thread at January 18th, 2013 - 3:00 pm

We are raising a generation of coddled, risk-averse children. The long term psychological consequences are that few will be willing to take risks while most will be paralyzed by the headlights of real life. The risk takers are and will be the leaders, the innovators; they will be able to be independent of nanny government. The bubble kids will be dependent on government posing as the nanny who keeps them safe from things that go bump in the night. These sickly, sun-starved kids will be less healthy and less well adjusted and will simply be followers, another generation of sheeple more interested in ever more ridiculous ‘reality shows’,  video games, and social media than actually getting face to face with other humans. Leaving the cocoon means fear, and fear is to be avoided; confidence destroyed for a lifetime, dependence embraced as a crutch.

 

The advantage is that the parents who raise their kids to not fear getting hurt and to embrace taking some risks, like playing contact sports or simply being a daredevils and adventurers outside, will raise the leaders of tomorrow. A broken arm is a badge of honor and some stitches are lessons learned, sleep is never better than after a long day outside hard at play. I expect kids to be loud at play, get banged up, and be adventurous, independent, and be confident. In the long run, these kids will grow up to be the leaders, confident in what they do.

 

Parent who raise their kids in a bubble do this nation and Western Civilization a disservice.

 

 

Prof Tanya Byron said that children’s natural development was being stunted after being refused the chance to play outside, banned from throwing snowballs and prevented from walking to school alone.

In previous generations, falling over and getting hurting was a rite of passage for many young people, with cuts and bruises being seen as a “badge of honour”, she said.

But she warned that rising numbers of children were being forced to attend A&E suffering minor injuries because they “don’t know how to fall any more”.

“They tense themselves up when they fall, so they sprain,” she said.

The comments – in a speech to the North of England Education Conference in Sheffield – come amid fears that growing exposure on technology and irrational fear over “stranger danger” is stopping children enjoying outdoor play.

Research last year by the National Children’s Bureau found that children were now less likely to pay outside than previous generations, with almost half of parents citing concerns over traffic, injuries or abduction.

But Prof Byron, a child psychologist and author, who carried out a Government review into the effect of video games and the internet on young people, said parental concerns had reached “insane” levels.

“We live in a risk-averse culture, the levels of paranoia about health and safety and wellbeing are insane,” she said. “Most children spend most of their childhoods being raised in captivity.”

Today’s children are “hugely, hugely restricted”, she told delegates.

She said: “There are no more predators on the streets, no more paedophiles, then when I was growing up in the 1970s.”

Prof Byron, who has featured on television programmes including Little Angels and The House of Tiny Tearaways, said children today were “rarely seen out”.

She quoted directives issued in some schools dictating that children cannot play with conkers without goggles or throw snowballs because they may have grit in them. She also told of youngsters being driven to school by parents up to the age of 11 and 12.

“Children are being raised in captivity, children are not free range any more,” she said.

“They are taking risks we are not preparing them for. They are having a blast in this fantastic global space. I would argue they are more vulnerable there than if they were hanging out on the street.”

In further comments, Prof Byron raised concerns that too much emphasis is being put on a child’s IQ, suggesting that emotional intelligence and maturuty also needed to be considered.

She said anyone who has spent time researching the subject knows that “exam results are the least reliable indicator of intelligence”.

The comments follow those made by the child psychologist last month when she claimed that pupils were “lacking massively in emotional resilience” because schools were so focused on exam results at the expense of educating the whole child.

She said that clinicians were seeing an increasing number of “breakdowns” among young people who are “bright and who stereotypically don’t come from backgrounds where you would predict a greater chance of them having emotional, psychological or mental health problems”.

 

 

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170 Responses to “Raised in a Bubble”
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  1. buzzsawmonkey
    1 | January 18, 2013 3:24 pm

    Bubble-wrap babies! Cotton-wool kiddies!

    No more jungle gyms, teeter-totters, hard swings—and certainly no merry-go-rounds—on school playgrounds, for fear of lawsuits. Rubber matting, because God forbid somebody should fall on asphalt. Pre-1985 children’s books banned “for health reasons” because of alleged trace elements of lead in the printing ink.

    Well, as to that last, maybe there were—it might explain the idiocy of people who grew up exposed to all those playground perils, and those old books, and who reached majority apparently without serious injury or impairment, running to ban the very things they played with when they themselves were young.


  2. 2 | January 18, 2013 3:26 pm

    Coddling young children is actually cruel.


  3. 3 | January 18, 2013 3:32 pm

    @ Rodan:

    It raises them unprepared for independent life, but that is one of the goals of the Socialist State. Independence must be crushed out of the populace, and the younger they start, the more likely it is to take. Public schools are, not surprisingly, one of the main avenues for this, but parents also have a role to play. I’ve seen children, not mentally disabled children, mind you, wearing helmets to be toddlers. This is quite insane. There is a real phobia at play here.


  4. 4 | January 18, 2013 3:34 pm

    @ Iron Fist:

    but parents also have a role to play.

    That is the issue, right there.


  5. citizen_q
    5 | January 18, 2013 3:36 pm

    Radio is repoting boner has backed off of debt ceiling demands, kicked can down the road 3 months.

    Am I the only one getting sick and tired of never fixing anything, just postponing the hard decisions for a couple of months to keep everyone in a state of impending doom?

    I know one of the reasons for a perpetual states of emergency is to push though overreaching legislation. Still


  6. 6 | January 18, 2013 3:40 pm

    citizen_q wrote:

    Radio is repoting boner has backed off of debt ceiling demands, kicked can down the road 3 months.

    That’s not exactly true, from what I’ve read. The deal is that they’ll kick the can down the road three months if the Senate passes a budget. Since the Democrats can’t pass a budget, it isn’t much of a kick. It gives them three months to demonstrat how miserably they are failing at their basic job.


  7. 7 | January 18, 2013 3:41 pm

    @ Iron Fist:

    Link


  8. buzzsawmonkey
    8 | January 18, 2013 3:41 pm

    Iron Fist wrote:

    I’ve seen children, not mentally disabled children, mind you, wearing helmets to be toddlers. This is quite insane. There is a real phobia at play here.

    Remember that in white-upper-middle-class Abortion Land, it is not uncommon to delay having children until the mother to be has “had it all,” i.e., pursued a career. It is harder to bring a child to term if you start later in life, and there are, I understand, studies which suggest that a prior abortion may also affect the possibility of having children; hence the huge growth in recent years of the fertility industry.

    When you have fewer children later in life and have had to spend big money to be able to have them, they are Special Rarities. This is not to suggest that all children aren’t precious—I’m merely pointing out that as families have become smaller children are being treated as rare jewels rather than as children. There’s an analogy here to suntans, and to fat; until the 1920s, suntans were a mark of being lower class, because they indicated you were someone who labored in the outdoors. By the 1920s, so many people were employed in offices and factories that a suntan became a mark of wealth and leisure, because it meant that you had the time and wherewithal to take a vacation. Likewise, fat: stoutness was valued as a mark of wealth up through the early 20th century, because it indicated you were getting enough to eat. Slenderness came in in the ’20s, and has been progressively exalting the skeletal look ever since.

    Likewise, children; now, they are treasured as the final capstone to the have-it-all life, a sort of granite and stainless steel kitchen with legs, cunning sayings, and a college fund. They are regarded as something precious to be preserved, like the granite and stainless kitchen, and protected accordingly.


  9. Lily
    9 | January 18, 2013 3:46 pm

    @ Iron Fist:
    @ Rodan:

    This is nothing new. This has been brewing since my two sons were young. First the teachers wanting boys doped with ADD meds for acting like boys. I’m not saying that there are children with ADD. But way too many children were put on meds for just being children. Children will be children. And really you have to blame this behavior of *bubble children* on the parents. But there is some hope out there to be honest….kids tend to rebel against helicopter parents big time. So the risk taking is still going to be there. Have some hope.


  10. 10 | January 18, 2013 3:48 pm

    @ buzzsawmonkey:

    The problem is its too expensive to have kids. The way economic conditions have been the last 12 years, it’s tough to financially afford a kid.


  11. AZfederalist
    11 | January 18, 2013 3:52 pm

    citizen_q wrote:

    Radio is repoting boner has backed off of debt ceiling demands, kicked can down the road 3 months.

    Am I the only one getting sick and tired of never fixing anything, just postponing the hard decisions for a couple of months to keep everyone in a state of impending doom?

    I know one of the reasons for a perpetual states of emergency is to push though overreaching legislation. Still

    With the current GOP establishment, the real battle is always the next one. The immediate battle is always too high risk and will be a PR nightmare and we can’t risk the fallout from the court of public opinion. Can’t be taking such risks (See how I tied this in?)


  12. 12 | January 18, 2013 3:52 pm

    @ Rodan:

    I don’t think it is a money issue. The people who are into this “helicopter parenting” are generally well to do. I think Buzz is on to something, though. They see their kids as the ultimate designer accessory.


  13. unclassifiable
    13 | January 18, 2013 3:52 pm

    This problem started when they banned firecrackers and bottle rockets.

    I ride my bike along the bayous here.

    That used to be my playground growing up.

    Dirty water, snakes, throwing rocks, looking for crawfish, and shooting bb guns.

    Today I hardly see anyone except an adult walking their dog.

    And I think to myself that something is wrong.


  14. Lily
    14 | January 18, 2013 3:53 pm

    @ buzzsawmonkey:

    You are correct in a sense. Children are your heart walking outside of your body and what you live for. But and this is a big butt…you have to let your butterflies go out on their own. Some parents just can’t do this. Why? Because of what you just posted…instead of parents being parents too many parents tend to want to be their childrens FRIENDS!!! Look a kid has friends here and there but will only have two parents. This is something parents now days need to understand. They are parents not friends and they need to let them fly on their own. Is it painful? Hell yes! But you have to grit your teeth and bear it for a little while….because it bears great fruit to see how your child has grown up to be a responsible adult and parent and you just couldn’t be more proud. Parenting isn’t for the faint of heart. Sometimes as a parent you have to really suck it up and be a parent!!!


  15. citizen_q
    15 | January 18, 2013 3:53 pm

    @ Iron Fist:
    Not too surprised.

    It irks me no end that conservative talk radio stations still subscribe to liberal reporting on their half hour newsbreaks from regular programming.

    Should have poked around some to vet the reporting a bit before I opened my mouth.


  16. 16 | January 18, 2013 3:53 pm

    @ Lily:

    ADD is BS. It’s an excuse to make money for the Pharmaceutical ndustry.


  17. 17 | January 18, 2013 3:54 pm

    Iron Fist wrote:

    @ Rodan:
    I don’t think it is a money issue. The people who are into this “helicopter parenting” are generally well to do. I think Buzz is on to something, though. They see their kids as the ultimate designer accessory.

    Well the people I know who have delayed having Kids is because they can not afford them.


  18. Lily
    18 | January 18, 2013 3:55 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    @ buzzsawmonkey:
    The problem is its too expensive to have kids. The way economic conditions have been the last 12 years, it’s tough to financially afford a kid.

    Nope it has nothing to do with money.


  19. RIX
    19 | January 18, 2013 3:55 pm

    @ AZfederalist:
    Romney had one killer debate & then played it safe , not to lose.
    he could have & should have skewered obama on Benghazi.
    He should have meticulously explained it ignoring the moderator & Obama
    whining.
    He needed to be more agressive.


  20. Lily
    20 | January 18, 2013 3:58 pm

    unclassifiable wrote:

    This problem started when they banned firecrackers and bottle rockets.
    I ride my bike along the bayous here.
    That used to be my playground growing up.
    Dirty water, snakes, throwing rocks, looking for crawfish, and shooting bb guns.
    Today I hardly see anyone except an adult walking their dog.
    And I think to myself that something is wrong.

    Yep! Kids aren’t able to be kids anymore because of their parents fears. Sometimes you just have to grit your teeth and let them skin their knee sometimes.


  21. 21 | January 18, 2013 3:59 pm

    @ Lily:

    Yes it does. I know people who wanted to have kids, but it’s too expensive. The few whop did are struggling financially.


  22. 22 | January 18, 2013 4:00 pm

    @ Lily:

    Yep! Kids aren’t able to be kids anymore because of their parents fears. Sometimes you just have to grit your teeth and let them skin their knee sometimes.

    Agree.


  23. Lily
    23 | January 18, 2013 4:01 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    Iron Fist wrote:
    @ Rodan:
    I don’t think it is a money issue. The people who are into this “helicopter parenting” are generally well to do. I think Buzz is on to something, though. They see their kids as the ultimate designer accessory.
    Well the people I know who have delayed having Kids is because they can not afford them.

    Delayed having kids because of money??? How old are they? I know lots of younger people who have kids because they want children and money has nothing to do with it at all. When you want a baby you want a baby and will be willing to sacrafice for the baby because you know what if you wait until you have enough money you’ll never have any children or you will be having children when other parents are having grandchildren.


  24. heysoos
    24 | January 18, 2013 4:01 pm

    for me parenting was a piece of cake and my two kids are fine…a lot depends on your style and habits…my kids ALWAYS came first, not with indulgence but with attention…I’m very close to both of them, but you absolutely have to commit from the very day they are born…you have to want to be a parent…I’m not a particularly good role model for day to day business and I have some bad habits, but I never tried to hide anything from my kids either..I made them understand that they were responsible for their behavior, not me…do whatever you want, just don’t piss me off was the only hard fast rule…what more do you need?


  25. Lily
    25 | January 18, 2013 4:03 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    @ Lily:
    ADD is BS. It’s an excuse to make money for the Pharmaceutical ndustry.

    Indeed! But it is a real thing…it just isn’t all that common to be honest. I have seen kids with real ADD…WHOA! They are few and rare though.


  26. 26 | January 18, 2013 4:04 pm

    @ Lily:

    Why bring a baby into poverty? SO they can go to a crappy schools? Not everyone thinks alike.


  27. 27 | January 18, 2013 4:06 pm

    @ Lily:

    I am sure there is real ADD, but now its used as pretext to drug up kids.


  28. citizen_q
    28 | January 18, 2013 4:07 pm

    unclassifiable wrote:

    This problem started when they banned firecrackers and bottle rockets.
    I ride my bike along the bayous here.
    That used to be my playground growing up.
    Dirty water, snakes, throwing rocks, looking for crawfish, and shooting bb guns.
    Today I hardly see anyone except an adult walking their dog.
    And I think to myself that something is wrong.

    Don’t have kids, so can only speak to my distant memories of my childhood.

    During summer vacation from school mom made us breakfast and if it wasn’t raining cats and dogs shooed out the the door. There was no question of us hanging around in the house. If we showed up for lunch ok. If we showed up for lunch with our friends ok all were fed then back out the the door for the lot of us. Same thing if we ended up at one of our friends house’s at lunch time.

    All the kids in the neighbourhood were all out on our own during the day for the most part. We learned to play on our own, Make friends. Learn whom to avoid. We got into fights. We had legendary adventures tamping through the woods, making forts, playing war.

    When we were old enough for bikes and learned to ride a whole wider world opened for exploration.

    We all survived. Though there were some close calls till we figured out how to tell time by the sun close enough to be home in time for dinner.


  29. 29 | January 18, 2013 4:07 pm

    Great Post Cold!


  30. Lily
    30 | January 18, 2013 4:07 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    @ Lily:
    Yes it does. I know people who wanted to have kids, but it’s too expensive. The few whop did are struggling financially.

    Those aren’t all people. Really. So you have come across people who think having money is more important than having kids. Me I know lots of young adults who think having kids is more important than money. Just as long as you can feed them, shelter them and love them. Young parents always struggle. When I got pregnant …money was the last thing on my mind. We did fine and we did without somethings..but having a child was more important.


  31. buzzsawmonkey
    31 | January 18, 2013 4:07 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    Well the people I know who have delayed having Kids is because they can not afford them.

    There are lots of people who delay having kids “because they can’t afford them” because “affording them” mean being able to have a nanny, private schools, play dates, etc., etc.

    Our grandparents were a lot poorer than we are, in most cases; they had kids whether they could “afford” them or not because there was less birth control available, and because without children you were probably condemned to a destitute and solitary old age—and, of course, because they liked children, and wanted to live on through their children, too.

    For a great many people of the College Class, “having kids” means having to give up hanging out in cool restaurants and taking trips to Europe, and instead having to consider moving to someplace like Staten Island and hanging out with …those people. Seriously; there are frequently articles in the NY Times along these lines. There was one a couple of years ago about a woman who was pregnant with twins or triplets—it was time to have kid to “have it all,” you see, and she’d waited long enough to need fertility drugs, which is part of why she had a multiple pregnancy—who was contemplating selectively aborting one of the children she was carrying because she could handle her Precious Single Accessory, but more than one would mean having to leave hip Manhattan to go to Staten Island or Brooklyn, for space reasons. Seriously. And the Times was surprised at the outpouring of negative letters it got.


  32. heysoos
    32 | January 18, 2013 4:09 pm

    @ citizen_q:
    almost an exact replication of my own upbringing…lots of independence, figure it out, learn


  33. buzzsawmonkey
    33 | January 18, 2013 4:11 pm

    Lily wrote:

    I know lots of younger people who have kids because they want children and money has nothing to do with it at all. When you want a baby you want a baby and will be willing to sacrafice for the baby because you know what if you wait until you have enough money you’ll never have any children or you will be having children when other parents are having grandchildren.

    There used to be an old saying that a child was “a hostage to fortune.” Most films from the 1930s—a lean time, you will recall, in America—show parents succeeding all the more because with a child dependent on them they redoubled their efforts to make good.

    The whole concept of “making good” and redoubling one’s efforts to do so, the common currency of conversation and thought in our parents’ and grandparents’ day, is almost disappeared.


  34. Lily
    34 | January 18, 2013 4:12 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    @ Lily:
    Why bring a baby into poverty? SO they can go to a crappy schools? Not everyone thinks alike.

    Poverty????????????????????? I didn’t raise my kids in poverty!!!! Even though we had little money when they were born!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! My kids didn’t lack for anything…and we didn’t stay poor all their lives…what are you talking about? As my husband and I grew older we made more money. I don’t think you understand.


  35. 35 | January 18, 2013 4:13 pm

    @ Lily:

    I guess it’s all difference in perspective. This is probably one of the big differences between libertarians and Conservatives.

    This issue is kind of personal for me, that’s why I’m holding back saying more. Not that I’m mad at you or anything, but kids as a subject really get me emotional.


  36. heysoos
    36 | January 18, 2013 4:15 pm

    hell, I’d do it all over again in a heartbeat…right from day one


  37. 37 | January 18, 2013 4:15 pm

    @ Lily:

    This is a dividing line between Conservatives and Libertarians. We are selfish, materialistic and Individualistic. Conservatives are Family oreinted and Communal.

    There are people who would love to have kids, but can’t afford them nor find the right partners either. Times have changed.


  38. 38 | January 18, 2013 4:15 pm

    heysoos wrote:

    hell, I’d do it all over again in a heartbeat…right from day one

    Not everyone is so lucky.


  39. 39 | January 18, 2013 4:17 pm

    Hey Lilly, I am out for now. No hard feelings, just this is very emotional issue for me that brings out a dark side.

    You did right having kids young and bringing them into the world. Not everyone is so lucky. God Bless you and your offspring.

    See you later.


  40. unclassifiable
    40 | January 18, 2013 4:18 pm

    @ citizen_q:

    Same with me. Sometimes when mom was busy (probably resting or just having a cigarette break) she would lock us outside and tell us to use the garden hose if we needed a drink.

    I was shot or hit with the following as a kid:

    bb’s
    pellets
    a bat
    a baseball
    an arrow (man did I bleed)
    a homemade spear
    a bottle rocket
    a hard plastic swimming snorkle
    a pen knife
    fists
    a dart
    a tennis racket

    This of course does not count various scrapes from bikes and motorcycles.

    And I played damn near every sport.


  41. heysoos
    41 | January 18, 2013 4:19 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    heysoos wrote:
    hell, I’d do it all over again in a heartbeat…right from day one

    Not everyone is so lucky.

    sometimes you gotta make your own luck bro…if I could be a successful parent 95/100 others could too


  42. heysoos
    42 | January 18, 2013 4:21 pm

    @ unclassifiable:
    we used to have BB gun wars…put on your winter jacket, gloves, diving mask etc…c’ya mom!


  43. Lily
    43 | January 18, 2013 4:22 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    @ Lily:
    This is a dividing line between Conservatives and Libertarians. We are selfish, materialistic and Individualistic. Conservatives are Family oreinted and Communal.
    There are people who would love to have kids, but can’t afford them nor find the right partners either. Times have changed.

    Sure times have changed…but not all that much. The young couples I know think nothing about having children because love is what they are concerned with. I think you are painting with a broad brush that all parents wait until they have enough money and excatly how much is enough? Some do wait…others don’t. Where I live children are important and part of being married. Sure there are those who wait till they can afford a house, afford a private school, afford a nanny, afford all the stuff kids really don’t need. I live in a nice area where all the schools are good. I don’t live in a city. Maybe that is the difference. Every young couple I know who are married in their 20′s have children and at least two if not more. They struggle but they aren’t in poverty…they work hard for their children.


  44. Lily
    45 | January 18, 2013 4:24 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    @ Lily:
    I guess it’s all difference in perspective. This is probably one of the big differences between libertarians and Conservatives.
    This issue is kind of personal for me, that’s why I’m holding back saying more. Not that I’m mad at you or anything, but kids as a subject really get me emotional.

    What have I said wrong? I have raised children…they are 31 and 27 now. So children are special to me too! I don’t understand what I am saying is so wrong to you! I have been there and done that.


  45. unclassifiable
    46 | January 18, 2013 4:25 pm

    @ heysoos:

    It was fun shooting your buddy in the ass :-D

    You learned to sneak up and watch you back.


  46. Lily
    47 | January 18, 2013 4:27 pm

    @ Rodan:

    Rodan what did I say wrong? And God Bless you too.


  47. unclassifiable
    48 | January 18, 2013 4:29 pm

    @ Rodan:

    Rodan,

    I completely understand.

    I wanted kids but chose poorly for my wife and made the “waiting for the perfect time” mistake.

    It happens guy. There is no shame to this.


  48. coldwarrior
    49 | January 18, 2013 4:29 pm

    wait till yinz see the suspension bridge, jungle gym sliding board tree house sandbox that i am building for the girls this spring! plenty of skinned knees and bruises.


  49. heysoos
    50 | January 18, 2013 4:30 pm

    unclassifiable wrote:

    @ heysoos:
    It was fun shooting your buddy in the ass
    You learned to sneak up and watch you back.

    I shot my pal just above but exactly right between the eyes and the BB penetrated in a bloody bump…we were flabbergasted, but he was fine and it didn’t hurt he said…of course after his parents dug it out, that was then end of our BB gun battles…good times and at that point we moved up to theft and general mayhem…I always considered my childhood as perfect and I simply copied my folks style


  50. Lily
    51 | January 18, 2013 4:31 pm

    @ coldwarrior:

    LOL! They are going to have a blast!!


  51. unclassifiable
    52 | January 18, 2013 4:32 pm

    @ heysoos:

    And in that small passage many of life’s lesson’s were learned.


  52. Lily
    53 | January 18, 2013 4:32 pm

    unclassifiable wrote:

    @ Rodan:
    Rodan,
    I completely understand.
    I wanted kids but chose poorly for my wife and made the “waiting for the perfect time” mistake.
    It happens guy. There is no shame to this.

    Really sorry if I touched a nerve with Rodan or any other posters…I must really be off the mark today. :(


  53. taxfreekiller
    54 | January 18, 2013 4:33 pm

    Ludwigg van is Quacked is doing bible study over in hells kitchen.

    I have one of my socks based in Calif. agreeing with him, he seems to like my sock somewhat. Very cold blooded sock.


  54. unclassifiable
    55 | January 18, 2013 4:34 pm

    @ coldwarrior:

    Woohoo

    They will do the “who can swing jump the farthest” and somebody will attempt to do a 360 (I came close before the swing set came out of the ground.

    I’m smiling.


  55. coldwarrior
    56 | January 18, 2013 4:35 pm

    Lily wrote:

    Really sorry if I touched a nerve with Rodan or any other posters…I must really be off the mark today. :(

    na, he’s got a tragedy from his past that haunts him. nothing you did.


  56. Lily
    57 | January 18, 2013 4:36 pm

    @ unclassifiable:

    Oh you didn’t do the swing around the top??? I did and came flying out and then went to the ER to see if my arm was broke. I got lucky and it wasn’t.


  57. coldwarrior
    58 | January 18, 2013 4:36 pm

    @ unclassifiable:

    the suspension bridge will come off of the back deck (8 ft above the yard) and connect to the ‘treehouse’, build off from there.


  58. unclassifiable
    59 | January 18, 2013 4:36 pm

    @ Lily:

    I don’t think it’s your fault. It’s the subject.

    He’ll be fine. He just needed to take some time out.

    I have been there myself for some blog topics.


  59. citizen_q
    60 | January 18, 2013 4:36 pm

    @ unclassifiable:
    LOL! You have a few on me. Home made spear? That’s a good one!

    We made apple grenades by embedding firecrackers in the little sour apples that fell out of our apple tree in my backyard. Got in trouble when my mother saw us trying to make frog grenades, once. Glad she never caught us playing backyard front yard lawn darts.Iit wasn’t long before we lost them stuck into the roof. Got them back when it was time to clean the gutters.

    I was mowing our yard when I was 7 with a power mower, same as my friends. I had hand surgery last summer and I could not find a neighbourhood kid who could really do it for a few weeks while I healed up. There was a one kid who to his credit tried, but I had to clean it up best I could after he was done and went home. I was able to it mostly one handed after that. Had to get a neighbor to help me start my weed wacker though. I could not get that darn thing started one handed. I must have been a sight trying though.


  60. Lily
    61 | January 18, 2013 4:37 pm

    coldwarrior wrote:

    Lily wrote:
    Really sorry if I touched a nerve with Rodan or any other posters…I must really be off the mark today.
    na, he’s got a tragedy from his past that haunts him. nothing you did.

    Sorry to hear that..I’ll keep that in mind next time.
    /very sorry Rodan.


  61. heysoos
    62 | January 18, 2013 4:37 pm

    @ coldwarrior:
    at my place, I had a giant old tulip tree at the back of the property and a chicken coop full of old usable stuff, so I digressed back to my boyhood and build a magnificent, three ‘story’ tree fort, part enclosed, ladders and ropes, platforms, the works…I still have pictures of it…the kids went nuts, they fought over who was gonna sleep up there…below and next to that tree was my finest accomplishment when I converted an old chicken coop like shack into a cool pad, cable tv, electric, fridge, bar…it was my own rock and roll shrine with tour posters, sports stuff, veranda, fire pit, the works…needless to say our place was THE place for the kids and their friends…I really miss that time of my life


  62. unclassifiable
    63 | January 18, 2013 4:37 pm

    @ Lily:

    Like I said the darn swing set came out of the ground and whacked the crap out of me and my brother.

    Big assed knot on my head.


  63. citizen_q
    64 | January 18, 2013 4:38 pm

    heysoos wrote:

    @ unclassifiable:
    we used to have BB gun wars…put on your winter jacket, gloves, diving mask etc…c’ya mom!

    Sling shots and acorns.


  64. Guggi
    65 | January 18, 2013 4:39 pm

    If parents would raise their children like three/four/five decades ago they would be permantly in prison.


  65. heysoos
    66 | January 18, 2013 4:40 pm

    coldwarrior wrote:

    @ unclassifiable:
    the suspension bridge will come off of the back deck (8 ft above the yard) and connect to the ‘treehouse’, build off from there.

    tre kewl…the ideas abound…I love that sort of stuff


  66. RIX
    67 | January 18, 2013 4:40 pm

    I agree with the post almost in total.
    my caveat is “Stranger Danger”.
    If you raise a girl he is not some abstraction, but a real threat.


  67. Lily
    68 | January 18, 2013 4:40 pm

    @ unclassifiable:

    Understand. Some subjects are touchy. I really didn’t want to bring up some bad memories for Rodan.
    /only trying to convey a point. Should have let it go.


  68. coldwarrior
    69 | January 18, 2013 4:42 pm

    @ heysoos:

    love it!

    gonna put in a bbq pit out there as well. should be pretty cool. the highest point will be about 10 feet above the ground, i’ll be able to get two ‘stories’ out of the main structure.


  69. Lily
    70 | January 18, 2013 4:42 pm

    @ unclassifiable:

    LOL! The swing set I was on didn’t come out but I went flying. So either way the results would have been bad! The things we did as kids!


  70. heysoos
    71 | January 18, 2013 4:43 pm

    citizen_q wrote:

    heysoos wrote:
    @ unclassifiable:
    we used to have BB gun wars…put on your winter jacket, gloves, diving mask etc…c’ya mom!

    Sling shots and acorns.

    remember when they invented the Wrist Rocket?…you could put out a window a block away!


  71. coldwarrior
    72 | January 18, 2013 4:44 pm

    heysoos wrote:

    coldwarrior wrote:
    @ unclassifiable:
    the suspension bridge will come off of the back deck (8 ft above the yard) and connect to the ‘treehouse’, build off from there.

    tre kewl…the ideas abound…I love that sort of stuff

    the suspension bridge will down go through the top of the grape trellis to the main structure. the vines will end up as part of the bridge.


  72. unclassifiable
    73 | January 18, 2013 4:46 pm

    @ citizen_q:

    Yeah. It was a piece of bamboo that we had shapened rubbing it on the street. My brother thew it at me and it was still dull and just left a bruise.

    Do you know one week later I had got that thing sharp enough that it stuck in my brothers scalp. He bled like Oswald shot him but, as with most head wounds it was a little superficial thing mom sealed with butterfly stitches.

    My mom and dad swore my brother and I had cement for heads.

    I think when they had my sister 10 years later it probably saved them from going bat-shit crazy and taking my brother and I for a “long ride”.


  73. Lily
    74 | January 18, 2013 4:47 pm

    RIX wrote:

    I agree with the post almost in total.
    my caveat is “Stranger Danger”.
    If you raise a girl he is not some abstraction, but a real threat.

    Oh my!!! My son and his wife just had another baby girl so now he has two girls. He has an edge ….he works as a correctional officer for the sheriff…he can do background checks. I’m sure he’ll be with them until he retires. His girls are going to have it rough with the boys with my son checking anyone out who is near them. ;)


  74. unclassifiable
    75 | January 18, 2013 4:47 pm

    @ coldwarrior:

    That is hellacious.

    Many years from now your kids will be talking about that.


  75. 76 | January 18, 2013 4:47 pm

    Lily wrote:

    unclassifiable wrote:
    @ Rodan:
    Rodan,
    I completely understand.
    I wanted kids but chose poorly for my wife and made the “waiting for the perfect time” mistake.
    It happens guy. There is no shame to this.
    Really sorry if I touched a nerve with Rodan or any other posters…I must really be off the mark today.

    You didn’t say one wrong thing, so far as I could see.


  76. coldwarrior
    77 | January 18, 2013 4:48 pm

    citizen_q wrote:

    heysoos wrote:
    @ unclassifiable:
    we used to have BB gun wars…put on your winter jacket, gloves, diving mask etc…c’ya mom!

    Sling shots and acorns.

    sling shots and buckeyes!


  77. 78 | January 18, 2013 4:48 pm

    The risk takers are and will be the leaders

    Not if the aristocrat’s parents have any say in the matter.


  78. heysoos
    79 | January 18, 2013 4:49 pm

    coldwarrior wrote:

    @ heysoos:
    love it!
    gonna put in a bbq pit out there as well. should be pretty cool. the highest point will be about 10 feet above the ground, i’ll be able to get two ‘stories’ out of the main structure.

    I really did all that stuff for myself…but I also wanted a cool, comfortable environment for my kids, a reason to stay home and hang out…in HS there were always kids parked way out there, sleeping off their long all nighters…they loved me, but of course I threatened each one with instant death if I discovered booze or dope usage on my property…then after I kill them, I’ll turn them over to their own parents…do what you want but don’t fuck with me…the whole concept worked like a dream


  79. heysoos
    80 | January 18, 2013 4:51 pm

    coldwarrior wrote:

    heysoos wrote:
    coldwarrior wrote:
    @ unclassifiable:
    the suspension bridge will come off of the back deck (8 ft above the yard) and connect to the ‘treehouse’, build off from there.
    tre kewl…the ideas abound…I love that sort of stuff

    the suspension bridge will down go through the top of the grape trellis to the main structure. the vines will end up as part of the bridge.

    your neighbors will think you’re nuts!


  80. RIX
    81 | January 18, 2013 4:51 pm

    One of my greatest memories of yoot is riding our bikes down
    toboggan slides in the Summer.
    a lot of the time the front wheel would scrape the side & you would
    fly over the handle bars.
    Good times!


  81. citizen_q
    82 | January 18, 2013 4:53 pm

    @ heysoos:
    Yes I do, and I still won’t talk about it. :-)


  82. RIX
    83 | January 18, 2013 4:54 pm

    @ Lily:
    Good for him. The great fear for a father is seeing a boy come up the driveway
    to date your daughter, that reminds you of yourself at the same age.


  83. coldwarrior
    84 | January 18, 2013 4:54 pm

    heysoos wrote:

    the suspension bridge will down go through the top of the grape trellis to the main structure. the vines will end up as part of the bridge.

    your neighbors will think you’re nuts!

    yep. and i dont care. this is gonna be pretty cool.


  84. Lily
    85 | January 18, 2013 4:54 pm

    @ Mike C.:

    :)


  85. Lily
    86 | January 18, 2013 4:58 pm

    RIX wrote:

    @ Lily:
    Good for him. The great fear for a father is seeing a boy come up the driveway
    to date your daughter, that reminds you of yourself at the same age.

    Oh I can just imagine what it is like for a father because they remember what they were thinking and like at that age about girls!
    /my husband has told me and I had two sons and two brothers! Surrounded by all males ….heck even my dog is a male!

    My son is probably going to suffer badly when they get older. Poor thing. ;)


  86. AZfederalist
    87 | January 18, 2013 4:58 pm

    coldwarrior wrote:

    @ unclassifiable:

    the suspension bridge will come off of the back deck (8 ft above the yard) and connect to the ‘treehouse’, build off from there.

    Our son has a former classmate whose dad built a zipline across the wash at the back of their property. It starts from a tree by the garage and is anchored to a stake across the wash. It goes about twenty feet above the wash at its highest point. At a gathering, even the parents were going across. Another of my son’s classmates was very tentative about going. She finally did because she didn’t want to look cowardly in front of one of the boy’s she liked who also happened to be there. After she finally got up here courage and did it, she came back saying, “If I had known that was all there was to it, I wouldn’t have made such a big deal about it.” (I remember thinking that is not the only time in her life she’ll use that line)


  87. citizen_q
    88 | January 18, 2013 5:02 pm

    Guggi wrote:

    If parents would raise their children like three/four/five decades ago they would be permantly in prison.

    I am thinking if I tried half the stunts I did as kid nowadays I would end up in prison.

    Heck in my state children in different parts of the state were suspended for playing shooting make believe finger guns (pointed index finger and thumb upright)


  88. heysoos
    89 | January 18, 2013 5:02 pm

    @ Lily:
    family dynamics are very interesting…my little almost three year old grandson runs into his baby sisters room when she cries to join the family after her nap…he’s decided already that nobody messes with his kid sister…it’s so charming…he even ‘reads’ to her…I get these vids and just about weep with joy and happiness


  89. Lily
    90 | January 18, 2013 5:05 pm

    @ citizen_q:

    Pure insanity!!! The world has gone nuts in my opinion. Boys will be boys! They like to play shoot’em up! Just the way it is.


  90. RIX
    91 | January 18, 2013 5:07 pm

    @ Lily:
    My wife & I always viewed the boyfriend differently.
    I think that I had a better handle on the situation.
    I told one boy that I didn’t like to get my daughter home on time i and intact.
    I really said this”I am having Agent Orange induced flashbacks & hearing
    helicopter blades.”


  91. heysoos
    92 | January 18, 2013 5:08 pm

    citizen_q wrote:

    Guggi wrote:
    If parents would raise their children like three/four/five decades ago they would be permantly in prison.

    I am thinking if I tried half the stunts I did as kid nowadays I would end up in prison.
    Heck in my state children in different parts of the state were suspended for playing shooting make believe finger guns (pointed index finger and thumb upright)

    I graduated from high school in 1970…we lived in a fairly rural area and I recall one buddy had a new Remington auto loader…he brought it to school to show it off, not inside but after classes in the parking lot…he brought a box of shells and we drove out to the football field and we all shot it…times change, and not always for the better


  92. Lily
    93 | January 18, 2013 5:08 pm

    @ heysoos:

    Awwwwwwww! How sweet! The oldest of the children is always the protector. I’m female and the oldest…no one messed with my brothers …unless it was me. I could call them idjets..no one else could though! (Normally the oldest is the protector there is always the exception to the rule).


  93. RIX
    94 | January 18, 2013 5:08 pm

    Lily wrote:

    @ citizen_q:

    Pure insanity!!! The world has gone nuts in my opinion. Boys will be boys! They like to play shoot’em up! Just the way it is.

    They should play cowboys & Muslims.


  94. Lily
    95 | January 18, 2013 5:09 pm

    @ RIX:

    OMG!!!!! How funny! :lol: :lol: :lol:


  95. unclassifiable
    96 | January 18, 2013 5:11 pm

    Good thing I did not go into the list of flammables and things we set on fire :o

    Like I said

    heads
    of
    cement


  96. citizen_q
    97 | January 18, 2013 5:13 pm

    Be back later.


  97. Lily
    98 | January 18, 2013 5:13 pm

    @ unclassifiable:

    Oh my word….the list is endless of stupid things boys do. Like “hey I’ll touch the electric fence if you do!!!”


  98. heysoos
    99 | January 18, 2013 5:14 pm

    @ Lily:
    yeppers, my oldest sister by five years watched over me like a hawk, my whole life actually…she’d go to the wall for me, and had no problem taking on boys…she was then and still is one tough sob…you don’t mess with her…she always reminded me (after the fact) of those gang girls in West Side Story…exact same thing@ RIX:
    good one


  99. RIX
    100 | January 18, 2013 5:16 pm

    @ Lily:
    It got the kids attention.


  100. Lily
    101 | January 18, 2013 5:17 pm

    @ heysoos:

    Now that is funny hey!!! There is one thing my brothers will not, I repeat will not piss me off in person…..oh no they will not go there…only over the phone thousands of miles away. It’s funny!!!! I will pop’em on the head. Yes sir. LOL!
    And I’m a little bitty thing…


  101. lobo91
    102 | January 18, 2013 5:19 pm

    An email I just received:

    It’s time to STAND AND FIGHT for freedom!

    That’s why I’m going on Sean Hannity’s show tonight for one full hour.

    If you want to hear the facts about gun control’s failures, and hear the truth about how NRA is fighting to make our families, homes, schools and communities safer, then I urge you to watch. If you can’t watch tonight, record it so you can watch it this weekend.

    And if you want to help NRA win the battle to protect the Second Amendment, please tell family, friends and fellow gun owners to watch as well.

    The nightmare battle that we’ve always feared is now at our doorstep, and the outcome of this battle boils down to arming every gun owner with the truth. Please help me do that by forwarding this email to as many gun owners as possible.

    Thank you for your friendship and support, and your steadfast loyalty to the cause of freedom.

    Wayne

    Wayne LaPierre
    Executive Vice President

    Should be an interesting show. They have a studio audience, and they’re doing part of the show from a gun range.


  102. RIX
    103 | January 18, 2013 5:20 pm

    heysoos wrote:

    @ Lily:
    yeppers, my oldest sister by five years watched over me like a hawk, my whole life actually…she’d go to the wall for me, and had no problem taking on boys…she was then and still is one tough sob…you don’t mess with her…she always reminded me (after the fact) of those gang girls in West Side Story…exact same thing@ RIX:
    good one

    Just the look on the kids face told me that I did exactly the right thing.


  103. heysoos
    104 | January 18, 2013 5:20 pm

    @ Lily:
    it’s the size of the fight…I adore my sister


  104. Lily
    105 | January 18, 2013 5:20 pm

    RIX wrote:

    @ Lily:
    It got the kids attention.

    My husband said if we had a daughter he would tell the boy, if his daughter wasn’t home and safe at a certain he would not, by any means mind finish serving out his time at Angola. Being he was on probation and all. ;)


  105. Guggi
    106 | January 18, 2013 5:22 pm

    citizen_q wrote:

    Heck in my state children in different parts of the state were suspended for playing shooting make believe finger guns (pointed index finger and thumb upright)

    Yup, the laws have changed dramatically. Parents are nowadays always in danger to stand with one foot in jail.


  106. unclassifiable
    107 | January 18, 2013 5:22 pm

    @ Lily:

    Mom and dad say the same thing when my brother and I reminisce:

    “I don’t want to hear this!!!!”


  107. Lily
    108 | January 18, 2013 5:22 pm

    heysoos wrote:

    @ Lily:
    it’s the size of the fight…I adore my sister

    LOL! My brothers like riling me up….but worry about me all the time. Me being sick had them all in a bad way.


  108. RIX
    109 | January 18, 2013 5:23 pm

    Lily wrote:

    RIX wrote:

    @ Lily:
    It got the kids attention.

    My husband said if we had a daughter he would tell the boy, if his daughter wasn’t home and safe at a certain he would not, by any means mind finish serving out his time at Angola. Being he was on probation and all.

    Kudos to your husband. That is a beautiful thing.


  109. RIX
    110 | January 18, 2013 5:25 pm

    I hope that it doesn’t become public that I was having an affair
    with Manti Te’os girlfriend.


  110. Lily
    111 | January 18, 2013 5:26 pm

    unclassifiable wrote:

    @ Lily:
    Mom and dad say the same thing when my brother and I reminisce:
    “I don’t want to hear this!!!!”

    I knew what my sons were doing! I’d say if I was you I wouldn’t do that!!!! They never listened. Told my son who was throwing a baseball up and down he was going to hit himself in the eye. He said he never misses …the next throw he missed and hit himself in the eye. See? I said Momma knows what she is talking about.


  111. Lily
    112 | January 18, 2013 5:27 pm

    RIX wrote:

    I hope that it doesn’t become public that I was having an affair
    with Manti Te’os girlfriend.

    Oh my! :shock:
    LOL!
    /Rix ….Saturday you’ll have to go to confession now!


  112. Lily
    113 | January 18, 2013 5:28 pm

    RIX wrote:

    Lily wrote:
    RIX wrote:
    @ Lily:
    It got the kids attention.
    My husband said if we had a daughter he would tell the boy, if his daughter wasn’t home and safe at a certain he would not, by any means mind finish serving out his time at Angola. Being he was on probation and all.
    Kudos to your husband. That is a beautiful thing.

    LOL!
    Almost brings a tear to your eye and all. *sniff*


  113. RIX
    114 | January 18, 2013 5:28 pm

    Lily wrote:

    RIX wrote:

    I hope that it doesn’t become public that I was having an affair
    with Manti Te’os girlfriend.

    Oh my!
    LOL!
    /Rix ….Saturday you’ll have to go to confession now!

    No,it was a good thing.


  114. RIX
    115 | January 18, 2013 5:29 pm

    @ Lily:
    Yup, gets me all misty.


  115. heysoos
    116 | January 18, 2013 5:29 pm

    unclassifiable wrote:

    @ Lily:
    Mom and dad say the same thing when my brother and I reminisce:
    “I don’t want to hear this!!!!”

    my two sisters used to fight like cats, physically brawl…my dad would yell girls! GIRLS!!…take it outside please…he didn’t give a shit if they beat the snot out of each other


  116. Lily
    117 | January 18, 2013 5:31 pm

    RIX wrote:

    Lily wrote:
    RIX wrote:
    I hope that it doesn’t become public that I was having an affair
    with Manti Te’os girlfriend.
    Oh my!
    LOL!
    /Rix ….Saturday you’ll have to go to confession now!
    No,it was a good thing.

    LOL! LOL! LOL!


  117. Lily
    118 | January 18, 2013 5:32 pm

    @ RIX:

    :lol:


  118. unclassifiable
    119 | January 18, 2013 5:53 pm

    @ Lily:
    @ RIX:

    Being that my sister was 10 years younger than me and 8 years younger than my brother, he turned over boyfriend duty to “the heathens”.

    We were a bit rough around the edges sort of speak. I had moved out but my brother was still living at home with what was known at the time as a “Class C” firearms license.

    Invariably he would be cleaning his arsenal when a new prospecive courtier showed up.

    My observation was that this had sort of a chilling effect on the whole procedings.


  119. eaglesoars
    120 | January 18, 2013 6:20 pm

    What I find most interesting is the competetiveness among parents. ESPECIALLY mothers. The kids are tokens/trophies. I think this is due to an increase in narccissism which -- IMHO -- is a direct result of the self-esteem ‘movement’.


  120. 121 | January 18, 2013 6:22 pm

    I dated a girl in High School whose father was a former Luftwaffe pilot who was shot down and did time in a POW camp over here. After the war, he stayed and worked at his real profession, as a chemical engineer. He was classically “German looking”, with a rather pronounced upper lip and, of course a heavy accent. True to form, they had a German Shepherd named “Wolf”, which he pronounced “Vulf”.

    I found talking to him fascinating, he regaled me with stories and I learned a lot about the war, from the other side. He even showed me his uniform. That said, he scared the crap outta me and, as a result, I treated his daughter with the utmost care and respect.


  121. eaglesoars
    122 | January 18, 2013 6:24 pm

    Oh, another point that hasn’t been brought up is that women with careers are a fairly recent phenomenom. Moms with full time jobs have exhausting lives. How many of us had stay-at-home moms? I’ll bet most of us. Which is why they had no problem kicking our butts out the door every day -- who wants to be in a house full of screaming banshees? Today, working moms feel guilt and over-compensate I think.


  122. yenta-fada
    123 | January 18, 2013 6:24 pm

    @ Lily:

    Lily, this issue of having kids has a LOT to do with where you live. Do you know the AVERAGE home in Toronto is almost $300,000? Our mortgages were never tax deductible items. I’m old. We just paid our mortgage off three years ago. You cannot compare your experience to the one of people who live in urban centers because THAT is precisely where the jobs are.


  123. 124 | January 18, 2013 6:27 pm

    eaglesoars wrote:

    What I find most interesting is the competetiveness among parents. ESPECIALLY mothers. The kids are tokens/trophies. I think this is due to an increase in narccissism which — IMHO — is a direct result of the self-esteem ‘movement’.

    These kids we are talking about are the grandchildren of Baby Boomers (my generation), so the narcissism is well into the second and third generation.


  124. heysoos
    125 | January 18, 2013 6:30 pm

    @ MacDuff:
    so..let’s talk about me!


  125. eaglesoars
    126 | January 18, 2013 6:31 pm

    And conveniently, Glenn Reynolds has a link up to an article he wrote. He quotes from To Hell With All That: Loving and Loathing Our Inner Housewife

    “My mother was by no means indifferent about me: I was her pet, the baby of the family. But back then children were not under constant adult supervision, even if their mothers were housewives. By the time I was five, I was allowed to wander away from the house as long as I didn’t cross any big streets. I had the run of the neighborhood at six. . . . A nine-year-old could be trusted with a key; a nine-year-old knew how to work a telephone if anything went wrong. Moreover, anxiety as a precondition of the maternal experience had not yet been invented.”

    There’s also the decline in parental prestige over generations. My mother reports that when she was a newlywed (she was married in 1959) you weren’t seen as fully a member of the adult world until you had kids.


  126. song_and_dance_man
    127 | January 18, 2013 6:31 pm

    Good article.

    When I was growing up most of the kids on the block played outside. Weekends and summer break were spent wandering not only the local neighborhood and playing with other kids blocks away, but also the many factories that surrounded us. I grew up in The City of Industry and it lived up to it’s name. We would eat breakfast and weren’t expected to come home until lunch and then would return again when it got close to dusk. The story is correct that this is not seen anymore. Except where I now live. The street I live on is like back in the day, with all the kids on the block playing together in the streets or in various yards. It’s a young neighborhood that is a collection of about 20 or so cul-de-sacs with only two access streets so traffic-wise it’s a safe play zone for the children and I have a feeling that is the reason for this little seen and almost long gone activity.


  127. 128 | January 18, 2013 6:34 pm

    eaglesoars wrote:

    Oh, another point that hasn’t been brought up is that women with careers are a fairly recent phenomenom. Moms with full time jobs have exhausting lives. How many of us had stay-at-home moms? I’ll bet most of us. Which is why they had no problem kicking our butts out the door every day — who wants to be in a house full of screaming banshees? Today, working moms feel guilt and over-compensate I think.

    My mother served in the Navy during WWII and, after the war, went to work building a career (quite unique in those days). I was a “latch key” kid at a very early age because both of my parents were at work when I got home from school. When I got home, I had a list of responsibilities and I wouldn’t have wanted to grow up any other way -- I always felt rather “special”.


  128. yenta-fada
    129 | January 18, 2013 6:34 pm

    Our crazy ex-neighbors had two daughters who wore helmets whenever they first got on trikes, then on bikes. They looked like trolls to begin with. The helmets made them look like Martians. They called the nanny the “caregiver” and had a diaper service early on. Serious yuppie derangement syndrome.


  129. heysoos
    130 | January 18, 2013 6:36 pm

    @ song_and_dance_man:
    I’m happy for you…it’s a struggle to get it right, then hope for the best…not many kids here in the North Valley hood where I live…a few and they all seem well mannered and happy…but this is old area, and doesn’t seem much changed for a hundred years…hope your boy is doing well


  130. song_and_dance_man
    131 | January 18, 2013 6:38 pm

    @ MacDuff:
    eaglesoars makes a fine point about both parents working these days that adds to the article.

    The point about being latch key is also important to consider. Nowadays one could be in jeopardy of being visited by Social Service type people who think kids being home alone is a crime. My mom also worked and us kids were left home alone all the time during the summer months. It was no big deal to us, my parents and the neighbors.


  131. heysoos
    132 | January 18, 2013 6:39 pm

    @ MacDuff:
    that’s when and why they invented Beef-O-Roni, and I’ve been eating it ever since


  132. Bumr50
    133 | January 18, 2013 6:40 pm

    @ yenta-fada:


  133. heysoos
    134 | January 18, 2013 6:40 pm

    @ yenta-fada:
    funny…people are goofy


  134. song_and_dance_man
    135 | January 18, 2013 6:42 pm

    @ heysoos:
    My son is not one of the kids playing in the streets. He already in college. I was talking about the neighbors. Plus here in ABQ the crime rate is low. I don’t even lock my door unless I’m going to work or bed. Go shopping for a couple of hours? No prob.


  135. song_and_dance_man
    136 | January 18, 2013 6:45 pm

    yenta-fada wrote:

    Serious yuppie derangement syndrome.

    That’s funny. My brother raised his kids that way too. His wife is a paranoid control freak. She even taught my nephew to sit on the toilet even if he had to just pee.


  136. yenta-fada
    137 | January 18, 2013 6:46 pm

    @ Bumr50:

    Hahahahaha. Now make them ugly with family money and no skills, and, yep, those were the neighbours. (I forgot the part about them calling the police on us because they claimed we were parking (2 inches) on their property.) She was running an small elite daycare service on our property. The police measured. We weren’t on their property with our car.
    ARRRGH. City life.


  137. song_and_dance_man
    138 | January 18, 2013 6:48 pm

    @ Bumr50:

    That CAN’T be real. Is it from SNL or some other parody show?


  138. eaglesoars
    139 | January 18, 2013 6:48 pm

    MacDuff wrote:

    I was a “latch key” kid at a very early age

    Ok, but do you think my generalization is on point? We were latch key kids, too, but not until high school. Mom worked part time in retail. Our job when we got home was to get dinner started and on the table, put all the laundry away and get a damn good headstart on the homework. Post-dinner clean up was ours and lights out was at 10.

    I think for your time and place, your situation was more rare than common?


  139. yenta-fada
    140 | January 18, 2013 6:49 pm

    song_and_dance_man wrote:

    yenta-fada wrote:
    Serious yuppie derangement syndrome.
    That’s funny. My brother raised his kids that way too. His wife is a paranoid control freak. She even taught my nephew to sit on the toilet even if he had to just pee.

    I’m sure “paranoid control freak” is not a mental illness. Looking normal to me.


  140. coldwarrior
    141 | January 18, 2013 6:50 pm

    i was raised under the watchful eyes of many italian nanas. none of us dared to do anything to draw their attention and ire!


  141. eaglesoars
    142 | January 18, 2013 6:51 pm

    @ Bumr50:

    CATALOGS??!! She hasn’t figured out the innernut on her Mac? Knuckledraggers.


  142. yenta-fada
    143 | January 18, 2013 6:52 pm

    song_and_dance_man wrote:

    @ heysoos:
    My son is not one of the kids playing in the streets. He already in college. I was talking about the neighbors. Plus here in ABQ the crime rate is low. I don’t even lock my door unless I’m going to work or bed. Go shopping for a couple of hours? No prob.

    We had two break-ins with property stolen and vandalized and one car that disappeared until the police found it a week later. See….normal.


  143. heysoos
    144 | January 18, 2013 6:52 pm

    @ coldwarrior:
    so that explains the skirt and perfect nails…I wondered


  144. song_and_dance_man
    145 | January 18, 2013 6:55 pm

    yenta-fada wrote:

    I’m sure “paranoid control freak” is not a mental illness. Looking normal to me.

    Well of course not with almost ever one nowadays hyper-sensitive to boogiemen. It’s us that are now abnormal.


  145. song_and_dance_man
    146 | January 18, 2013 6:56 pm

    @ coldwarrior:
    Just how many nanas did you own? I only had two.


  146. song_and_dance_man
    147 | January 18, 2013 6:58 pm

    HA. Ol’ Mayor Nagin indicted on 21 felony counts. The DA is undoubtedly a racist.


  147. heysoos
    148 | January 18, 2013 6:59 pm

    Texas chili to kill for…
    I’m a genius…I should be a millionaire


  148. yenta-fada
    149 | January 18, 2013 7:00 pm

    Everybody wants to be like the celebrities. (a re-post, but on topic)

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2258005/Jay-Z-Beyonces-daughter-1million-nursery-suite-New-Yorks-Barclays-Center.html


  149. heysoos
    151 | January 18, 2013 7:01 pm

    song_and_dance_man wrote:

    HA. Ol’ Mayor Nagin indicted on 21 felony counts. The DA is undoubtedly a racist.

    and a couple of guys have already gone down…
    c’ya, wouldn’t want to be ya


  150. song_and_dance_man
    152 | January 18, 2013 7:04 pm

    bbl later. going shopping and I’m not locking the front door.


  151. citizen_q
    153 | January 18, 2013 7:06 pm

    @ yenta-fada:
    Used to ride my bicycle a lot, even after I had my driver’s license. I loved it. One day on one of my usual routes I was going at a pretty good speed a dog ran at me from between 2 cars into the road where I was riding. From his distance, angle of attack and our combined speed, he had me. I don’t think I could have stopped my bike in time and dismounted in time to put it between me and the dog. I got the bright idea that if he was attacking me and I could not avoid it I would turn the tables.

    I steered into him, which he did not expect, so I T’d him, hitting him somewhere in the middle of his body. Of course this chocked the front wheel stopping it and the bike, but not me. I flew over the handles and landed in someone’s front yard. The yard had a nice lawn and was rather soft, but I hit my head good enough that I saw stars and started to have a pretty good head-ache as I picked my self up and looked around for the dog who was nowhere to been seen.

    I collected myself, thought about would could have happened if I wasn’t so very lucky to have landed in a relatively soft well maintained yard.

    My bike unbelievably was undamaged, so I rode it home. Put it up. Got in my car. Went to the bike shop and bought my first bike helmet. I wear a helmet whenever I ride my bike. I make sure my wife wears a helmet too when she rides. I guess if I had kids I’d make sure they wore one as well. There are risks in everything. Balanced against the risks of a head injury, my decision is to wear one and make sure those I care about do so as well. Your mileage may vary.

    Never did see that dog again. Even when I rode that same route the next day. Maybe he did not recognise me in that goofy helmet.


  152. heysoos
    154 | January 18, 2013 7:07 pm

    I dig toy pianos, don’t you?


  153. yenta-fada
    156 | January 18, 2013 7:08 pm

    song_and_dance_man wrote:

    bbl later. going shopping and I’m not locking the front door.

    Irresponsible. /


  154. 157 | January 18, 2013 7:09 pm

    New Thread.


  155. yenta-fada
    158 | January 18, 2013 7:11 pm

    @ citizen_q:

    We have to wear them by law in Toronto streets, but NOT when you are a little kid riding on your trike on the sidewalk accompanied by a parent.


  156. coldwarrior
    159 | January 18, 2013 7:12 pm

    song_and_dance_man wrote:

    @ coldwarrior:
    Just how many nanas did you own? I only had two.

    jeeze, there were at least 10! the italian granma’s of my friends were like watchdogs! i was surrounded!


  157. coldwarrior
  158. 161 | January 18, 2013 7:16 pm

    eaglesoars wrote:

    Ok, but do you think my generalization is on point? We were latch key kids, too, but not until high school. Mom worked part time in retail. Our job when we got home was to get dinner started and on the table, put all the laundry away and get a damn good headstart on the homework. Post-dinner clean up was ours and lights out was at 10.

    I think for your time and place, your situation was more rare than common?

    Absolutely, your point was well made. It was a different time, every situation is different and mine was quite rare, particularly for the day.


  159. citizen_q
    162 | January 18, 2013 7:17 pm

    yenta-fada wrote:

    Everybody wants to be like the celebrities. (a re-post, but on topic)
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2258005/Jay-Z-Beyonces-daughter-1million-nursery-suite-New-Yorks-Barclays-Center.html

    These are the same people hobnobbin with comrade zero lecturing us about the rich needing to pay their fair share?


  160. citizen_q
    163 | January 18, 2013 7:21 pm

    yenta-fada wrote:

    @ citizen_q:
    We have to wear them by law in Toronto streets, but NOT when you are a little kid riding on your trike on the sidewalk accompanied by a parent.

    LOL! I just realized my next door neighbors do the same thing with their little girls on their tricycles!

    Yes, I guess that is a bit much, but they are careful doting parents. I never gave it much of a second thought. I had always been impressed with the care and attention the devote on their children. They both work, so I know that isn’t easy.


  161. citizen_q
    164 | January 18, 2013 7:25 pm

    @ coldwarrior:
    When we moved into our new house when I was 6 my parents after introducing themselves and us deputized all the other the with the power to give us a spanking if they ever caught us misbehaving.

    Dad said if I have troubled them enough they felt I needed a spanking he would give me a second one.

    Somehow that I never tested that rule.


  162. Bumr50
    165 | January 18, 2013 7:25 pm

    @ yenta-fada:
    @ song_and_dance_man:
    @ eaglesoars:

    It’s a clip from the movie ‘Best in Show.”

    It’s funny.


  163. yenta-fada
    166 | January 18, 2013 7:26 pm

    citizen_q wrote:

    yenta-fada wrote:
    @ citizen_q:
    We have to wear them by law in Toronto streets, but NOT when you are a little kid riding on your trike on the sidewalk accompanied by a parent.
    LOL! I just realized my next door neighbors do the same thing with their little girls on their tricycles!
    Yes, I guess that is a bit much, but they are careful doting parents. I never gave it much of a second thought. I had always been impressed with the care and attention the devote on their children. They both work, so I know that isn’t easy.

    That IS funny. I bet they don’t trim the lawn with scissors after mowing the garden though. Really, nutty does have a context.


  164. coldwarrior
    167 | January 18, 2013 7:29 pm

    citizen_q wrote:

    @ coldwarrior:
    When we moved into our new house when I was 6 my parents after introducing themselves and us deputized all the other the with the power to give us a spanking if they ever caught us misbehaving.
    Dad said if I have troubled them enough they felt I needed a spanking he would give me a second one.
    Somehow that I never tested that rule.

    exactly what happened to me at age 7! and before that at our old neighborhood as well!


  165. citizen_q
    168 | January 18, 2013 7:39 pm

    yenta-fada wrote:

    That IS funny. I bet they don’t trim the lawn with scissors after mowing the garden though. Really, nutty does have a context.

    Nope! They are not wound that tight.


  166. darkwords
    169 | January 18, 2013 7:43 pm

    I’d say today that you want to get your kids into marital arts.

    Martial Arts, School, music, art. Expose them to all four in a building block method. My nephew came home worried about global warming. The teachers made him anxious about storms. He thinks the world might not exist in 20 years.


  167. citizen_q
    170 | January 18, 2013 7:56 pm

    @ darkwords:
    It’s obama and his merry band of socialists that your nephew needs to be afraid of.


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