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The Texas growth machine is no mirage

by Speranza ( 126 Comments › )
Filed under Business, Economy, Regulation, taxation, unemployment at February 12th, 2013 - 7:00 am

Keep taxes low, regulations fair and predictable, and stand back and watch the jobs created. If you have ambition, confidence, and “know-how” – go to Texas!

by Wendell Cox

The American economy has had little to cheer about since the 2008 financial meltdown and the resulting recession. Recovery has been feeble, and many states continue to struggle. One bright spot in the general gloom, however, is Texas, which began shining long before 2008. Not only has Texas created jobs at a stunning rate; it has also—pace critics like the New York Times’s Paul Krugman—created lots of good jobs. Indeed, the rest of the nation could turn to the Lone Star State as a model for dynamic growth, as a close look at employment data shows.

The first thing to point out is that Texan job creation has far outpaced the national average. The number of jobs in Texas has grown by a truly impressive 31.5 percent since 1995, compared with just 12 percent nationwide, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data (see Figure One). Texas has also lapped California, an important economic rival and the only state with a larger population. The Texas employment situation after the financial crisis was far less spectacular, of course, with the number of jobs growing just 2.4 percent from 2009 through 2011. But that was still six times the anemic 0.4 percent growth rate of the overall American economy.

The National Establishment Time-Series (NETS) Database, which provides detailed information on job creation and loss for firms headquartered in each state, can tell us more about Texas’s employment growth. NETS data are divided into two periods—the first from 1995 to 2002, the second from 2002 to 2009. During the 2002–09 period, small businesses of fewer than ten employees were the Texas employment engine, adding nearly 800,000 new jobs; of those, about three-quarters were in firms with two to nine employees, as Figure Two indicates. Larger Texas companies—those with 500 or more employees—lost a significant number of jobs over this span, and medium-size firms likewise shrank, trends that also showed up on the national level.

Figure Three, shifting back to Bureau of Labor Statistics data, shows that many of the new Texas jobs paid well. Indeed, Texas did comparatively better than the rest of the United States from 2002 through 2011. For industries paying over 150 percent of the average American wage, Texas could claim 216,000 extra jobs; the rest of the country added 495,000. In other words, the Lone Star State, with 8 percent of the U.S. population, created nearly a third of the country’s highest-paying positions. Texas also added 49,000 positions paying 125 percent to 150 percent of the U.S. average; the rest of the country lost 174,000 jobs in that category. As Figure Four shows, two sectors in which Texas employment did particularly well during the same period were natural-resource extraction (in fact, the state gained 80 percent of all new jobs in the country in that field) and professional, scientific, and technical positions. [........]Texas did lose 10,000 construction jobs, but that was a modest downturn, in light of the massive national slowdown in building caused by the crisis of 2008.

Vital to the economic health of Texas is that people are moving to its cities in droves. In 2011, Houston surpassed Philadelphia in population and became the country’s fifth-biggest metropolitan region, with 6.1 million people. Dallas–Fort Worth, with 6.5 million, was already the country’s fourth-biggest.  [.........]

Though the national downturn has slowed job creation in Texas’s cities, they’re still adding jobs, sometimes briskly, unlike many other American metropolitan regions (see Figure Five). Austin’s strong information-technology sector and government-related work (the city is Texas’s state capital) helped propel 4.3 percent job growth from 2009 through 2011 (and 15.3 percent growth from 2002 through 2009). The number of jobs in McAllen, which benefits from increased trade with Mexico under the North American Free Trade Agreement, grew 3.7 percent.  [.......]

What accounts for the resilience of the Texas economy, which has outperformed the rest of the country not only over the long term but during the Great Recession as well? A pro-business climate has unquestionably been a substantial advantage. In its annual ranking of business environments, Chief Executive has named Texas the most growth-friendly state for eight years in a row. (California has been last for the same eight years.) The reasons included low taxes and sensible regulations; a high-quality workforce (Texas ranked second only to Utah in that category in 2012); and a pleasant living environment (an eighth-place finish, slightly below sixth-place Florida but, perhaps surprisingly, far better than 28th-place California).

Part of the explanation for the high living-environment score is doubtless Texas’s low cost of living. In 2011, the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis put Texas’s “regional price parity,” a measurement of the price level of goods in an area, at 97.1, a bit lower than the national level of 100 and far lower than the California level of 114.8. Adjusted for cost of living, Texas’s per-capita income is higher than California’s and nearly as high as New York’s. Factor in state and local taxes, and Texas pulls ahead of New York.

More than three-quarters of the cost-of-living difference between Texas and California can be explained by housing costs. As Figure Six shows, Texas mostly dodged the real-estate bubble of the 2000s: the affordability of houses in large metro areas spiked in America as a whole but rose only modestly in Texas. A major reason that Texas real estate is so affordable is that the state lacks the draconian land-use restrictions that drive California housing prices into the stratosphere.  [......]

All these considerations suggest that Texas is poised for further growth. And a final reason for Texans to be optimistic is that a major expansion of the Panama Canal will be completed in 2014. That could bolster the Lone Star State’s success by rerouting Asian commerce from West Coast ports to Texas alternatives, which are closer to the nation’s major markets.

Read the rest – The Texas growth machine

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126 Responses to “The Texas growth machine is no mirage”
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  1. 1 | February 12, 2013 7:13 am

    The fifty states have been referred to as “Laboratories of Democracy”. Each one experiments according to its nature and the will of its people, and the results are visible for all to see. In econoics (and political economy) we have two glaring differences between the State of Calfornia and the State of Texas. Texas is Republican, small gopvernment, and fiscal sanity. Californis is Democrat, big government, and fiscal irresponsibility. One of thes has grown throught the Great Recession, and one has high unemployment. But hey, California ha great welfare rolls.


  2. coldwarrior
    2 | February 12, 2013 7:43 am

    personal liberty, smaller govt, state’s rights.

    works every time its tried.


  3. 3 | February 12, 2013 7:52 am

    I beg the forgiveness of the Forum, but I wanted to quickly interject this….

    Good apply Morning and happy Fat Tuesday to all! Live it up today, for tomorrow is Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent, a six week period of self-denial and solemn reflection and penance in preparation for Easter. Catholics everywhere (and some other denominations) will be displaying ashen crosses on their foreheads as a sign of repentance, but this isn’t directed solely to Catholics.

    So many of our holidays are marked by feasting and gastronomical indulgence that rituals of physical denial such as Lent have all but been lost in many quarters, alas.

    Think about something PHYSICAL- smoking, sweets, fast food, alcohol, etc., from which you could/should abstain for six weeks (or permanently for particularly destructive habits) and replace it with something more SPIRITUAL- reflection, prayer, charity, reading theological texts, etc.

    When you get up tomorrow morning, begin your abstinence by replacing your physical gratification with some sort of spiritual fulfillment or penance for past transgressions. Reenforce yourself during periods of weakness with quiet reflection and prayer. DENY THE ANIMAL, FEED THE SPIRITUAL.

    Think about it today and try it with me tomorrow if you like. The Easter season is one of the sorrow of death, followed by the rejoicing of rebirth and renewal, and we could all use a bit of renewal, right?

    Have a wonderful day.


  4. 4 | February 12, 2013 7:55 am

    Iron Fist wrote:

    California has great welfare rolls.

    And one nasty looking muffin top.


  5. Fritz Katz
    5 | February 12, 2013 8:00 am

    loss of personal liberty, larger govt.

    works every time its tried.

    The Venezuelan Train Crash

    Economics: Venezuela has devalued its currency, joining Iran, Argentina and others whose wars on math brought the same result. Some call this a “restorative.” It’s not. It’s what happens when big government hits a wall. …. terrified consumers who are buying goods ahead of expectations of soaring prices, while the poor have seen their life savings wiped out. …. With Venezuela’s impoverished population already spending 80% of their income on food, the frenzy in the shops is nothing but a race against starvation in a nation whose destructive Cuban-directed socialist agrarian policies ensure that the country can no longer grow food and must rely on imports. …. In the final run, it can lead to burning capitals, riots in the streets, and an end to a dictatorship. If it happens to Venezuela, the country can color itself lucky.

    I’m reminded of a joke about a headline we’ll soon see in our MFM newspapers: “End of the World — Women, Poor, Minorities Hardest Hit!”.


  6. 6 | February 12, 2013 8:03 am

    Gallup Poll: a majority of Americans disapprove of Obama’s gun control policies.

    For those who don’t want to click through, it is 54-42 in our favor. Obama won’t listen, but I hope the GOP is. opposing Obama on gun control is the right thing to do, and it is also the politically favorable thing to do. I have no intention of watching the State of the Union speech tonight. I didn’t typically watch them during the Bush years. Why would I subject myself to Obama? We know basically what he is going to say.


  7. Guggi
    7 | February 12, 2013 8:07 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    And people internal migrating from NYC or California will change Texas into the same sh*thole the came from. They always do it.


  8. 8 | February 12, 2013 8:13 am

    Iron Fist wrote:

    The fifty states have been referred to as “Laboratories of Democracy”. Each one experiments according to its nature and the will of its people, and the results are visible for all to see. In econoics (and political economy) we have two glaring differences between the State of Calfornia and the State of Texas. Texas is Republican, small gopvernment, and fiscal sanity. Californis is Democrat, big government, and fiscal irresponsibility. One of thes has grown throught the Great Recession, and one has high unemployment. But hey, California ha great welfare rolls.

    That’s an excellent point! We have the luxury of 50 experiments being simultaneously conducted into the most efficient and effective use of government and the financing thereof. Needless to say, different states have different demographics and one size does not necessarily fit all, but the wealth of options and possible combinations of policies is enormous.

    That said, California and Texas have very similar demographics and the fact that they’re heading in opposite directions clearly shows that California’s crisis is not only economic, it’s systemic and it their abject arrogance precludes them from altering their failed system.


  9. coldwarrior
    9 | February 12, 2013 8:17 am

    @ MacDuff:

    a link for you on orthodox fasting.

    from here


  10. coldwarrior
    10 | February 12, 2013 8:25 am

    Guggi wrote:

    @ Iron Fist:
    And people internal migrating from NYC or California will change Texas into the same sh*thole the came from. They always do it.

    texas was democrat until the 80′s.

    now its red. looks like all of those non-texans who moved there helped them move to the right.

    :lol:


  11. 11 | February 12, 2013 8:26 am

    @ MacDuff:

    That was a nice thought for a Fat Tuesday. Not my thing, mind you, but a nice thought anyway.


  12. 12 | February 12, 2013 8:28 am

    @ Guggi:

    Maybe the Republicans should try to win those voters over. NY was a swing state until the 90′s. Then the GOP stop trying to win new voters.


  13. huckfunn
  14. coldwarrior
    14 | February 12, 2013 8:29 am

    @ Rodan:

    cali, connecticut and nj were republican


  15. 15 | February 12, 2013 8:30 am

    @ coldwarrior:

    Maybe Republicans should try to win over new voters. Its just a thought. I laugh how the Party that supposedly supports Free Markets, hates having to compete for new voters. I guess their free market competition principles do not apply to politics.


  16. 16 | February 12, 2013 8:30 am

    @ coldwarrior:

    Up until 92, when the GOP became a Rural based party and told the Suburbs to FOAD.


  17. coldwarrior
    17 | February 12, 2013 8:32 am

    Rodan wrote:

    @ coldwarrior:
    Maybe Republicans should try to win over new voters. Its just a thought. I laugh how the Party that supposedly supports Free Markets, hates having to compete for new voters. I guess their free market competition principles do not apply to politics.

    smaller govt! mais non, mon ami!

    the gop leaders love the largess of larger govt just as much as the dems. if the new fiscons can take aver we will win back what we have lost.

    bush -- doubles the deficit! now that is no way to be a republican.


  18. coldwarrior
    18 | February 12, 2013 8:34 am

    huckfunn wrote:

    @ coldwarrior:
    Rick Perry California Tour: Governor Heads To San Francisco To Lure Business Owners To Texas. Be sure and watch the vid.

    i love that. go into the home of the beast and rip its heart out!


  19. 19 | February 12, 2013 8:34 am

    coldwarrior wrote:

    @ MacDuff:

    a link for you on orthodox fasting.

    from here

    Very interesting and informative, thanks, CW!


  20. coldwarrior
    20 | February 12, 2013 8:36 am

    if correlation were causation i could say that the influx of yankees into texas has made texas vote gop

    scroll down to the graph


  21. coldwarrior
    21 | February 12, 2013 8:36 am

    MacDuff wrote:

    coldwarrior wrote:
    @ MacDuff:
    a link for you on orthodox fasting.
    from here

    Very interesting and informative, thanks, CW!

    youbetcha.


  22. Guggi
    22 | February 12, 2013 8:40 am

    coldwarrior wrote:

    texas was democrat until the 80′s.

    Democrats then were much more moderate than now and the influx of significant internal migration can change anything. I don’t know why but even when people admit that certain rules and taxes have made their living impossible back “home” they want the same rules and taxes in their new home. It’s the same in Europe.


  23. Guggi
    23 | February 12, 2013 8:41 am

    Rodan wrote:

    @ Guggi:
    Maybe the Republicans should try to win those voters over. NY was a swing state until the 90′s. Then the GOP stop trying to win new voters.

    How ? Becoming “Democrats light” ?


  24. huckfunn
    24 | February 12, 2013 8:41 am

    coldwarrior wrote:

    huckfunn wrote:

    @ coldwarrior:
    Rick Perry California Tour: Governor Heads To San Francisco To Lure Business Owners To Texas. Be sure and watch the vid.

    i love that. go into the home of the beast and rip its heart out!

    Austin is already a high tech jobs center. Cicsco, Dell, Intel, AMD and many others have a large presence here. Also, UT is a large research center for various sciences and industries. I think Guv Rick will have a successful hunting trip.


  25. 25 | February 12, 2013 8:45 am

    @ Guggi:

    By going back to how they were in the 80′s. They were Socially Libertarian allowing differences on social issues, appealed to suburbanites by believing in Economic freedom and was not into nation building.

    Look at the electoral map Pre 92 and You will see something changed.


  26. Guggi
    26 | February 12, 2013 8:52 am

    Rodan wrote:

    @ Guggi:
    By going back to how they were in the 80′s. They were Socially Libertarian allowing differences on social issues, appealed to suburbanites by believing in Economic freedom and was not into nation building.
    Look at the electoral map Pre 92 and You will see something changed.

    Times have changed. People are now into diversity and their right to entitlements. You have to educate them before you can “change back to the 80′s”. And even then I doubt it.


  27. coldwarrior
    27 | February 12, 2013 8:55 am

    @ Guggi:

    i dont buy the myth that people from the north are making the south more democrat. there is zero evidence to support this theory.

    if anything, those who moved are more fiscon and libertarian and were not reliant on handouts from the govt. see the drain of the gop out of the north in the 80′s. i know people who moved to north carolina who were union-democrats and are now solid gop voters.

    if we just look at voting records and migration since, oh say 1968, there is almost perfect correlation to show that gop/right voters moved out of the north and into the south, turning the north blue and the south red. it is far more complicated than that tho. what the evidence does not support is that people who moved south took some sort of left wing vision with them and are trying to impose it on the south. there is no evidence for it.


  28. coldwarrior
    28 | February 12, 2013 8:59 am

    Guggi wrote:

    Times have changed. People are now into diversity and their right to entitlements. You have to educate them before you can “change back to the 80′s”. And even then I doubt it.

    this sint the first time the nation has turned to the left and became a ward of the state. wont be the last either. the political pendulum swings, it swings relentlessly and perpetually.

    america in the early century went form progressivism to capitalism to socialism in 3 decades.

    we are just coming off of almost 20 years of capitalism under reagan and clinton. the pendulum swings.


  29. RIX
    29 | February 12, 2013 9:01 am

    Good morning.here is an example of strict Chicago gun laws.
    Michael Ward the gang banger that shot & killed Hadiya Pendleton was
    on probation for a weapons violation.While out he was arrested for three
    violations of break ins & trespassing, before the shooting.


  30. Mars
    30 | February 12, 2013 9:01 am

    Well this article helps explain why the Soros machine is obsessed with turning TX into a blue or swing state. They see something good and want to destroy it.


  31. Guggi
    31 | February 12, 2013 9:02 am

    There is a great danger in every Western (style) country with democratic principles: people don’t like responsibilites but like to transfer power to the state. Democratic principles are not sexy but boring and exhausting. In sociology you learn (yes, I know it’s “sociology” OmG :-) ) rules have always be chnaged by (middle class) people who were bored by the existing rules and norms.


  32. Mars
    32 | February 12, 2013 9:05 am

    Guggi wrote:

    There is a great danger in every Western (style) country with democratic principles: people don’t like responsibilites but like to transfer power to the state. Democratic principles are not sexy but boring and exhausting. In sociology you learn (yes, I know it’s “sociology” OmG ) rules have always be chnaged by (middle class) people who were bored by the existing rules and norms.

    Unfortunately then sociology violates the key principle of education and proceeds to tell you how they feel the changes should happen.

    (Even out here sociology might as well be called socialism 101. I couldn’t tolerate the blatant Sanger worship and wound up ditching a week.)


  33. 33 | February 12, 2013 9:06 am

    Mike C. wrote:

    @ MacDuff:

    That was a nice thought for a Fat Tuesday. Not my thing, mind you, but a nice thought anyway.

    Cool, thanks for your kind sentiment.


  34. Mars
    34 | February 12, 2013 9:07 am

    http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/340236/gop-leaders-wield-unlikely-weapon-against-obama-bob-woodward-eliana-johnson

    Republicans finally hitting back at O using his own tactics.


  35. Guggi
    35 | February 12, 2013 9:10 am

    Mars wrote:

    Unfortunately then sociology violates the key principle of education and proceeds to tell you how they feel the changes should happen.

    Examples, please ?


  36. huckfunn
    36 | February 12, 2013 9:12 am

    Guggi wrote:

    There is a great danger in every Western (style) country with democratic principles: people don’t like responsibilites but like to transfer power to the state. Democratic principles are not sexy but boring and exhausting. In sociology you learn (yes, I know it’s “sociology” OmG ) rules have always be chnaged by (middle class) people who were bored by the existing rules and norms.

    I would compare Americans fleeing North to South with people fleeing eastern Europe for the West at every opporunity. Oppressive laws and regulations. Crumbling infrastructure. The cities of the South are comparatively newer than those of the North and Northeast. People remember why they left the old for the new.


  37. 37 | February 12, 2013 9:12 am

    Guggi wrote:

    There is a great danger in every Western (style) country with democratic principles: people don’t like responsibilites but like to transfer power to the state. Democratic principles are not sexy but boring and exhausting. In sociology you learn (yes, I know it’s “sociology” OmG ) rules have always be chnaged by (middle class) people who were bored by the existing rules and norms.

    Indeed. Prosperity breeds sloth as well as the deconstruction and eventual destruction of those things that brought about prosperity in the first place. We are complex creatures who seem to handle failure and defeat far better than success.


  38. huckfunn
    38 | February 12, 2013 9:13 am

    Eye doctor appointment. Gotta go.


  39. Mars
    39 | February 12, 2013 9:15 am

    Guggi wrote:

    Mars wrote:
    Unfortunately then sociology violates the key principle of education and proceeds to tell you how they feel the changes should happen.
    Examples, please ?

    In the class I took every solution to every problem was socialism. The only way to help a people progress, equality of outcome. The only good “primitive” people, the ones who utilized “community property”. Discussing how sexualizing children is actually good for the community. Detailing how great the “third sex” principle is a vital glue to hold society together.

    And it went on and on and on. When the class spends over a week expounding the glories and virtues of Margaret Sanger without once mentioning her Eugenicist and racist views, you know you have a problem.


  40. Mars
    40 | February 12, 2013 9:17 am

    Of course as someone with a love of both physical and cultural anthropology, my antagonistic attitude toward sociology comes honestly.


  41. 41 | February 12, 2013 9:18 am

    @ Guggi:

    The entitlement stuff is just one aspect, but its not the main culprit. It’s the attitude many Republicans are perceived to have. Many like Santorum come across arrogant and hostile to many Americans. Why vote for a party that is perceived to hate you? I am not saying that this is true, but the fact is many Republicans come across like their shit don’t stink.

    Some Republicans like Bobby Jindal, Marco Rubio and Rand Paul do get and are trying to change the perception by not coming off as arrogant and hostile. But many in the party do not get it yet. Until they do, Democrats will continue to win elections by pretending to be everyone’s friend.


  42. 42 | February 12, 2013 9:19 am

    @ Mars:

    Even out here sociology might as well be called socialism 101.

    Aint that the truth. Sociology=Socialism.


  43. Moe Katz
    43 | February 12, 2013 9:20 am

    @ Mars:
    I like both disciplines, for me each of them has its insights.


  44. Mars
    44 | February 12, 2013 9:21 am

    http://www.economist.com/blogs/democracyinamerica/2011/02/picturing_politics

    Interesting chart. A bit simplistic though.


  45. Speranza
    45 | February 12, 2013 9:21 am

    Iron Fist wrote:

    Gallup Poll: a majority of Americans disapprove of Obama’s gun control policies.
    For those who don’t want to click through, it is 54-42 in our favor. Obama won’t listen, but I hope the GOP is. opposing Obama on gun control is the right thing to do, and it is also the politically favorable thing to do. I have no intention of watching the State of the Union speech tonight. I didn’t typically watch them during the Bush years. Why would I subject myself to Obama? We know basically what he is going to say.

    He would still get re-elected so does it really matter?


  46. Speranza
    46 | February 12, 2013 9:22 am

    huckfunn wrote:

    @ coldwarrior:
    Rick Perry California Tour: Governor Heads To San Francisco To Lure Business Owners To Texas. Be sure and watch the vid.

    As long as they leave their liberal politics in the Golden State when they migrate to the Lone Star State.


  47. Speranza
    47 | February 12, 2013 9:23 am

    Rodan wrote:

    @ Mars:
    Even out here sociology might as well be called socialism 101.
    Aint that the truth. Sociology=Socialism.

    Unfortunately you can say the same thing about most liberal arts.


  48. Guggi
    48 | February 12, 2013 9:23 am

    huckfunn wrote:

    I would compare Americans fleeing North to South with people fleeing eastern Europe for the West at every opporunity. Oppressive laws and regulations. Crumbling infrastructure. The cities of the South are comparatively newer than those of the North and Northeast. People remember why they left the old for the new.

    People fleeing from East to West adapt within one generation (or less) to Western (entitlement) politics. Germans in Eastern Germany vote in great numbers for former communist now called “Die Linke” (=”The Lefties”).


  49. Mars
    49 | February 12, 2013 9:26 am

    Speranza wrote:

    Rodan wrote:
    @ Mars:
    Even out here sociology might as well be called socialism 101.
    Aint that the truth. Sociology=Socialism.

    Unfortunately you can say the same thing about most liberal arts.

    I got lucky in Psych. Only two of my professors were flaming libs.


  50. Speranza
    50 | February 12, 2013 9:26 am

    coldwarrior wrote:

    huckfunn wrote:
    @ coldwarrior:
    Rick Perry California Tour: Governor Heads To San Francisco To Lure Business Owners To Texas. Be sure and watch the vid.

    i love that. go into the home of the beast and rip its heart out!

    Outside of banks, coffee houses, Chinese restaurants and head shops -- what businesses are left in San Francisco?


  51. Speranza
    51 | February 12, 2013 9:27 am

    Mars wrote:

    I got lucky in Psych. Only two of my professors were flaming libs

    You did luck out.


  52. Moe Katz
    52 | February 12, 2013 9:28 am

    Structural-functionalism is a major approach in sociology that is inherently very conservative.


  53. Guggi
    53 | February 12, 2013 9:30 am

    Mars wrote:

    In the class I took every solution to every problem was socialism.

    I guess this is a misunderstanding. Revolts or Revolutions etc. are NOT the work of the masses but the work of a bored middle class. Even the Farmers Wars during the Dark Ages were started by middle class citizens and theologicans and NOT by the farmers themselves.

    This is only a statement not an instruction.


  54. 54 | February 12, 2013 9:31 am

    @ Moe Katz:

    hey would you like to do a guest post on that subject?


  55. 55 | February 12, 2013 9:32 am

    @ Guggi:

    Most Communist revolutionaries are upper class. people. The base of the Democrats are very wealthy Hipsters.


  56. 56 | February 12, 2013 9:33 am

    @ Moe Katz:

    OK Moe, who’s in your avatar eh.


  57. 57 | February 12, 2013 9:33 am

    @ Speranza:

    Silicon Valley related industries, that get huge tax breaks but support the Democrats. I will never understand why Republicans support Tax Breaks for companies that hate them.


  58. Moe Katz
    58 | February 12, 2013 9:34 am

    @ Rodan:
    Lemme think about it. There are certainly schools of thought in sociology that fit a conservative worldview. Even Weberian sociology would be centrist or mildly liberal at most….


  59. Moe Katz
    59 | February 12, 2013 9:35 am

    Macker wrote:

    @ Moe Katz:
    OK Moe, who’s in your avatar eh.

    Those are Pole dancers. Thanks for giving me the straight line. :)


  60. 60 | February 12, 2013 9:35 am

    @ Moe Katz:

    OK, I do think its a very interesting subject.


  61. 61 | February 12, 2013 9:36 am

    Why a Johns Hopkins Neurosurgeon Is Getting 2016 Presidential Buzz

    If conservatives are looking for a political outsider with an inspiring rags-to-riches story and who could effectively challenge President Obama’s policies on health care and taxes while also quoting Scripture and criticizing political correctness, look no further than Ben Carson.

    Carson, raised by a single mother in a poverty-stricken home, who went on to become a top Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon, gave a nearly 30-minute speech at the National Prayer Breakfast last week that indirectly criticized many of the policies promulgated by President Obama — all while the president sat just to his side.


  62. 62 | February 12, 2013 9:38 am

    @ Rodan:

    Yep, Обама will destroy this guy too, just like he did with Herman Cain ’cause he’s an Uncle Tom….


  63. Moe Katz
    63 | February 12, 2013 9:41 am

    @ Rodan:
    You do run into mostly lefties in sociology departments in North America and Europe nowadays, that’s a valid observation, but not because there aren’t more conservative ideas available in the discipline. It’s just a question of fashion.


  64. coldwarrior
    64 | February 12, 2013 9:42 am

    Rodan wrote:

    Why a Johns Hopkins Neurosurgeon Is Getting 2016 Presidential Buzz

    because neurology is superior to all other disciplines in medicine.

    :lol:


  65. coldwarrior
    65 | February 12, 2013 9:43 am

    Rodan wrote:

    Why a Johns Hopkins Neurosurgeon Is Getting 2016 Presidential Buzz
    If conservatives are looking for a political outsider with an inspiring rags-to-riches story and who could effectively challenge President Obama’s policies on health care and taxes while also quoting Scripture and criticizing political correctness, look no further than Ben Carson.
    Carson, raised by a single mother in a poverty-stricken home, who went on to become a top Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon, gave a nearly 30-minute speech at the National Prayer Breakfast last week that indirectly criticized many of the policies promulgated by President Obama — all while the president sat just to his side.

    and the left is calling his speech inappropriate and are angry that he dissed the prez.


  66. Moe Katz
    66 | February 12, 2013 9:44 am

    @ coldwarrior:
    Proctology has its place, I’d argue.


  67. Guggi
    67 | February 12, 2013 9:44 am

    Moe Katz wrote:

    @ Rodan:
    You do run into mostly lefties in sociology departments in North America and Europe nowadays, that’s a valid observation, but not because there aren’t more conservative ideas available in the discipline. It’s just a question of fashion.

    Not at my university. About two thirds are more conservative or independent and about one third is lefty. The lefty are relentless beaten in discussion by th others :-)


  68. Guggi
    68 | February 12, 2013 9:45 am

    Guggi wrote:

    lefty

    lefties


  69. 69 | February 12, 2013 9:45 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    Coincidentally, 50 years ago, those facts were reversed. What were the economic conditions of those two states then. The three California Governors who preceded Moon Beam Brown were I believe, Nixon, Wilson, and Reagan. Texas was perennially a product of the Johnson Machine. California’s economy was booming and Texas at one time was struggling. As the Democrats left Texas for California looking for jobs, the roles reversed. So have the fortunes.


  70. Moe Katz
    70 | February 12, 2013 9:46 am

    @ Guggi:
    That’s good.


  71. buzzsawmonkey
    71 | February 12, 2013 9:47 am

    Maybe Texas can start annexing neighboring states. Possibly it can begin by constructing settlements…


  72. 72 | February 12, 2013 9:48 am

    @ coldwarrior:

    See my #41.


  73. 73 | February 12, 2013 9:48 am

    @ Speranza:

    He isn’t running for re-election. The Democrats in the Senate are, and they don’t have the Magic Fairy Dust® that Obama has. You’d better believe they care. That’s why Joe Manchin has already came out against renewing the “Assault Weapons” ban.


  74. buzzsawmonkey
    74 | February 12, 2013 9:49 am

    MacDuff wrote:

    happy Fat Tuesday to all!

    Obama will turn Fat Tuesday into Fathead Tuesday by wrapping it up with the State of the Union Address.

    Forget “Groundhog Day” and six more weeks of winter; he will usher in four years of Lent.


  75. 75 | February 12, 2013 9:51 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    They are dropping the issue. Its the only issue left the Republicans can do them damage on. Why help you opponent who is in trouble?

    they don’t have the Magic Fairy Dust® that Obama has.

    They have OFA and Obama has made it clear, he is going to campaign to keep the Senate and win back the House. Do not underestimate him nor OFA.


  76. 76 | February 12, 2013 9:55 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    Обама with Magic Fairy Dust®…how apropos!


  77. Guggi
    77 | February 12, 2013 9:57 am

    The WaPo is already preventing damage from O. argueing that the State of the Union Speeches never had much impact.


  78. 78 | February 12, 2013 9:58 am

    @ MacDuff:

    Laissez-les bon temps roules mes amis!


  79. 79 | February 12, 2013 10:00 am

    @ Macker:

    I figured you’d like that one! :P


  80. RIX
    80 | February 12, 2013 10:01 am

    By Spencer E. Ante, The Wall Street Journal

    The U.S. government spent about $2.2 billion last year to provide phones to low-income Americans, but a Wall Street Journal review of the program shows that a large number of those who received the phones haven’t proved they are eligible to receive them.

    Read more: http://nation.foxnews.com/obama-phones/2013/02/12/obama-phone-scandal#ixzz2KhHNxkHo

    how many of these phones are being used for street drug deals
    in places like Chicago?
    We know that some people got multiple phones.


  81. 81 | February 12, 2013 10:02 am

    @ Carolina Girl:

    Does that mean let the good times role in French? If you ask me how I am guessing, its because French and Spanish are close and I can make out some of the words.


  82. 82 | February 12, 2013 10:02 am

    Guggi wrote:

    The WaPo is already preventing damage from O. argueing that the State of the Union Speeches never had much impact.

    They are part of the Regime.


  83. coldwarrior
    83 | February 12, 2013 10:03 am

    Moe Katz wrote:

    @ coldwarrior:
    Proctology has its place, I’d argue.

    you can keep the gi and endocrine stuff. thanks


  84. 84 | February 12, 2013 10:03 am

    Special Charles Johnson thread at 2 PM! This one really is out there even for him.


  85. 85 | February 12, 2013 10:03 am

    @ Rodan:

    Oui!


  86. Speranza
    86 | February 12, 2013 10:06 am

    Rodan wrote:

    @ Speranza:
    Silicon Valley related industries, that get huge tax breaks but support the Democrats. I will never understand why Republicans support Tax Breaks for companies that hate them.

    Me neither. Makes no sense at all.


  87. RIX
    87 | February 12, 2013 10:07 am

    Rodan wrote:

    Guggi wrote:

    The WaPo is already preventing damage from O. argueing that the State of the Union Speeches never had much impact.

    They are part of the Regime.

    He is going to call for more “investments” meaning
    more tax & spending.


  88. coldwarrior
    88 | February 12, 2013 10:08 am

    Speranza wrote:

    Rodan wrote:
    @ Speranza:
    Silicon Valley related industries, that get huge tax breaks but support the Democrats. I will never understand why Republicans support Tax Breaks for companies that hate them.

    Me neither. Makes no sense at all.

    because these corporations are owned by shareholders who profit when less taxes are levied.


  89. 89 | February 12, 2013 10:08 am

    @ Speranza:

    Jindal told them to stop being stupid.
    See my #41.


  90. 90 | February 12, 2013 10:09 am

    @ coldwarrior:

    But these same companies support the Democrats. Why do them favors, when they hate you? I get the economic rational, but if an entity is spending its money to defeat you, why help them?


  91. coldwarrior
    91 | February 12, 2013 10:12 am

    Rodan wrote:

    @ coldwarrior:
    But these same companies support the Democrats. Why do them favors, when they hate you? I get the economic rational, but if an entity is spending its money to defeat you, why help them?

    i dont care. the only function of a corporation is to make money for its shareholders, period. anything else is extracurricular.

    people inside the corp might support dems, ‘the corporation’ as a legal and economic structure does not because it cannot. it can only make money for its shareholders as its only moral duty.


  92. coldwarrior
    92 | February 12, 2013 10:15 am

    Rodan wrote:

    @ Speranza:
    Jindal told them to stop being stupid.
    See my #41.

    good luck with that. the gop has been afflicted with stupid since 92


  93. 93 | February 12, 2013 10:16 am

    @ Rodan:

    Republicans don’t view the State as a vehicle for “punishing your enemies”. They view lower corporate taxes as an objective good from all of the good things that it produces.


  94. 94 | February 12, 2013 10:17 am

    @ coldwarrior:

    Bobby Jindal, Marco Rubio and Rand Paul are trying, but many on our side despise those 3. I wish them luck.


  95. buzzsawmonkey
    95 | February 12, 2013 10:18 am

    Rodan wrote:

    They have OFA and Obama has made it clear, he is going to campaign to keep the Senate and win back the House. Do not underestimate him nor OFA.

    Hey, the Republicans have Karl Rove, the Attack Shoat!


  96. coldwarrior
    96 | February 12, 2013 10:18 am

    i’m going to guess he is in heart failure

    VATICAN CITY — The Vatican is acknowledging for the first time that Pope Benedict XVI has had a pacemaker for years and that its battery was replaced a few months ago in secret.

    Vatican spokesman Rev. Federico Lombardi said Benedict had the pacemaker installed “a long time” before he became pope in 2005. He called the latest medical procedure “routine.”

    It was the first time the Vatican has mentioned a papal pacemaker.

    Italian daily Il Sole 24 said the pope had the pacemaker procedure less than three months ago in a Rome hospital and did not miss any public appearances.


  97. coldwarrior
    97 | February 12, 2013 10:19 am

    Rodan wrote:

    @ coldwarrior:
    Bobby Jindal, Marco Rubio and Rand Paul are trying, but many on our side despise those 3. I wish them luck.

    long is the struggle, hard the fight.


  98. 98 | February 12, 2013 10:19 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    Maybe its time to change that view.

    BTW, I have a hysterical CJ thread for 2. Check it out in preview, you state gets an honorable mention! :lol:


  99. Moe Katz
    99 | February 12, 2013 10:21 am

    coldwarrior wrote:

    you can keep the gi and endocrine stuff. thanks

    You might find it more cheerful. Business is always looking up.


  100. 100 | February 12, 2013 10:23 am

    coldwarrior wrote:

    Rodan wrote:
    @ coldwarrior:
    But these same companies support the Democrats. Why do them favors, when they hate you? I get the economic rational, but if an entity is spending its money to defeat you, why help them?
    i dont care. the only function of a corporation is to make money for its shareholders, period. anything else is extracurricular.
    people inside the corp might support dems, ‘the corporation’ as a legal and economic structure does not because it cannot. it can only make money for its shareholders as its only moral duty.

    Large corporations have a tendency to support increased regulation/taxation of their own industries based on the fact that such tends to crush start-up challengers and competition. They know they can survive it, but those annoying new guys can’t. And by backing such seemingly against-their-own-interests measures, they know they can get political breaks down the road. It’s actually pretty simple.


  101. coldwarrior
    101 | February 12, 2013 10:24 am

    Moe Katz wrote:

    coldwarrior wrote:
    you can keep the gi and endocrine stuff. thanks
    You might find it more cheerful. Business is always looking up.

    :lol:


  102. 102 | February 12, 2013 10:24 am

    @ coldwarrior:

    he did the right thing.


  103. 103 | February 12, 2013 10:25 am

    @ Mike C.:

    You nailed it!


  104. coldwarrior
    104 | February 12, 2013 10:26 am

    Mike C. wrote:

    Large corporations have a tendency to support increased regulation/taxation of their own industries based on the fact that such tends to crush start-up challengers and competition. They know they can survive it, but those annoying new guys can’t. And by backing such seemingly against-their-own-interests measures, they know they can get political breaks down the road. It’s actually pretty simple.

    the only function of a corporation is to make money for its shareholders, period. anything else is extracurricular.

    crushing the competition in this manner, while not quite cricket, is still legal and makes money for shareholders.


  105. 105 | February 12, 2013 10:31 am

    @ Rodan:

    Well, is should have been “roulez” not “roules” but yep -- the motto of the day down in the Crescent City today. The Zulu Parade should be getting underway in a few hours!


  106. 106 | February 12, 2013 10:31 am

    @ coldwarrior:

    Oh, I agree with that, although we can see recent examples of that being ignored (GM? Solyndra?) But yes, the ethical purpose of a corporation is to profit shareholders, period.


  107. coldwarrior
    107 | February 12, 2013 10:33 am

    bbl, i gotta get plastered.


  108. 108 | February 12, 2013 10:35 am

    @ coldwarrior:

    Hey -- come back! I have a big bottle of Hurricanes at my desk! Made with Baccardi 151!


  109. 109 | February 12, 2013 10:36 am

    @ Rodan:

    Must be good if we’re moving the dickless wonder over to this blog! That’s 11:00 a.m. my time, right? I’ll try to get completely caught up on my work. Don’t wanna miss that one.


  110. coldwarrior
    110 | February 12, 2013 10:37 am

    Carolina Girl wrote:

    @ coldwarrior:
    Hey — come back! I have a big bottle of Hurricanes at my desk! Made with Baccardi 151!

    :lol:

    hurricanes! love em!

    (i am using plaster for some wall work… :lol: )


  111. 111 | February 12, 2013 10:38 am

    Carolina Girl wrote:

    @ coldwarrior:

    Hey — come back! I have a big bottle of Hurricanes at my desk! Made with Baccardi 151!

    I like your style!


  112. 112 | February 12, 2013 10:51 am

    @ Carolina Girl:

    Yup, its a follow up to a post I did 3 years ago.


  113. 114 | February 12, 2013 11:02 am

    @ Rodan:

    Notice that his favorite target was named American Patriot of the Year. Meanwhile, Chuckles languishes with his less than 6K followers. You’d think someone that important would have more. Hell, the people he attacks have followers in the high five figures.


  114. 115 | February 12, 2013 11:04 am

    @ lobo91:

    Layers of editors and fact checkers… :roll:


  115. Speranza
    117 | February 12, 2013 11:04 am

    @ Carolina Girl:
    I saw epsiode 1 of Ripper Street last night. Will watch episode 2 tonight or tomorrow night. I will not watch a minute of the SOTU address.


  116. 118 | February 12, 2013 11:07 am

    @ Carolina Girl:

    Check his Dan Rather thread from last week. The Leftists gave him hell.


  117. lobo91
    119 | February 12, 2013 11:07 am

    Iron Fist wrote:

    @ lobo91:
    Layers of editors and fact checkers…

    Yup…that’s why the MSM is so much more important than those silly bloggers writing in their pajamas…
    //


  118. 120 | February 12, 2013 11:15 am

    @ lobo91:

    I hear he’s also penning a strongly worded letter!

    @ Rodan:

    Well, then, Cheetos boy should be grateful that I and the BRC outed him as a fraud!


  119. 121 | February 12, 2013 11:16 am

    @ Speranza:

    I rather love it -- it’s sort of CSI: Whitechapel I did a bit of a marathon over the weekend since there was no football on Sunday -- watched all four episodes in order. We’ll have to talk Sunday about it.


  120. Speranza
    122 | February 12, 2013 12:14 pm

    Carolina Girl wrote:

    @ Speranza:
    I rather love it — it’s sort of CSI: Whitechappel I did a bit of a marathon over the weekend since there was no football on Sunday — watched all four episodes in order. We’ll have to talk Sunday about it.

    I am enjoying it.


  121. Buffalobob
    123 | February 12, 2013 12:20 pm

    I’d caution Texas with the old phrase, be careful what you wish for. Austin has been flooded with NYers. Recruiting Californians comes with political risk. Unfortunately when liberals flee a high tax state they take their prog mindset with them and repeat their social voting mistakes.


  122. Speranza
    124 | February 12, 2013 12:24 pm

    Buffalobob wrote:

    Unfortunately when liberals flee a high tax state they take their prog mindset with them and repeat their social voting mistakes.

    See New Hampshire.


  123. mtc
    125 | February 12, 2013 1:08 pm

    @ coldwarrior:
    He had a mild stroke in 1991 which caused him to fall and hit his head but he recovered quickly. He may have had the pacemaker installed then.


  124. mtc
    126 | February 12, 2013 1:10 pm

    @ Carolina Girl:
    It’s raining here in Mobile today and yesterday so there haven’t been too many parades


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