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SNL pulls ‘Anti-Semitic’ parody on Chuck Hagel Senate confirmation hearing

by Speranza ( 8 Comments › )
Filed under Headlines, Media at February 18th, 2013 - 7:52 am

The skit was unbelievably stupid and misleading without one element of truth to it. It’s portrayal of Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina was straight out of “Amos and Andy”.  I saw the televised hearings and what was almost comical was Hagel’s ineptitude.

by  Gil Ronen

NBC‘s flagship satirical television show, Saturday Night Live, cancelled the airing of a controversial skit lampooning the confirmation hearing of Secretary of Defense nominee Chuck Hagel, but uploaded the skit to the internet.

The skit prompted criticism from the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) and from Israel advocate Mark Langfan, among others.

Foxman told The Daily Beast the sketch was “overdone and overdone and overdone. It focuses on the issue of Israel to such a ridiculous extreme that we do become concerned because there is a claim out there that America’s a tool of the Israelis.”

It makes no difference, he said, that SNL executive producer Lorne Michaels and many of the show’s writers and staffers are Jewish. “That doesn’t excuse their insensitivity and their playing on stereotypes and selling stereotypes and [en]forcing stereotypes,” he said.

[.......]

In the six-minute sketch, Hagel is grilled by senators Lindsey Graham, Tim Scott, John McCain and Bernie Sanders, who compete with each other to show their slavish devotion to Israel. The John McCain character demands to know if Hagel would perform a sexual act with an animal if Binyamin Netanyahu told him to, and refuses to confirm him as Secretary of Defense when he answers in the negative.

Pro-Israel advocate Mark Langfan went further than Foxman, stating unequivocally that the sketch was anti-Semitic, because it “makes the U.S. senators look like Israeli senators who are prisoners of the ‘Jewish lobby.’”

In addition, he said, it is racist, because it “makes the black U.S. Republican senator look like he just got off a farm and portrays him as a total rube. For SNL it’s kosher to excoriate a black Republican senator only because he’s Republican.”

Asked by Arutz Sheva if mocking the power of the pro-Israel lobby is not legitimate satire, Langfan explained:

“Not when the satire actually perverts the true fact that Hagel looked like the idiot with his answers on ‘containment’ that had to corrected by his handlers with a corrective note. If they attacked a black Democratic congressman like they attacked a black Republican senator, there would be outrage. The black senator was only attacked because he was a Republican. That’s disgustingly racist.

The airing of the skit on television was cancelled, Langfan said, “because they might have realized how putrid and lurid the skit was.”

Read he rest - SNL pulls Anti-Semitic’ parody on Hagel hearing

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8 Responses to “SNL pulls ‘Anti-Semitic’ parody on Chuck Hagel Senate confirmation hearing”
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  1. Speranza
    1 | February 18, 2013 7:53 am

    I saw it, it was as funny as the prep work for a colonoscopy.


  2. 2 | February 18, 2013 8:08 am

    As far as I’m concerned, SNL and its entire team of actors, writers, etc. are members of the Film Actors’ Guild.


  3. 3 | February 18, 2013 9:02 am

    The show hasn’t been funny in years. Sad what passes for humor in the woozy dreamlike skull jelly that is the liberal mind these days. They have to play that laugh track on such a high volume now during their show that I am starting to be able to identify some of the individual voices recorded for that bit of buffoonery.


  4. Speranza
    4 | February 18, 2013 9:16 am

    Flyovercountry wrote:

    The show hasn’t been funny in years. Sad what passes for humor in the woozy dreamlike skull jelly that is the liberal mind these days. They have to play that laugh track on such a high volume now during their show that I am starting to be able to identify some of the individual voices recorded for that bit of buffoonery.

    It occasionally can be funny (like its skit of the increasingly ridiculous Showtime series “Homeland”) but more often then not it is only mildly amusing.
    http://www.hulu.com/watch/423747


  5. buzzsawmonkey
    7 | February 18, 2013 11:14 am

    Flyovercountry wrote:

    The show hasn’t been funny in years.

    I’d have to suggest that SNL’s alleged humor during its so-called glory days was primarily a function of people fondly remembering their youth, often through a nostalgic haze of controlled substances, the youthful frisson of “Gee! Did they really say that?”, and sadness over the untimely deaths of John Belushi and others.

    I watched SNL enough back in the day to have sat through a number of cringingly bad sketches, many of them ill-timed and grindingly overlong. Any show that has run as long as SNL has will naturally come up with some iconic moments, but that doesn’t mean the show was ever really “good.” To be fair, the Python troupe also had a huge share of dull, unfunny, and repetitive sketches, which we tend to forget when remembering their glory moments.


  6. Speranza
    8 | February 18, 2013 3:56 pm

    buzzsawmonkey wrote:

    I’d have to suggest that SNL’s alleged humor during its so-called glory days was primarily a function of people fondly remembering their youth, often through a nostalgic haze of controlled substances, the youthful frisson of “Gee! Did they really say that?”, and sadness over the untimely deaths of John Belushi and others.

    Gilda Radner and her “Roseanne Rosannadanna” character was hilarious. I always thought that John Belushi was overrated.


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