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Friday Night – Party In The Kybo

by Bunk X ( 66 Comments › )
Filed under Beer of the Week, Food and Drink, Humor, OOT at April 26th, 2013 - 10:06 pm

corona-girl_feelsru

Not sure what that’s all about, but the image was lifted it from a now-defunct Russian website, Feels.ru. Lot of unusual pics (and viruses) that often triggered spam beacons.

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66 Responses to “Friday Night – Party In The Kybo”
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  1. coldwarrior
    1 | April 26, 2013 10:11 pm

    not gonna say how i know this guy…check him out


  2. RIX
    2 | April 26, 2013 10:12 pm

    Hmmm, looks like an open thread.
    I had a dream last night that revealed
    the secret of life to me.
    I want to share it with all of you, but
    damn, I forgot.


  3. coldwarrior
    3 | April 26, 2013 10:16 pm

    RIX wrote:

    Hmmm, looks like an open thread.
    I had a dream last night that revealed
    the secret of life to me.
    I want to share it with all of you, but
    damn, I forgot.

    typical.

    :lol:


  4. heysoos
    4 | April 26, 2013 10:17 pm

    @ coldwarrior:
    knot


  5. coldwarrior
    5 | April 26, 2013 10:17 pm


  6. Bordm
    6 | April 26, 2013 10:17 pm

    RIX wrote:

    Hmmm, looks like an open thread.
    I had a dream last night that revealed
    the secret of life to me.
    I want to share it with all of you, but
    damn, I forgot.

    Beer!


  7. RIX
    7 | April 26, 2013 10:21 pm

    Bordm wrote:

    RIX wrote:

    Hmmm, looks like an open thread.
    I had a dream last night that revealed
    the secret of life to me.
    I want to share it with all of you, but
    damn, I forgot.

    Beer!

    Yeah, you jogged my memory, It’s beer! But there is
    something else too,


  8. coldwarrior
    8 | April 26, 2013 10:28 pm

    RIX wrote:

    Yeah, you jogged my memory, It’s beer! But there is
    something else too,

    pretzels.

    beer and pretzels, unless you are in johnstown pa, then its beer and pickled eggs


  9. coldwarrior
    9 | April 26, 2013 10:30 pm


  10. heysoos
    10 | April 26, 2013 10:30 pm

    relax…
    soothing


  11. coldwarrior
    11 | April 26, 2013 10:33 pm

    @ heysoos:

    :lol:

    they do a fine version of that old standard.


  12. RIX
    12 | April 26, 2013 10:33 pm

    coldwarrior wrote:

    RIX wrote:

    Yeah, you jogged my memory, It’s beer! But there is
    something else too,

    pretzels.

    beer and pretzels, unless you are in johnstown pa, then its beer and pickled eggs

    No, now I remember, it’s pizza.
    The secret to life is beer & pizza!


  13. heysoos
    13 | April 26, 2013 10:36 pm

    coldwarrior wrote:

    @ heysoos:

    they do a fine version of that old standard.

    just some smash mouth r/r…once in a rare moment


  14. lobo91
    14 | April 26, 2013 10:44 pm

    I have no beer.

    I don’t think they’ve discovered it yet here.

    I barely have internet or cell phone connectivity.


  15. AZfederalist
    15 | April 26, 2013 10:46 pm

    lobo91 wrote:

    I have no beer.

    I don’t think they’ve discovered it yet here.

    I barely have internet or cell phone connectivity.

    But what I’ve been seeing ya’ll have pot. Lots and lots of pot


  16. Bordm
    16 | April 26, 2013 11:02 pm

    Gun confiscation starting in California?


  17. 17 | April 26, 2013 11:15 pm

    @ RIX:

    The meaning of life is 42.


  18. Bumr50
    18 | April 26, 2013 11:26 pm

    coldwarrior wrote:

    unless you are in johnstown pa, then its beer and pickled eggs

    If you’re in Cumberland, MD, it’s beer, pickled eggs, and shufflepuck.


  19. lobo91
    19 | April 26, 2013 11:27 pm

    @ AZfederalist:

    But what I’ve been seeing ya’ll have pot. Lots and lots of pot

    I’m sitting in a motel room in Raton, NM at the moment, not at home in Colorado.


  20. Bumr50
    20 | April 26, 2013 11:29 pm

    @ lobo91:

    Where the hell are you?


  21. lobo91
    21 | April 26, 2013 11:31 pm

    It was only supposed to be for tonight, but I got the opportunity to take another course while I’m here. I’ll leave Sunday with both my rifle and shotgun instructor ratings.


  22. AZfederalist
    22 | April 26, 2013 11:33 pm

    lobo91 wrote:

    @ AZfederalist:

    But what I’ve been seeing ya’ll have pot. Lots and lots of pot

    I’m sitting in a motel room in Raton, NM at the moment, not at home in Colorado.

    Ah, yeah, not much in Raton. … and what there is, is expensive. At least that’s been our experience driving through there. We always wait it Trinidad to get gasoline.


  23. AZfederalist
    23 | April 26, 2013 11:35 pm

    @ AZfederalist:

    Dang autocorrect. Should be

    We always wait until Trinidad to get gasoline


  24. AZfederalist
    24 | April 26, 2013 11:41 pm

    @ lobo91:

    NRA sponsored courses?

    Sounds like a good deal for you; best of luck.


  25. lobo91
    25 | April 26, 2013 11:49 pm

    AZfederalist wrote:

    @ lobo91:
    NRA sponsored courses?
    Sounds like a good deal for you; best of luck.

    Yeah, I’ve wanted to pick up the rifle rating for awhile, but nobody’s had the instructor course nearby at a good time. I’m taking it at the Whitington Center south of Raton. As it turns out, they’re having a shotgun instructor course starting right after this one finishes, so I’m staying around and taking it, too.

    That will give me all the basic discipline ratings.


  26. Bumr50
    26 | April 27, 2013 12:01 am

    @ lobo91:

    Are they difficult?


  27. Bumr50
    27 | April 27, 2013 12:07 am


  28. Bumr50
    28 | April 27, 2013 12:10 am

    A Pittsburgh administrative judge has ruled that University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s email policy that barred the use of computer systems for union-organizing activities violated federal labor law, according to a Pittsburgh Tribune-Review report.

    Judge David Goldman ordered UPMC to end the policy, which prohibited employees from using email and social media websites to correspond about unionization efforts at Oakland and Shadyside hospitals. A UPMC spokesperson said the system is reviewing the judge’s ruling.

    In its December 2012 complaint against UPMC, the National Labor Relations Board claimed the system engaged in several unfair labor practices. Although UPMC settled those allegations in February, it sought to have its email and computer policy network upheld. The NLRB complaint stemmed from charges filed by SEIU Healthcare Pennsylvania.

    UPMC now faces more charges from SEIU. This month, the union claimed the system has not followed terms of its NLRB settlement and is persisting with its unfair labor practices.

    ht- Becker’s Hospital Review


  29. Aussie Infidel
    29 | April 27, 2013 12:13 am

    Welcome to Oz, where no one rules
    With no aristocracy or ruling class, Australia is a nation of lucky bastards who make their own luck, says Nick Cater in his new book.
    Nick Cater

    http://www.spiked-online.com/site/article/13555/

    If there were an effective method of screening new arrivals for traces of social pretension, or an insecticide that could be used on aircraft to kill airs and graces, Australia’s assiduous quarantine service would have discovered it by now. The levelling instinct is woven thickly through the social fabric and Australians are forever on their guard against snobbery.

    There is no place for deference in the Australian book of etiquette; the inheritance of wealth is tolerated but no one inherits privilege, and respect is not for sale at any price.

    Egalitarianism is the nation’s primary operating principle, the key to its success and its saving grace. There is no other country where egalitarianism is held in such high regard, nor where any hint of an aristocracy has been so firmly slapped down.

    For people like me who grew up in Britain, ever mindful of one’s place in the social pecking order, something particularly refreshing hangs in the egalitarian breeze as soon as you step off the plane. Customs and immigration officers command respect, not because they are wearing uniforms, but because they are earning an honest living, just like the taxi driver you sit next to, not behind.

    There is no recourse to status, and therein lies the promise, repeated so often that it ought to be a cliché: in Australia ‘everybody gets a fair go’. There are no institutional barriers to success; the only restraints are personal deficits of imagination, energy and courage.

    Australians instinctively understand the American metaphor of log cabin to White House; its egalitarian promise, abounding optimism and democratic embrace are common to both nations. In the Australian version, however, the pauper-to-president narrative is turned on its head: ‘Rooster one day, feather duster the next.’

    Told this way, it is less a story of inspiration than one of caution; it is not an ode to Redemption, but a parable of the Fall. Yet it is no less powerful a statement of the egalitarian promise: every citizen has the power to change their life for better or for worse.

    Egalitarianism is frequently, and sometimes deliberately, misapplied as a synonym for equality. Dollar-shop Marxists, who reduce the narrative of the nineteenth-century class struggle to an argument about postcodes, seize upon disparities in wealth and income as proof that Australia is not, and perhaps never was, truly egalitarian.

    Democratic egalitarianism, however, is equality in manners, rather than equality of wealth. Paradoxically, egalitarianism is a force for financial inequality, since it offers an incentive to rise above the crowd, to achieve whatever your imagination desires. It is the motive force of personal and national progress, mining the inner resource Americans call ‘grit’, the British call ‘courage’ and Australians call ‘mongrel’. The obstacles to success are personal, not social; individual failings rather than institutional prejudice are mostly what holds its people back. As Alexis de Tocqueville discovered in America, ‘the chief cause of disparity between the fortunes of men is the mind’.

    In Australia, aspiration is democratised; everyone has the chance to make something of themselves and to improve the lot of their family. It has become fashionable to regard aspiration as a vice, akin to greed and avarice. Consumerism has been redefined as a negative force in society, instead of simply an expression of the free market that drives a virtuous circle of economic growth for all.

    Yet as Adam Smith noted, private and public ambition come as a package: ‘The natural effort of every individual to better his own condition, when suffered to exert itself with freedom and security, is so powerful a principle, that it is alone, and without any assistance, not only capable of carrying on the society to wealth and prosperity, but of surmounting a hundred impertinent obstructions.’

    Australia’s collective postwar growth was driven by personal ambition not government central planning. In his famous 1942 speech, ‘The Forgotten People’, Australia’s future prime minister, Robert Menzies, looked to the ambitious middle-class home owner as ‘the motive power’ of progress.

    The promise that the humblest migrant could through enterprise and energy earn enough to buy property and land was at the heart of the Australian dream from the beginning. Higher wages by themselves would not have persuaded an Essex ploughman to move his family to the Antipodes, wrote the Spectator in 1866, but ‘tell him that in three years he may own a house and farm, and the same man, if he be energetic and sensible, will slowly make up his mind to leave his village’.

    John Stephens, the editor of the South Australian Register, wrote that an honest, sober and industrious man and three sturdy sons could count on earning at least £120 a year by taking up the offer of free passage from Britain

    ‘In a very short space of time, you may find yourself as independent as a “Lord of the Manor”’, he wrote in the pamphlet Address to the Starving or Suffering Millions of Great Britain and Ireland in 1847. ‘Contrast such a state of things with your hopeless position in the land of your birth… Long and vainly might you toil and sweat, and groan, amidst insult, injury, and wrong, before one of you could, by any chance, become possessed of a single acre in the British Isles.’

    Australians are not held back by the social rigidity that saps the British; they frown on the dispiriting nepotism that drains the energy from some developing economies; they would never succumb to the voodoo fatalism that disempowers the people of some cultures from changing their lives for better or worse; Australians (at least until recently) were not allowed to wallow in the mire of victimhood, which becomes a permanent excuse for failure. ‘Aristocratic nations are naturally too liable to narrow the scope of human perfectibility’, said Tocqueville. ‘Democratic nations, to expand it beyond reason.’

    Australia, unlike America, was settled in the age of Enlightenment. When the Pilgrim Fathers sighted the Massachusetts coast in 1620, they gathered for a Bible reading; when the First Fleet arrived in Sydney Cove, the new arrivals knuckled down to work; it was eight days before the chaplain could organise a church service. It is not the hand of God or the hand of fate that built Australia but human ingenuity and human labour. There was no need to succumb to fatalism and just wait for something to turn up because something already had: its people.

    The above is an extract from Nick Cater’s new book, The Lucky Culture (and the Rise of an Australian Ruling Class), published by HarperCollins this week in Australia. An e-book edition is available through Amazon. To order a printed edition in the UK, email Nick Cater here . For more on the book, visit luckyculture.com.au and see this week’s spiked review of books published on Friday.


  30. lobo91
    30 | April 27, 2013 12:14 am

    Bumr50 wrote:

    @ lobo91:
    Are they difficult?

    There are two parts, Basic Instructor Training and then the individual discipline courses. You normally take BIT in conjunction with your first discipline course. Since I’ve already taken it, I get to skip that part.

    The discipline courses aren’t particularly difficult. We basically go through the lesson plan and then go out and shoot some of the exercises from the class, just to make sure that everyone is competent.

    Some people have a little trouble with BIT, I guess, but I spent most of my military career as an instructor, and I’m also an OSHA outreach trainer, so it was a formality for me.


  31. Bumr50
    31 | April 27, 2013 12:20 am

    @ lobo91:

    That’s cool.

    Is it much of a drive for you?


  32. 32 | April 27, 2013 12:34 am

    @ Aussie Infidel:

    The British class system did not carry over into Australia is the thesis of this book. It does appear that way as Aussies tend to be very Individualistic from what I have seen.


  33. lobo91
    33 | April 27, 2013 12:45 am

    @ Bumr50:

    It’s a little over two hours from my place to Raton, and another 15 minutes from here to the center.

    I’m headed for bed, since I have to bet up in the morning.

    Good night


  34. Bumr50
    34 | April 27, 2013 12:52 am

    @ lobo91:

    Good night.


  35. Aussie Infidel
    35 | April 27, 2013 1:58 am

    @ Rodan:
    They do tend to be that way.

    The cut out Aussie character, of the Crocodile Dundee type, actually does exist but it’s the exception rather than the rule in what is a rather urbanised population in Oz. That said there is still a strong remnant of ‘mateship’ within the Australian psyche. ‘Big noters’ and egotists tend to get cut down to size ruthlessly. That said the attitude about someone who makes it big, is “how do I get some of that sort of action”. Ostentatious displays of wealth or privilege get pilloried in the ‘aussie square’.

    And aussies really do jump into the front seat of a cab, with the driver, who then waxes lyrical about who’d doing what to whom and who’s paying…. whether you want it or not! :)


  36. Moe Katz
    36 | April 27, 2013 3:05 am

    In memoriam.


  37. BatGuano
    37 | April 27, 2013 3:52 am

    @ Moe Katz:
    Thanks for posting this. All of my family is from the south so I grew up on him. I wish during his life time he had gained a wider audience.


  38. Moe Katz
    38 | April 27, 2013 4:24 am

    @ BatGuano:
    Another great Texan….


  39. BatGuano
    39 | April 27, 2013 4:34 am

    Moe Katz wrote:

    Another great Texan….

    Yes. My Mom’s Dad was born in Texas and My Dad’s Mom was born in Texas and my whole family used to live there: Odessa to be exact.


  40. BatGuano
    40 | April 27, 2013 4:37 am

    And of course the greatest Texan of all was born there: Buddy Holly.


  41. Moe Katz
    41 | April 27, 2013 4:42 am

    @ BatGuano:
    So many of them. Willie Nelson’s my favorite, I guess. Just a year or two younger than Possum …


  42. Moe Katz
    42 | April 27, 2013 4:44 am

    @ BatGuano:
    I’d love to live in Austin, just for the music scene.


  43. 43 | April 27, 2013 4:47 am

    There are worse places to live than Texas…


  44. 44 | April 27, 2013 4:49 am

    @ Moe Katz:

    Austin is Texas’ answer to Berzerkly…


  45. BatGuano
    45 | April 27, 2013 4:49 am

    @ Moe Katz:
    Austin is a liberal college town but they have great music. I watched “Austin City Limits” for 30 years. Also, I hear that there is great food there so F*** there politics.


  46. Moe Katz
    46 | April 27, 2013 4:53 am

    @ Mike C.:
    @ BatGuano:
    I’m from Canada, the French part no less, so I’m used to annoying lefties…


  47. Moe Katz
    47 | April 27, 2013 4:55 am

    Attention Mike: Watch the fingerstyle guitar solo on the George Jones video -- on a Telecaster, but with finger rolls a la Merle Travis.


  48. BatGuano
    48 | April 27, 2013 4:56 am

    Mike C. wrote:

    @ Moe Katz:
    Austin is Texas’ answer to Berzerkly…

    Quite right. The liberal students benefit from their conservative ancestors who afforded them an education.


  49. BatGuano
    49 | April 27, 2013 5:05 am

    @ Moe Katz:
    I love the way he uses all four fingers and his thumb. And the thumb pick is all he uses like Travis.


  50. Moe Katz
    50 | April 27, 2013 5:10 am

    @ BatGuano:
    Yep, that’s a tasty fingerstyle solo. Rockabilly had its practitioners too, like Carl Perkins and Elvis’s Scotty Moore. I’m still hoping to play a little fingerstyle but never find the time … easier just to listen to Chet and Merle :(


  51. Moe Katz
    51 | April 27, 2013 5:13 am

    Better get some sleep, Mrs. Moe and I are moving house at the moment.


  52. BatGuano
    52 | April 27, 2013 5:16 am

    Moe Katz wrote:

    Better get some sleep, Mrs. Moe and I are moving house at the moment.

    Good night. Let us remember all the great music and innovation that rockabilly has given us. :)


  53. Moe Katz
    53 | April 27, 2013 5:18 am

    @ BatGuano:
    Yes, I’m just working through the collected Sun recordings of Jerry Lee Lewis. Goodnight!


  54. BatGuano
    54 | April 27, 2013 5:24 am

    @ Moe Katz:
    Sun is a treasure trove!


  55. BatGuano
    55 | April 27, 2013 5:27 am

    Mike C, I reaaly want an Ar-15 but cannot find defenite pricing on the internets.
    What range am I looking at?


  56. 56 | April 27, 2013 5:54 am

    BatGuano wrote:

    Mike C, I reaaly want an Ar-15 but cannot find defenite pricing on the internets.
    What range am I looking at?

    To be honest, and particularly these days, I don’t know, because I’ve never bought one or even very seriously considered doing so. Pre-panic, I think they ran from about $ 800-1200 for basic, and up to over $ 2000 for the latest gas-piston upper versions from the majors like S&W. Infinitely customizeable, of course.

    I just bought a Mini-14 (SS, synthetic but normal stock), and the only addition I made was a Burris mini-red dot sight on a GG&G rail. Just $ 240 or so for that.

    Supply has, if not caught up to, at least approached demand, and if you go to someplace like Gander Mountain on the day they get their resupply truck in, they’ve been trying to hold prices to pre-panic levels, and that’s probably where the best deals are. You can always buy a basic model and spend money adding better bits and bobs as the budget allows.


  57. 57 | April 27, 2013 5:59 am

    @ Mike C.:

    ADDENDUM -- Note that the sky is really the limit for ARs. You can buy titanium versions with super match grade barrels and hang thousands of dollars’ worth of optics off them. Okay, its still not as much as an H&H double rifle, of course, but it ain’t cheap, either.


  58. 58 | April 27, 2013 6:03 am

    @ Mike C.:

    ADDENDUM II -- One criteria I use is this question… Am I better than the gun under consideration? Am I likely to get better than the gun under consideration? If the answer to those question is “no”, then its good enough. Unless you’re just going for that whole status thing, which a lot of people do.


  59. BatGuano
    59 | April 27, 2013 6:07 am

    @ Mike C.:
    The 2 grand thing is what I thought. At least I know where I am. I must think on it.


  60. 60 | April 27, 2013 6:09 am

    Ruger SR-556, MSRP $1995, gas-piston upper, IIRC.
    http://www.ruger.com/products/sr556Standard/specSheets/5902.html

    S&W M&P versions, starting at less than $ 900 MSRP and going up…
    http://www.smith-wesson.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Category4_750001_750051_787653_-1_757785_757784_image


  61. BatGuano
    61 | April 27, 2013 6:17 am

    @ Mike C.:
    Wow! It’s like buying a car 50 years ago.Is the 327 ok or do I need the 396? Three on the tree or four on the floor? what the hell is a turboglide? Thanks, Mike. I need to do lots of research.


  62. 62 | April 27, 2013 6:21 am

    @ BatGuano:

    http://www.ar15.com


  63. 63 | April 27, 2013 6:36 am

    I think I paid about $ 750 for my Mini-14, state tax included, but that was pre-2012 election. This one… http://www.ruger.com/products/mini14RanchRifle/specSheets/5805.html

    I see the MSRP is now a whopping $ 979. Ouch! While there’s not quite the array of goodies available to AR owners, I could yank the action out of the factory stock and make it all sorts of Tacti-Cool if I felt like it. I use the (most states) standard 20 round magazines, personally, but there are factory and aftermarket mags ranging from 5 to 30 round capacity, and even some of those insane double-drum devices that hold a lot more.


  64. 64 | April 27, 2013 6:46 am

    @ Mike C.:

    Oops -- wrong model. http://www.ruger.com/products/mini14RanchRifle/specSheets/5817.html

    MSRP $ 1039. Double ouch!


  65. coldwarrior
    65 | April 27, 2013 9:22 am

    @ Bumr50:

    upmc treats their nurses and staff like shit. upmc’s management is asking for the that shop to get unionized. upmc’s nurse/patient ratio is rediculous. yeah yeah, says the naysayers on this blog, until its your ass in the hospital bed and your nurse has 8 or 9 patients to take care of.

    this follows coldwarrior’s adage: companies who have unions usually did a whole bunch to deserve them.


  66. Calo
    66 | April 27, 2013 9:57 am

    @ coldwarrior:
    Here’s another avenue to explore.
    http://www.workingnurse.com/articles/The-Nurse-Patient-Ratio-Five-Years-Later


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