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Angela Corey’s disturbing past; and a real life Atticus Finch

by Speranza ( 74 Comments › )
Filed under Crime, Humor at July 19th, 2013 - 9:25 am

She is an unscrupulous, vindictive, and dictatorial monster.

by Ian Tuttle

Angela Corey, by all accounts, is no Atticus Finch. She is “one hell of a trial lawyer,” says a Florida defense attorney who has known her for three decades — but the woman who has risen to national prominence as the “tough as nails” state attorney who prosecuted George Zimmerman is known for scorching the earth. And some of her prosecutorial conduct has been, well, troubling at best.

Corey, a Jacksonville native, took a degree in marketing from Florida State University before pursuing her J.D. at the University of Florida. She became a Florida prosecutor in 1981 and tried everything from homicides to juvenile cases in the ensuing 26 years. In 2008, Corey was elected state attorney for Florida’s Fourth Judicial Circuit, taking over from Harry Shorstein — the five-term state attorney who had fired her from his office a year earlier, citing “long-term issues” regarding her supervisory performance.

When Corey came in, she cleaned house. Corey fired half of the office’s investigators, two-fifths of its victim advocates, a quarter of its 35 paralegals, and 48 other support staff — more than one-fifth of the office. Then she sent a letter to Florida’s senators demanding that they oppose Shorstein’s pending nomination as a U.S. attorney.  [........]

Corey knows about personal vendettas. They seem to be her specialty. When Ron Littlepage, a journalist for the Florida Times-Union, wrote a column criticizing her handling of the Christian Fernandez case — in which Corey chose to prosecute a twelve-year-old boy for first-degree murder, who wound up locked in solitary confinement in an adult jail prior to his court date — she “fired off a two-page, single-spaced letter on official state-attorney letterhead hinting at lawsuits for libel.”

And that was moderate. When Corey was appointed to handle the Zimmerman case, Talbot “Sandy” D’Alemberte, a former president of both the American Bar Association and Florida State University, criticized the decision: “I cannot imagine a worse choice for a prosecutor to serve in the Sanford case. There is nothing in Angela Corey’s background that suits her for the task, and she cannot command the respect of people who care about justice.” Corey responded by making a public-records request of the university for all e-mails, text messages, and phone messages in which D’Alemberte had mentioned Fernandez. [.........]

Not many people are willing to cross Corey. A Florida attorney I spoke with declined to go on record because of “concerns about retaliation” — that attorney has pending cases that will require Corey’s cooperation. [.........] And to think: D’Alemberte crossed Corey twice. He should get a medal.

But what these instances point to is something much more alarming than Corey’s less-than-warm relations with her peers.

In June 2012, Alan Dershowitz, a well-known defense attorney who has been a professor at Harvard Law School for nearly half a century, criticized Corey for her affidavit in the Zimmerman case. Making use of a quirk of Florida law that gives prosecutors, for any case except first-degree murder, the option of filing an affidavit with the judge instead of going to a grand jury, Corey filed an affidavit that, according to Dershowitz, “willfully and deliberately omitted” crucial exculpatory evidence: namely, that Trayvon Martin was beating George Zimmerman bloody at the time of the fatal gunshot. So Corey avoided a grand jury, where her case likely would not have held water, and then withheld evidence in her affidavit to the judge. “It was a perjurious affidavit,” Dershowitz tells me, and that comes with serious consequences: “Submitting a false affidavit is grounds for disbarment.”

Shortly after Dershowitz’s criticisms, Harvard Law School’s dean’s office received a phone call. When the dean refused to pick up, Angela Corey spent a half hour demanding of an office-of-communications employee that Dershowitz be fired. According to Dershowitz, Corey threatened to sue Harvard, to try to get him disbarred, and also to sue him for slander and libel.  [........]

 What happened in the weeks and months that followed was instructive. Dershowitz says that he was flooded with correspondence from people telling him that this is Corey’s well-known M.O. He says numerous sources — lawyers who had sparred with Corey in the courtroom, lawyers who had worked with and for her, and even multiple judges — informed him that Corey has a history of vigorously attacking any and all who criticize her. But it’s worse than that: Correspondents told him that Corey has a history of overcharging and withholding evidence.

The Zimmerman trial is a clear case of the former and a probable case of the latter. Zimmerman was charged with second-degree murder, also known as “depraved mind” murder. The case law for that charge, an attorney who has worked in criminal prosecution outside Florida tells me, is near-unanimous: It almost never applies to one-on-one encounters. Second-degree murder is the madman who fires indiscriminately into a crowd or unlocks the lions’ cage at the zoo. “Nothing in the facts of this case approaches that.” [........] In fact, both the initial police investigation and the original state attorney in charge of the case had determined exactly that: There was no evidence of any crime, much less second-degree murder

But that did not stop Corey from zealously overcharging and — the facts suggest — withholding evidence to ensure that that charge stuck.

Still, by the end of the case it was clear that the jury was unlikely to convict Zimmerman of second-degree murder; hence the prosecution’s addition of a manslaughter charge — as well as its attempt to add a charge for third-degree murder by way of child abuse — after the trial had closed. [.........] It’s a permissible maneuver, but as a matter of professional ethics it’s a low blow.

Corey’s post-trial performance has been less than admirable as well. Asked in a prime-time interview with HLN how she would describe George Zimmerman, Corey responded, “Murderer.” Attorneys who spoke with me called her refusal to acknowledge the validity of the jury’s verdict everything from “disgusting” to “disgraceful.”

But will Corey ever be disciplined for prosecutorial abuses? It’s unlikely. State attorneys cannot be brought before the bar while they remain in office. Complaints can be filed against Corey, but they will be deferred until she is no longer state attorney. The governor can remove her from office, but otherwise her position — and her license — are safe.

Meanwhile, those who speak out against her continue to be mistreated. Ben Kruidbos (pronounced CRIED-boss), the IT director at Corey’s state-attorney office, was fired last week — one month after testifying during the Zimmerman trial that Corey had withheld from defense attorneys evidence obtained from Trayvon Martin’s cell phone. Corey’s office contends that Kruidbos was fired for poor job performance and for leaking personnel records. [.......] Less than two months before this letter, Kruidbos had received a raise for “meritorious performance.”

The records in question — Kruidbos maintains he had nothing to do with leaking them — revealed that Corey used $235,000 in taxpayer money to upgrade her pension and that of her co-prosecutor in the Zimmerman case, Bernie de la Rionda. The upgrade was legal, but Harry Shorstein, Corey’s predecessor, had said previously that using taxpayer funds to upgrade pensions was not “proper.”

Meanwhile, while Kruidbos has been forced out of the state attorney’s office, the managing director who wrote his termination letter — one Cheryl Peek — remains. In 1990 Peek was fired from the same state attorney’s office by Harry Shorstein’s predecessor, Ed Austin, for jury manipulation. Now, as managing director for that office, she trains lawyers in professional ethics.

Since her election, Corey seems to be determinedly purging from the ranks any who cross her and surrounding herself with inferiors whose ethical scruples appear to mirror her own.  [........]

“Make crime pay,” Will Rogers once quipped: “Become a lawyer.” Angela Corey seems to be less interested in making crime pay than in making her critics pay.

Read the rest - Angela Corey’s checkered past

The polar  opposite of Angela Corey (who would have made a perfect Soviet apparatchik), was Mark O’Mara and Don West, George Zimmerman’s defense lawyers who appealed to facts, reason and common sense.

by Peter Machera

Although George Zimmerman has finally been found not guilty, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid warned, “this isn’t over with.” Before the next drama unfolds, let’s take a moment to reflect on this ordeal. In doing so, real-life civic heroes emerge. Those men are Mark O’Mara and Don West. We can compare them to Atticus Finch from Harper Lee’s 1960 novel “To Kill a Mockingbird” in this respect: Under enormous pressure, they defended an innocent client whom vocal and powerful elements of society were quick to condemn.

In this classic portrayal of life in the Deep South, Tom Robinson is the hapless victim of a false rape accusation leveled in a society that was highly biased to believe the charges regardless of the evidence, or lack thereof. Atticus Finch is the defense attorney willing to endure the wrath of a hostile public in order to defend an innocent client, and ultimately, to do what is morally right. Mark O’Mara is modern-day America’s answer to Atticus Finch. Don West also deserves enormous credit, yet he does not have the detached and martyred air that Mr. O’Mara shares with Atticus. Mr. West could not contain his exasperation when faced with an incredibly unprofessional prosecution and judge. Mr. O’Mara, in an equally valid response, chose to keep his Zen.

Mr. O’Mara betrays a steely toughness with a Giuliani-esqe lisp. During the news conference after the verdict, a reporter from the Times of London tritely asked, “You mentioned something about George wanting to get his life back there’s one person who’s not going to. Have you got any words for the family of Trayvon Martin?” Mr. O’Mara genuflected appropriately to indicate his sympathy, but then continued:

“I’m not going to shy away from the fact that the evidence supported that George Zimmerman did nothing wrong, and that he was battered and beaten by a 17-year-old who for whatever reason, we won’t know, thought that he had to lash out and attack violently.  [........]

“Do you have any message?” the reporter asked again, undeterred. And this is the way it goes. When it comes to the media, any voice that contradicts their viewpoint tends to speak right past them. Reporters’ follow-up questions often show no indication that they have mentally absorbed the initial response.  [........]

Atticus and Mr. O’Mara share a quality that Ernest Hemingway called “grace under fire”; they throw themselves unflinchingly into a worthy cause. Says Atticus to his young daughter Scout about his trial:

” you’ll have to keep your head about far worse things sometimes we have to make the best of things, and the way we conduct ourselves when the chips are down maybe you’ll look back on this with some compassion and some feeling that I didn’t let you down. This case, Tom Robinson’s case, is something that goes to the essence of a man’s conscience — Scout, I couldn’t go to church and worship God if I didn’t try to help that man.”

He continues, “The one thing that doesn’t abide by majority rule is a person’s conscience.” Let’s be grateful this wasn’t trial by majority as conceived by CNN or MSNBC, in which case Mr. Zimmerman would have been locked up without a key.

In his acerbic wit and his exasperation with the incompetence of those around him, Mr. West reminds one of the “Breaking Bad” character Walter White. “This case went from tragedy to travesty,” he explained to reporters after the verdict, refusing to assume the meekly magnanimous tone one might otherwise expect. What does he mean by “travesty” a reporter asked, as though that were not self-evident. “The travesty would have been a travesty of justice had George Zimmerman been convicted.” Was Judge Debra Nelson fair? “I’d like to keep my bar license for a couple of years,” he responded, provoking the reporters to laughter, leaving unspoken his obvious meaning.  [.......]

It’s almost startling to see individuals on television who are intelligent, articulate and fight for a worthy cause. We have plenty of smart people deceiving the public, but not much of the sort who actually speak truth to power, and this is what the O’Mara-West defense team represents, considering the power structures they were up against.

In the end, the jury made the only sensible decision. However, speaking on “Meet the Press,” the Rev. Al Sharpton reminds us ominously that the advocates for Trayvon have not “exhausted their legal options.” One can just hope that Mr. O’Mara and Mr. West will continue to play the virtuous lawyers against the cynical — and significant — political forces that oppose them.

Read the rest – The defender Mark O’Mara, a real life Atticus Finch

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74 Responses to “Angela Corey’s disturbing past; and a real life Atticus Finch”
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  1. Speranza
    2 | July 19, 2013 9:30 am

    Rick Scott the governor of Florida (a Republican soon to be voted out of office) is an asshole.


  2. 4 | July 19, 2013 9:41 am

    It is heartening to note that in the American Film Institute’s 50 greatest heroes and villains, Atticus Finch was No. 1.

    Corey should be removed from office -- either by the electorate or by the governor. She is in many ways worse than Mike Nifong (Duke LAX case) because it appears Nifong was only an opportunistic asshole in that particular incident, pandering to the mob to be re-elected.

    Corey’s pattern and practice is disgraceful, and her screaming LIBEL at any criticism indicates she is not only overly sensitive but somewhat mentally unhinged. I watch her press conferences -- the only thing missing from her on the podium is a pointy hat and a broom.


  3. 5 | July 19, 2013 9:47 am

    But will Corey ever be disciplined for prosecutorial abuses? It’s unlikely. State attorneys cannot be brought before the bar while they remain in office.

    That is actually scary. I don’t think we can rely on Scott to do his duty and remove this cretin, either. I’m glad I no longer live in Florida. This person should be disbarred. She willfully interfered with Zimmerman’s ability to get a fair trial. Between Corey and the Judge, it is kind of startling that Zimmerman was acquitted. It was justice that he be acquitted, but it is still surprising. There was an immense amount of pressure on this Jury to convict, as there will no doub tbe pressure on the Civil Rights jury to convict if (if? more like when) Holder brings those charges. There is less evidence for a Civil Rights charge than there was fo r Murder, but that won’t deter our JustUs Department.


  4. 6 | July 19, 2013 9:47 am

    @ Speranza:

    And considering the abysmal state of British dentistry…..


  5. 8 | July 19, 2013 10:04 am

    @ MacDuff:

    That’s not goingto be popular with his fan base. It takes real courage for a black person to stand up to the racists in their midst that wanted Zimmerman convicted no matter what the evidence showed, especially when you count the President of the United States in that group. A President who is know to be as vindictive as Angela Corey, as a matter of fact.


  6. 9 | July 19, 2013 10:04 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    And last time I heard, obstruction of justice was a criminal offense. Odd that it would be the prosecutor that should be charged.


  7. 10 | July 19, 2013 10:08 am

    @ Carolina Girl:

    Once the prosecution was completed, she began her campaign of public persecution whilst being paid by the people of Florida.

    Is not the way officials, from Corey to Holder, to Obama have disregarded the lawful verdict of a jury in favor of pursuing their personal vision of “justice” unprecedented? I always assumed that, once the case was over, an unwritten “stand down and STFU” rule prevailed. I guess I assumeth to much…..


  8. Speranza
    11 | July 19, 2013 10:09 am

    Carolina Girl wrote:

    Corey should be removed from office — either by the electorate or by the governor. She is in many ways worse than Mike Nifong (Duke LAX case) because it appears Nifong was only an opportunistic asshole in that particular incident, pandering to the mob to be re-elected.

    The comparisons with Mike Nifong are appropriate. Two liars who were not out to let the facts fall where they may but to manipulate things for political reasons.


  9. Speranza
    12 | July 19, 2013 10:13 am

    Carolina Girl wrote:

    @ Speranza:
    And considering the abysmal state of British dentistry…..

    Yeah how could they tell? lol


  10. Speranza
    13 | July 19, 2013 10:14 am

    Iron Fist wrote:

    @ MacDuff:
    That’s not goingto be popular with his fan base. It takes real courage for a black person to stand up to the racists in their midst that wanted Zimmerman convicted no matter what the evidence showed, especially when you count the President of the United States in that group. A President who is know to be as vindictive as Angela Corey, as a matter of fact.

    Actually the people keeping this issue alive are the MSM and the white doofus hipsters.


  11. 14 | July 19, 2013 10:14 am

    @ Speranza:
    Unfortunately I agree with this. He probably released documents for the prosecution. Now saying that, I also agree with his frustration and desire to show the true Jahar.


  12. 15 | July 19, 2013 10:17 am

    @ Carolina Girl:

    There’s a reason I didn’t go to law school. I don’t know how common this behavior is among prosecutors. I haven’t been prosecuted enough to know :mrgreen: She certainly obstructed Zimmerman’s ability to get a fair trial. Fortunately he was acquitted despite all of the illegal manouvering on the part of the prosecutor. But I’ll tell you, if we can’t hold prosecutors to the law, the law has lost any moral imperitive for the rest of us. Our legal system needs reform from the top down. If Holder can get away with things like Fast and Furious, none of us are safe from things like manufactured evidence and wrongful prosecution.


  13. 16 | July 19, 2013 10:18 am

    @ Speranza:

    I’m surprised the Florida Bar Association does not have the ability to conduct it’s own internal investigation via whatever Ethics Oversight body they have in place (think of it as Internal Affairs, but for lawyers). No lawyer, prosecutor or otherwise, should enjoy any sort of immunity for investigation/charges for misconduct simply because of the office they hold.

    This woman has almost a criminal pattern of conduct and the Florida State Bar should be employing every means at their disposal to hold her responsible for her conduct.


  14. 17 | July 19, 2013 10:24 am

    @ Carolina Girl:

    Yeah, if anybody needs to be brought up on Civil Rights charges it is Angela Corey. She violated Zimmerman’s right to a fair trial. I don’t care how much she wanted to win this, withholding exculpatory evidence is a crime. While the defense didn’t wind up using that evidence, she still withheld it until one of her employees blew the whistle on her and revealed that she was hiding it. That is simply unacceptable.


  15. 18 | July 19, 2013 10:29 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    And I hope Kruidbos retains a good labor and employment attorney, because his dismissal smacks of retaliation. And Corey should be aware that during Discovery, she will be forced to prove that Kruidbos was the one who leaked the “personal” information -- she doesn’t get to fire him on a hunch. And since Angela and truth in evidence are not exactly bosom buddies, my guess is she tries to fake the proof -- and you as an IT professional know that a good forensic computer geek can prove that its bogus.

    I’m going to predict Angela is gone by the end of the year. That strong sunlight shining on her pattern and practices will force Scott to fire her.


  16. RIX
    19 | July 19, 2013 10:31 am

    @ MacDuff:
    Hey Mac, Corey & Holder would have been good Party
    members in 3o’s Germany & the old Soviet Union.
    Jesse Jackson wants to take the Zimmerman Case
    before the U.N Human Rights Commission & Sharpton
    wants demonstrations in 100 cities. To accomplis what?
    Race realations are being destroyed & Zimmerman
    has somehow become a stand in for slave owners.


  17. Speranza
    20 | July 19, 2013 10:36 am

    @ RIX:
    Jesse Jackson the ultimate attention whore. He makes the Kardashian’s seem like wilting flowers.


  18. Speranza
    21 | July 19, 2013 10:37 am

    Iron Fist wrote:

    @ Carolina Girl:
    Yeah, if anybody needs to be brought up on Civil Rights charges it is Angela Corey. She violated Zimmerman’s right to a fair trial. I don’t care how much she wanted to win this, withholding exculpatory evidence is a crime. While the defense didn’t wind up using that evidence, she still withheld it until one of her employees blew the whistle on her and revealed that she was hiding it. That is simply unacceptable.

    Prosecutors gone wild is as much a threat to our liberties as street thugs.


  19. Speranza
    22 | July 19, 2013 10:38 am

    Carolina Girl wrote:

    This woman has almost a criminal pattern of conduct and the Florida State Bar should be employing every means at their disposal to hold her responsible for her conduct.

    She has a future awaiting her as a legal commentator on MSNBC.


  20. Speranza
    23 | July 19, 2013 10:39 am

    MacDuff wrote:

    Is not the way officials, from Corey to Holder, to Obama have disregarded the lawful verdict of a jury in favor of pursuing their personal vision of “justice” unprecedented?

    They believe in a “living law” and a “living constitution” i.e one that suits their political purposes.


  21. Speranza
    24 | July 19, 2013 10:41 am

    Carolina Girl wrote:

    That strong sunlight shining on her pattern and practices will force Scott to fire her.

    Next year the voters of Florida are going to fire Rick Scott. Unfortunately a likely replacement is douche bag (and GOP Establishment favorite) Charlie Crist who is running as a Democrat.


  22. 25 | July 19, 2013 10:45 am

    Carolina Girl wrote:

    @ Speranza:

    I’m surprised the Florida Bar Association does not have the ability to conduct it’s own internal investigation via whatever Ethics Oversight body they have in place (think of it as Internal Affairs, but for lawyers). No lawyer, prosecutor or otherwise, should enjoy any sort of immunity for investigation/charges for misconduct simply because of the office they hold.

    This woman has almost a criminal pattern of conduct and the Florida State Bar should be employing every means at their disposal to hold her responsible for her conduct.

    No one in power seems to be held accountable for anything any more. IRS, NSA, Benghazi, Fast and Furious, bloody DETROIT (and many more I’ve failed to mention) and no one has even lost their job, much less been brought up on charges.

    Hell, a friggin’ hurricane pretty much scuttled and discredited the last administration!

    I just saw the leadership of Detroit spinning fiscal armageddon brought about by decades of criminal mismanagement as a force of nature that was unfortunate and unavoidable!


  23. RIX
    26 | July 19, 2013 10:46 am

    Speranza wrote:

    @ RIX:
    Jesse Jackson the ultimate attention whore. He makes the Kardashian’s seem like wilting flowers.

    But he rhymes a lot.


  24. 27 | July 19, 2013 10:46 am

    RIX wrote:

    Race realations are being destroyed

    It is not in the interest of the race hustlers for race relation sto get better. The race hustlers get paid big bucks to stoke the fires of intolerance. If they were to ever admit that they won the Civil Rights movement, they’d be out of a job. That is one reasson that the Civil Rights movement morphed from wanting equal rights (something I support) to wanting special rights (something I am against). They won’t be happy until they get Jim Crow re-implemented, but with the blacks on top instead of whites (who will be on the bottom).


  25. 28 | July 19, 2013 10:50 am

    @ Speranza:

    Yeah, I’m sure they’ll see her as their answer to Greta Van Sustern and Kimberly Guilfoyle. The difference is that the two of them have actual ETHICS.


  26. RIX
    29 | July 19, 2013 10:51 am

    Sean Jenkins @super_sean12

    Senator Bobby Rush (D) of Illinois response when asked about racial profiling in Trayvon case. “There is evidence Trayvon is dead”#logicbomb
    8:57 PM -- 18 Jul 2013

    HT Twitchy.
    I saw this Hannity interview last night,
    it was actually shocking.
    If only the jury knew that Trayvon was
    actually dead, I guess that the verdict
    would have been different.


  27. 30 | July 19, 2013 10:51 am

    @ Speranza:

    Unless Scott is primaried out. Let’s see who they can come up with instead.


  28. RIX
    31 | July 19, 2013 10:56 am

    They won’t be happy until they get Jim Crow re-implemented, but with the blacks on top instead of whites @ Iron Fist:

    Race baiting and hustling is a huge industry ,
    with lots of extortion.
    Jesse Jackson threatens Anheuser Bush & voila, his
    son Yousef gets the Near North distributorship in
    Chicago.


  29. 32 | July 19, 2013 10:58 am

    @ RIX:

    Jesse Jerkson is a one-man RICO operation. But the country as a whole is growing weary of all this race-baiting from the left. This country is SO RACIST than an incompetent half-Black asshole was elected President not once but twice.


  30. 33 | July 19, 2013 11:02 am

    @ Carolina Girl:

    Yeah, Scott seemslike a perfect candidate for primarying. Of course, the Republican Establishment wants Charlie Crist, so they would be against any Republican that ran against him. You need no more than that for proof that the Republican Establishment is totally in bed with the Democrats.


  31. 34 | July 19, 2013 11:05 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    I don’t know about that -- let’s remember how Crist took all that money from the GOP and laughed about not giving it back when he switched his party affiliation.

    I’d love to see the “base” (oh that WORD!) find a conservative Hispanic a la Rubio (well, pre-Amnesty Rubio) to run for governor. Every speech he or she makes should have as its cornerstone the first thing they’ll do when they get in office is FIRE Angela Corey.


  32. RIX
    35 | July 19, 2013 11:09 am

    Carolina Girl wrote:

    @ RIX:

    Jesse Jerkson is a one-man RICO operation. But the country as a whole is growing weary of all this race-baiting from the left. This country is SO RACIST than an incompetent half-Black asshole was elected President not once but twice.

    As a kid working as a gofer on a construction site,
    I witnessed him enter the trailer with the contractor.
    Ten minutes later Jesse came out & he and his group
    left.
    The contractor said, “I gave him an envelope with cash,
    let’s get back to work.”


  33. Speranza
    36 | July 19, 2013 11:11 am

    Carolina Girl wrote:

    @ Iron Fist:
    I don’t know about that — let’s remember how Crist took all that money from the GOP and laughed about not giving it back when he switched his party affiliation.
    I’d love to see the “base” (oh that WORD!) find a conservative Hispanic a la Rubio (well, pre-Amnesty Rubio) to run for governor. Every speech he or she makes should have as its cornerstone the first thing they’ll do when they get in office is FIRE Angela Corey.

    Crist give the term “cynical politicians” a very new meaning. He is reptilian in the extreme. The GOP has an opening now playing the Hispanic victim card to the Hispanic community. “See the Democrats want to railroad an innocent Hispanic” and if any one claims Zimmerman is not a “complete” Hispanic they can say then Obama is not a “complete” Black. However the GOP is the Stupid Party for a reason.


  34. Speranza
    37 | July 19, 2013 11:12 am

    Iron Fist wrote:

    @ Carolina Girl:
    Yeah, Scott seemslike a perfect candidate for primarying. Of course, the Republican Establishment wants Charlie Crist, so they would be against any Republican that ran against him. You need no more than that for proof that the Republican Establishment is totally in bed with the Democrats.

    Charlie Crist changed his registration to Democrat.


  35. 38 | July 19, 2013 11:12 am

    When backed into a corner and forced to choose, people will side with their “tribe”, however their tribe is defined. That’s just the way we’re programmed. The point is to allow our intellectual capacity to transcend our basic programming, but this type of rhetoric, and continued behavior, does just the opposite- it doesn’t appeal to our higher intellect as much as it appeals to our basic nature.

    I chose intellectualism long ago but if we’re to go tribal, fine. I like my tribe’s chances.


  36. Speranza
    39 | July 19, 2013 11:13 am

    Carolina Girl wrote:

    @ Speranza:
    Yeah, I’m sure they’ll see her as their answer to Greta Van Sustern and Kimberly Guilfoyle. The difference is that the two of them have actual ETHICS.

    She will be on Chris Matthews show any day now.


  37. lobo91
    40 | July 19, 2013 11:16 am

    MacDuff wrote:

    When backed into a corner and forced to choose, people will side with their “tribe”, however their tribe is defined. That’s just the way we’re programmed. The point is to allow our intellectual capacity to transcend our basic programming, but this type of rhetoric, and continued behavior, does just the opposite- it doesn’t appeal to our higher intellect as much as it appeals to our basic nature.

    See also:

    Bill Cosby Called An “Uncle Tom N*gger” For Not Calling Zimmerman A Racist…

    The tribe has spoken.


  38. 41 | July 19, 2013 11:20 am

    @ lobo91:

    It is undeniable that most, though not all, blacks feel that Trayvon Martin had a right to beat up George Zimmerman because he was white. It is hard to get around calling that racism.


  39. 42 | July 19, 2013 11:30 am

    @ RIX:

    He shook down NASCAR for over $250,000 for his Rainbow/PUSH coalition. Said there should be Black drivers because they can drive cars fast as well.


  40. 43 | July 19, 2013 11:32 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    Actually, to hear most blacks tell it, don’t even know that it was Martin beating up Zimmerman. They seem to think Zimmerman shot Martin in cold blood after Zimmerman “confronted” him.


  41. RIX
    44 | July 19, 2013 11:33 am

    Iron Fist wrote:

    @ lobo91:

    It is undeniable that most, though not all, blacks feel that Trayvon Martin had a right to beat up George Zimmerman because he was white. It is hard to get around calling that racism.

    In some ways Zimmerman represents Every “White” Man,
    to many Blacks.
    As such, Zimmerman attacked Trayvon, even though the
    evidence says otherwise.
    Or, Zimmerman was hardly injured & just wanted to
    murder Trayvon.
    Or, because of past transgressions Zimmerman had
    a duty to take the beat down & if he died, he died.


  42. Speranza
    45 | July 19, 2013 11:35 am

    RIX wrote:

    In some ways Zimmerman represents Every “White” Man,
    to many Blacks.

    Oh I quite agree.

    Or, because of past transgressions Zimmerman had
    a duty to take the beat down & if he died, he died.

    Yes he carrries the burden of “white racism”.


  43. Speranza
    46 | July 19, 2013 11:37 am

    Carolina Girl wrote:

    @ RIX:
    He shook down NASCAR for over $250,000 for his Rainbow/PUSH coalition. Said there should be Black drivers because they can drive cars fast as well.

    He is a professional extortionist that Mafia goons could admire.


  44. 47 | July 19, 2013 11:39 am

    @ Speranza:

    Indeed. Frankly, he and Sharpton both belong in fetching orange jumpsuits and looking through bars.


  45. 48 | July 19, 2013 11:39 am

    Work beckons, all y’all.
    Rodan, we need a radio show. Soon.


  46. RIX
    49 | July 19, 2013 11:40 am

    Carolina Girl wrote:

    @ RIX:

    He shook down NASCAR for over $250,000 for his Rainbow/PUSH coalition. Said there should be Black drivers because they can drive cars fast as well.

    He is a long time extortionist & a creation
    of the Media.


  47. Speranza
    50 | July 19, 2013 11:41 am

    Carolina Girl wrote:

    Work beckons, all y’all.
    Rodan, we need a radio show. Soon.

    Why? We are the only ones calling.


  48. Speranza
    51 | July 19, 2013 11:42 am

    Carolina Girl wrote:

    @ Speranza:
    Indeed. Frankly, he and Sharpton both belong in fetching orange jumpsuits and looking through bars.

    Sharpton is responsible for the Brawley fraud and the Freddie’s Fashion Mart fire.


  49. RIX
    52 | July 19, 2013 11:42 am

    Speranza wrote:

    RIX wrote:

    In some ways Zimmerman represents Every “White” Man,
    to many Blacks.

    Oh I quite agree.

    Or, because of past transgressions Zimmerman had
    a duty to take the beat down & if he died, he died.

    Yes he carrries the burden of “white racism”.

    Right & now the DOJ has a snitch line to
    fabricate racism on the part of Zimmerman.


  50. 53 | July 19, 2013 11:45 am

    @ Carolina Girl:
    That is because that is the way NBC portrayed it. I hope Zimmerman gets $20 million out of them.


  51. 54 | July 19, 2013 11:48 am

    @ RIX:
    Which is in and of itself a racist violation of Zimmerman’s civil rights. I can tell you from personal experience that DoJ doesn’t even notice local cases like this when it is blacks attacking a white.


  52. 55 | July 19, 2013 11:51 am

    Here’s another vendetta junkie who’s also a porn junkie…currently in trouble for cyberstalking and harassing country musician John Rich


  53. RIX
    56 | July 19, 2013 11:52 am

    Iron Fist wrote:

    @ RIX:
    Which is in and of itself a racist violation of Zimmerman’s civil rights. I can tell you from personal experience that DoJ doesn’t even notice local cases like this when it is blacks attacking a white.

    It is outrageous , but the MSM is cool with it.
    Later Gators.


  54. lobo91
    57 | July 19, 2013 11:57 am

    @ Carolina Girl:

    If Trayvon’s “parents” were smart, they’d take their million dollar extortion payout from the HOA and walk away, but they aren’t.

    They may think their pending civil suit against Zimmerman will go the same way the criminal trial did, with them free to slander Zimmerman at will, and the defense unable to say anything negative about their spawn, but that’s not going to happen.

    In a civil suit, they’re going to see every sordid detail of their dysfunctional lives scrutinized in open court.

    Someone really ought to explain that to them.


  55. 58 | July 19, 2013 11:57 am

    Carolina Girl wrote:

    @ Iron Fist:
    Actually, to hear most blacks tell it, don’t even know that it was Martin beating up Zimmerman. They seem to think Zimmerman shot Martin in cold blood after Zimmerman “confronted” him.

    One very plausible explanation for why Trayvon attacked Zimmerman.

    I can’t believe how completely brain-dead some people can be, and still be able to go out the door and go from place to place.

    That said, “purple drank,” excessive use of cannabis, heavy drinking, and who knows what other recreational chemicals, can *ahem* lead to immature and volatile people such as Trayvon and Rachel drawing the wrong conclusions in a situation that is confusing to them.


  56. 59 | July 19, 2013 11:58 am

    lobo91 wrote:

    In a civil suit, they’re going to see every sordid detail of their dysfunctional lives scrutinized in open court.

    Someone really ought to explain that to them.

    It is obvious to me that they have no concept of shame, and would not be able to comprehend the consequences of their actions in this or any other regard.


  57. 60 | July 19, 2013 12:02 pm

    I am considering going to Sharpton’s rally tomorrow downtown. But I have real reservations about going. This is a first for me. Normally, I am never worried about my safety. But this time, I’m not so sure.


  58. 61 | July 19, 2013 12:02 pm

    Iron Fist wrote:

    @ lobo91:
    It is undeniable that most, though not all, blacks feel that Trayvon Martin had a right to beat up George Zimmerman because he was white. It is hard to get around calling that racism.

    It’s worrisome how many people are out on the street, running around loose, who think they have a God-given entitlement to bully and abuse any of us European-Americans whenever they please, for no reason at all. It isn’t just racism; it’s pure evil.

    Their “churches” are often instigators of racial hatred. Nothing Christian about that!


  59. lobo91
    62 | July 19, 2013 12:05 pm

    @ 1389AD:

    It is obvious to me that they have no concept of shame, and would not be able to comprehend the consequences of their actions in this or any other regard.

    That’s why we refer to lawyers as “counselors.” It’s up to them to explain this to them.

    Of course, they won’t.


  60. lobo91
    63 | July 19, 2013 12:09 pm

    Well, Leia and I are on our way up to Denver for the Bloomberg counter-protest.

    Should be interesting


  61. waldensianspirit
    64 | July 19, 2013 12:22 pm

    Speranza wrote:

    Lee Rigby murder suspect Michael Adebolajo loses two teeth ‘in fight with prison staff following melee’ in Belmarsh high-security wing as Zip says “Feel good story of the day”.

    I think they should get him to the infirmary, patch him up a little and have another go tomorrow; a regular ground hog day


  62. 65 | July 19, 2013 12:26 pm

    1389AD wrote:

    lobo91 wrote:
    In a civil suit, they’re going to see every sordid detail of their dysfunctional lives scrutinized in open court.
    Someone really ought to explain that to them.
    It is obvious to me that they have no concept of shame, and would not be able to comprehend the consequences of their actions in this or any other regard.

    You are forgetting, that in a culture that celebrates being a Pimp, a prostitute, a drug dealer, a murderer or a gangster, whatever dysfunction is found in their lives will be considered celebrity enhancing characteristics.


  63. 66 | July 19, 2013 1:03 pm

    @ doriangrey:

    Yeah, if you went back in time 50-60 years, blacks would have most admired people like Frederick Douglass or, of course, Martin Luther King. Today it is street criminals and athletes (many of whom are criminals, themselves). There is no one on the current scene of the stature of a Douglass or King. Nobody even close, and if there were they’d be called an “Uncle Tom” for not bein g”authentic” enough. Which means not criminal enough. Andf then they blame “racism” for the fact that blacks are disporportionately in prison. This is all a mindset that has come about in my lifetime.


  64. 67 | July 19, 2013 1:18 pm

    Urban Infidel wrote:

    I am considering going to Sharpton’s rally tomorrow downtown. But I have real reservations about going. This is a first for me. Normally, I am never worried about my safety. But this time, I’m not so sure.

    It’s a really a Hipster rally that Sharpton is speaking at. You will be fine there.


  65. 68 | July 19, 2013 1:22 pm

    @ Speranza:

    The GOP has an opening now playing the Hispanic victim card to the Hispanic community.

    Would not fly with the today’s GOP base.


  66. 69 | July 19, 2013 1:22 pm

    New Thread.


  67. 70 | July 19, 2013 1:23 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    It’s a really a Hipster rally that Sharpton is speaking at. You will be fine there.

    This is beyond a hipster rally. I’m still thinking it over but erring on not going.


  68. 71 | July 19, 2013 1:33 pm

    @ Urban Infidel:

    No sense to put yourself at risk, is my personal opinion on it. So far the rallies like this , except for the ones in California, have been mostly peaceful, but Sharpton’s entire point of having the rally is incitement. No sense in being the target of Sharpton’s Two Minute Hate. You’d probably be safe as long as you didn’t let on to your true political beliefs, but why take the risk? It’d be too late to change your mind if the crowd turned ugly and decided to get some “Revenge for Trayvon” by beatin gup the few whites that are in their midst.


  69. Purre
    72 | July 19, 2013 4:43 pm

    Obama said today that “Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago.” So, if that is true and he was not just race hustling there, who did Obama assault 35 years ago? Whom did he tackle down and beat severely? After all, that is what Trayvon Martin did. So, either Obama is race hustler and liar, or he is violent criminal who just got away with a crime (though not his only time to do so).


  70. 73 | July 19, 2013 7:40 pm

    @ Purre:
    He meant the toxicology report…..


  71. randian
    74 | July 19, 2013 11:39 pm

    Didn’t Florida vote in Scott because they hated Crist? Why would they then vote in Crist just because he flipped to Democrat?

    I’m not even sure that the hate for Scott is all that real, rather than a mainstream media created construct.


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