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The magician’s performance has failed

by Speranza ( 95 Comments › )
Filed under Barack Obama, Democratic Party, Election 2008, Healthcare, History, Politics, Progressives at November 18th, 2013 - 7:00 am

I think it is interesting that Valerie Jarrett has said that Obama is a man who has been bored all his life.  The inertia of government is not want interests him, he wants to be above it all.

by Fouad Ajami

The current troubles of the Obama presidency can be read back into its beginnings. Rule by personal charisma has met its proper fate. The spell has been broken, and the magician stands exposed. We need no pollsters to tell us of the loss of faith in Mr. Obama’s policies—and, more significantly, in the man himself. Charisma is like that. Crowds come together and they project their needs onto an imagined redeemer. The redeemer leaves the crowd to its imagination: For as long as the charismatic moment lasts—a year, an era—the redeemer is above and beyond judgment. He glides through crises, he knits together groups of varied, often clashing, interests. Always there is that magical moment, and its beauty, as a reference point.

Mr. Obama gave voice to this sentiment in a speech on Nov. 6 in Dallas: “Sometimes I worry because everybody had such a fun experience in ’08, at least that’s how it seemed in retrospect. And, ‘yes we can,’ and the slogans and the posters, et cetera, sometimes I worry that people forget change in this country has always been hard.” It’s a pity we can’t stay in that moment, says the redeemer: The fault lies in the country itself—everywhere, that is, except in the magician’s performance.

Forgive the personal reference, but from the very beginning of Mr. Obama’s astonishing rise, I felt that I was witnessing something old and familiar. My advantage owed nothing to any mastery of American political history. I was guided by my immersion in the political history of the Arab world and of a life studying Third World societies.

In 2008, seeing the Obama crowds in Portland, Denver and St. Louis spurred memories of the spectacles that had attended the rise and fall of Arab political pretenders. I had lived through the era of the Egyptian leader Gamal Abdul Nasser. He had emerged from a military cabal to become a demigod, immune to judgment. His followers clung to him even as he led the Arabs to a catastrophic military defeat in the Six Day War of 1967. He issued a kind of apology for his performance. But his reign was never about policies and performance. It was about political magic.

[.......]
Five years on, we can still recall how the Obama coalition was formed. There were the African-Americans justifiably proud of one of their own. There were upper-class white professionals who were drawn to the candidate’s “cool.” There were Latinos swayed by the promise of immigration reform. The white working class in the Rust Belt was the last bloc to embrace Mr. Obama—he wasn’t one of them, but they put their reservations aside during an economic storm and voted for the redistributive state and its protections. There were no economic or cultural bonds among this coalition. There was the new leader, all things to all people.

A nemesis awaited the promise of this new presidency: Mr. Obama would turn out to be among the most polarizing of American leaders. No, it wasn’t his race, as Harry Reid would contend, that stirred up the opposition to him. It was his exalted views of himself, and his mission. The sharp lines were sharp between those who raised his banners and those who objected to his policies.

America holds presidential elections, we know. But Mr. Obama took his victory as a plebiscite on his reading of the American social contract. A president who constantly reminded his critics that he had won at the ballot box was bound to deepen the opposition of his critics.

A leader who set out to remake the health-care system in the country, a sixth of the national economy, on a razor-thin majority with no support whatsoever from the opposition party, misunderstood the nature of democratic politics. An election victory is the beginning of things, not the culmination. With Air Force One and the other prerogatives of office come the need for compromise, and for the disputations of democracy. A president who sought consensus would have never left his agenda on Capitol Hill in the hands of Harry Reid and Nancy Pelosi.

Mr. Obama has shown scant regard for precedent in American history. To him, and to the coterie around him, his presidency was a radical discontinuity in American politics. There is no evidence in the record that Mr. Obama read, with discernment and appreciation, of the ordeal and struggles of his predecessors. At best there was a willful reading of that history. Early on, he was Abraham Lincoln resurrected (the new president, who hailed from Illinois, took the oath of office on the Lincoln Bible). [.......]

In the oddest of twists, Mr. Obama claimed that his foreign policy was in the mold of Dwight Eisenhower’s . But Eisenhower knew war and peace, and the foreign world held him in high regard.

During his first campaign, Mr. Obama had paid tribute to Ronald Reagan as a “transformational” president and hinted that he aspired to a presidency of that kind. But the Reagan presidency was about America, and never about Ronald Reagan. Reagan was never a scold or a narcissist. He stood in awe of America, and of its capacity for renewal. There was forgiveness in Reagan, right alongside the belief in the things that mattered about America—free people charting their own path.

[.......]

There are no stars in the Obama cabinet today, men and women of independent stature and outlook. It was after a walk on the White House grounds with his chief of staff, Denis McDonough, that Mr. Obama called off the attacks on the Syrian regime that he had threatened. If he had taken that walk with Henry Kissinger or George Shultz, one of those skilled statesmen might have explained to him the consequences of so abject a retreat. But Mr. Obama needs no sage advice, he rules through political handlers.

Valerie Jarrett, the president’s most trusted, probably most powerful, aide, once said in admiration that Mr. Obama has been bored his whole life. The implication was that he is above things, a man alone, and anointed. Perhaps this moment—a presidency coming apart, the incompetent social engineering of an entire health-care system—will now claim Mr. Obama’s attention.

Read the rest – When the Obama magic died

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95 Responses to “The magician’s performance has failed”
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  1. eaglesoars
    1 | November 18, 2013 7:40 am

    Valerie Jarrett, the president’s most trusted, probably most powerful, aide, once said in admiration that Mr. Obama has been bored his whole life.

    For me, this was the most telling sentence in the entire article. It captures Obama’s essential nothingness. There is no there there. He is an avatar.


  2. 2 | November 18, 2013 7:47 am

    It’s a pity we can’t stay in that moment, says the redeemer: The fault lies in the country itself—everywhere, that is, except in the magician’s performance.

    That is how Obama sees it. We are not worthy of him. He is above the mundane work of governance. He has the vision, and if imperfect followers fail to implement it, that is not the fault of the visionary. Obama never takes personal responsibility for anything. Instead of being a leader (he is not a leader), he wants to be, I guess, the inspiratuon of others to do great works, but he has no intention of leading others to do anything. That’s too much like work, and he has never been industrious. Now that ObamaCare is foundering, he doesn’t have it in him to handle the mess. That should be someone else’s job. He doesn’t even really set policy. He speaks in plattitudes, and expects his underlings to formulate policy to match his rhetoric. Or not, as the case may be. I am in the chorus of people seeing dark days for the Obama Administration ahead. A true visionary might be able to overcome these defeats, especially if the media would play along, but Obama doesn’t really have the vision thing. His “vision” is simply a weak reflection of European Socialism, or perhaps even true Communism. Both of these models have failed elsewhere. There is no reason whatsoever to think that they are going to see success under the direction of Obama and his clown-car cabinet.


  3. 3 | November 18, 2013 8:04 am

    @ eaglesoars:

    He is bored of the daily grind. He’s never much been one for working, let alone working hard. He preferrs to be a figurehead, I guess, though surely not everything is just Jarrett in disguise. I still want to know what he was doing for the seven hours that our guys on the ground in Benghazi were getting pounded. That is a remarkable failure of leadership no matter what the truth, but if he really was playing cards with his “body man” Reggie Love while Jarrett was making the vitl calls, then really he should resign. He won’t, of course, but he should. It is not particularly remarkable that the Democrats have circled the wagons for him. After all, they did the same thing for Bill Clinton, though presumably Clinton never got any of our ambassadors killed. Benghazi wasn’t something like the Blackhawk Down incident that so rattled Clinton. There we sent in the troops necessary to get our people out. The political calculations came later. When the shooting was going on, at least Clinton had the good sense to stay out of the way. I think Obama has to have been the originator of the “stand down” order in Benghazi. Mid-level functionaries don’t make those kind of calls. Too, I’d bet that the people who carried that out demanded written orders. I certainly would have in their place. But Congress isn’t particularly concerned with gettin gthe truth out there, either. I see all of Issa’s hearings as simply obfuscation. It is a show for the crowds, but Issa has no intention of bringing down the Obama Administration.


  4. 4 | November 18, 2013 8:17 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    Which means Issa is part of the problem just like the Demo☭rats.


  5. eaglesoars
    5 | November 18, 2013 8:18 am

    Iron Fist wrote:

    That is a remarkable failure of leadership

    It is a failure of humanity and a profound lesson in cowardice.

    He surrounds himself with mediocre sycophants because he cannot bear to be outshone.

    He has blood on his hands and it empowers him. “I’m really good at killing people.”

    He doesn’t need a confessor.

    He needs an exorcist.


  6. eaglesoars
    6 | November 18, 2013 8:32 am

    Whoa!! If you haven’t seen the Hail Mary pass that led Auburn to defeat Georgia, you can watch it here.


  7. 7 | November 18, 2013 8:35 am

    @ eaglesoars:

    And we’ve got three more years of him no matter what happens in the election next year. I am already nervous abou t that. We can win next year, but we are goin gto have to fight for it. It seems to me like the GOP Establishment is ore concerned about fighting the Tea Party than they are fighting the Deocrats. That could easily snatch defeat from the jaws of victory. I am not convinced that the GOP Mandarins want to win the majority in the Senate. They seem more concened with pork and perks than anything else.


  8. eaglesoars
    8 | November 18, 2013 8:48 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    I agree -- they care more about defeating the Tea Party than the Dems. They DO want to win the Senate, but not if it means seating Tea Party people.

    I think it’s not even revulsion toward the Tea Party. I think it’s abject terror of the media. The msm has done everything it can to destroy the brand and in great part succeeded. THAT’S what the establishment GOP is running from. Which just goes to show that they have NO media savy. It would be so easy to turn around but they simply don’t know how. Bravery is not part of the vernacular unless you’re Ted Cruz.


  9. Speranza
    9 | November 18, 2013 8:51 am

    eaglesoars wrote:

    Valerie Jarrett, the president’s most trusted, probably most powerful, aide, once said in admiration that Mr. Obama has been bored his whole life.

    For me, this was the most telling sentence in the entire article. It captures Obama’s essential nothingness. There is no there there. He is an avatar.

    Fouad Ajami is one of the best writers concerning the Middle East. This is the first time I have seen a column of his dealing with American domestic politics and he has shown himself to be very perceptive.


  10. Speranza
    10 | November 18, 2013 8:53 am

    Iron Fist wrote:

    We are not worthy of him.

    If you believe in American exceptionalism we are not worthy of him as he is really not worthy of us.


  11. Speranza
    11 | November 18, 2013 8:55 am

    @ eaglesoars:
    I hate to disagree with you but in my opinion right now the tea party 2013 is far different then the tea party 2009. If the tea party was so concerned with winning they might have pushed better candidates for the Senate in Delaware, Nevada, Colorado and a few other state.


  12. Speranza
    12 | November 18, 2013 8:57 am

    Macker wrote:

    @ Iron Fist:
    Which means Issa is part of the problem just like the Demo☭rats.

    Let’s purge Darrell Issa then.


  13. eaglesoars
    13 | November 18, 2013 8:58 am

    Speranza wrote:

    he has shown himself to be very perceptive.

    Yep. I liked the Nassar analogy. I wish he had pointed out that many Egyptians still think they won. That is very much in line with the delusion that Obamcare is ‘fixable’


  14. 14 | November 18, 2013 9:00 am

    eaglesoars wrote:

    I think it’s not even revulsion toward the Tea Party. I think it’s abject terror of the media.

    That is possible, but they should be ale to flip that. Everybody knows the media is biased. I don’t think but maybe 30% of the people consider it to be “unbiased”, and that is the hard-core Left who want to hear nonstop propaganda from the media. Those are votes we’re never going to win, so we shouldn’t waste our time trying. What we areally lack are leaders. Boehner and McConnell are not leaders. They don’t seem to know how to do much of anything. We have potential leaders in Cruz, Paul, and Lee, and of course, governors like Scott Walker, Suzanna Martinez, and Nikkin Haley. But those peopl ehave yet to really take the stage on a national level. Time will tell if we can pull out of this. If the Party Mandarins will accept the Tea Party, we can be a majority Party again. If they can’t, and they go about trying to sabatoge the Tea Party, they could even lose the House again.


  15. 15 | November 18, 2013 9:02 am

    @ Speranza:

    Issa is traitor to the Revolution. Citizen Robespierre demands his head!
    ////


  16. eaglesoars
    16 | November 18, 2013 9:02 am

    Speranza wrote:

    @ eaglesoars:
    I hate to disagree with you but in my opinion right now the tea party 2013 is far different then the tea party 2009. If the tea party was so concerned with winning they might have pushed better candidates for the Senate in Delaware, Nevada, Colorado and a few other state.

    Oh I don’t think we disagree. That debacle was painful to watch and it has certainly marginalized them

    But contrast and compare. For example: Sheila Jackson Lee, who thinks we put men on Mars.


  17. 17 | November 18, 2013 9:03 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    You saw Scot Walker’s comments that the 2016 nominee should be a Governor? I totally agree with him and think this is his way of announcing his run.


  18. 18 | November 18, 2013 9:03 am

    @ eaglesoars:

    But contrast and compare. For example: Sheila Jackson Lee, who thinks we put men on Mars.

    What about that Democrat who thinks Guam will tip over?


  19. eaglesoars
    19 | November 18, 2013 9:05 am

    Iron Fist wrote:

    We have potential leaders in Cruz, Paul, and Lee, and of course, governors like Scott Walker, Suzanna Martinez, and Nikkin Haley

    And Jindal and, I would submit, Jan Brewer

    I would LOVE to see Jindal go after Common Core and Arne Duncan’s snidely racist remark that ‘white surburban moms don’t like it because it shows their kids aren’t brilliant”.


  20. eaglesoars
    20 | November 18, 2013 9:08 am

    Goldwaterite wrote:

    @ eaglesoars:
    But contrast and compare. For example: Sheila Jackson Lee, who thinks we put men on Mars.
    What about that Democrat who thinks Guam will tip over?

    Oh yeah, that Johnson guy. Forgot about him.

    Gotta get my day started. Later.

    Nice thread Speranza, thanks.


  21. 21 | November 18, 2013 9:08 am

    @ eaglesoars:

    The 2016 nominee should be a Governor. Scott Walker’s comments in that regard was him throwing his hat into the ring.


  22. coldwarrior
    22 | November 18, 2013 9:13 am

    Speranza wrote:

    @ eaglesoars:
    I hate to disagree with you but in my opinion right now the tea party 2013 is far different then the tea party 2009. If the tea party was so concerned with winning they might have pushed better candidates for the Senate in Delaware, Nevada, Colorado and a few other state.

    maybe run guys like these instead

    pretty good list. yeah some losers got in the races, but by a long shot this list beats anything the gop has put in dc in a generation

    see ya in 2014!


  23. 23 | November 18, 2013 9:16 am

    @ coldwarrior:

    There are alot of Charlatans who call themselves Tea party. Then the media plays them up and sadly many Republican voters end up supporting these Charlatans.


  24. 24 | November 18, 2013 9:17 am

    @ Goldwaterite:

    I agree, and I am glad to see it. At this time, Walker is my favorite for the nomination. He, like Christie, has proven he has what it takes to get elected in a Blue State, and he has done it without the moral compromises that Christie has. I culd see Walker with Martinez as VP being a formidible force. Martinez has indicated that she wouldn’t want to be the top spot on a ticket, but would consider the VP slot. It is way early for predictions, but right now that is the way I am leaning. I hope Walker doesn’t step on his dick the way Rick Perry did in 2012. Perry is a good man, I think, and would have been a good President, but he didn’t run well. Much of the same thing that can be said of Rudy Guiliani or even Fred Thompson. I do agree with Walker that we need a governor, not a Senator or party aparatchik. If Hillary is the nominee, we would posibly be able to paint our team as outsiders (nobody much likes Washington these days) against a consumate insider. That might help us in the polls.


  25. coldwarrior
    25 | November 18, 2013 9:18 am

    Goldwaterite wrote:

    @ coldwarrior:
    There are alot of Charlatans who call themselves Tea party. Then the media plays them up and sadly many Republican voters end up supporting these Charlatans.

    there’s a lot of very liberal republicans who should be democrats to.

    nothing is 100%. i sure dont expect it to be. i’m happy with 75-80%


  26. coldwarrior
    26 | November 18, 2013 9:19 am

    ‘night yinz…midnight shift becons


  27. 27 | November 18, 2013 9:20 am

    @ coldwarrior:

    I agree. Frankly, though, you can’t expect to win every race. If you win more than you lose you are doing good. Look at Sarah Palin’s record against, say, Karl Rove’s. Palin does a much better job of picking people. If we’d gone with Steelman in Missouri instead of Akin, we’d have probly picked up that Seat. Akin wasn’t a Tea Party candidate, though the media has done its damnedest to try and paint him as a Tea Party candidate.


  28. 28 | November 18, 2013 9:23 am

    @ coldwarrior:

    These Charlatans with the aid of the media have done damage to the Tea Party brand. It’s why I don’t get all excited when someone is declared a “Tea Party favorite.” I wish people on the Right would be more discerning and stop following anyone blindly who calls themselves “Tea Party.”


  29. 29 | November 18, 2013 9:24 am

    @ coldwarrior:

    Night?

    :lol:

    More like Morning!


  30. 30 | November 18, 2013 9:25 am

    coldwarrior wrote:

    there’s a lot of very liberal republicans who should be democrats to.

    And notice that there really aren’t any conservative Democrats, at least at the National level. The Democrats have been purging their ranks ever since Obama got elected. Even before that, really, though in 2006 they ran a bunch of “conservative” Democrats, none of them were really very conservative, they just played the Part, and the GOP was spending like drunken Democrats. The GOP in 2006 was out of control, but I don’t know that voting in Democrats was the solution. Look who those “conservative” Democrats voted into the Speakership.


  31. Speranza
    31 | November 18, 2013 9:25 am

    Goldwaterite wrote:

    @ coldwarrior:
    These Charlatans with the aid of the media have done damage to the Tea Party brand. It’s why I don’t get all excited when someone is declared a “Tea Party favorite.” I wish people on the Right would be more discerning and stop following anyone blindly who calls themselves “Tea Party.”

    The Tea Party was never meant to be an adjunct of the Republican Party.


  32. Speranza
    32 | November 18, 2013 9:27 am

    coldwarrior wrote:

    there’s a lot of very liberal republicans who should be democrats to.

    nothing is 100%. i sure dont expect it to be. i’m happy with 75-80%

    Getting rid of people is not a good way to win elections. By liberal do you mean anyone to the Left of Rick Santorum?


  33. 33 | November 18, 2013 9:28 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    Karl Rove and Palin are perfect illustrations of what is wrong with the GOP. Rove is a scam artist who took 300 million from people and is an agent of the Bush family. Palin acts like she’s the 2nd coming of Robespierre and demands all must obey her or they must be purged. She’s a 1/2 term quitter who left her job.

    Rove and Palin are losers.


  34. Speranza
    34 | November 18, 2013 9:29 am

    coldwarrior wrote:

    maybe run guys like these instead

    pretty good list. yeah some losers got in the races, but by a long shot this list beats anything the gop has put in dc in a generation

    see ya in 2014!

    All these guys who won who were supported by “Tea party” are you saying that they would not have won otherwise and what is your basis for that?
    That stupid woman in Nevada was a Godsend to Harry Reid.


  35. 35 | November 18, 2013 9:29 am

    @ Speranza:

    Rick Santorum is a Christian Socialist. His economic policies are as Left as Obama. The only difference is Santorum does it in the name of the “family” not social justice.


  36. Speranza
    36 | November 18, 2013 9:32 am

    Goldwaterite wrote:

    @ Speranza:
    Rick Santorum is a Christian Socialist. His economic policies are as Left as Obama. The only difference is Santorum does it in the name of the “family” not social justice.

    I saw him on Huckabee last night and I wanted to punch him right in the face. I would laugh myself silly if he ever got arrested soliciting homosexual relations in a bus station rest room. Sanctimonious prig.


  37. 37 | November 18, 2013 9:32 am

    Speranza wrote:

    That stupid woman in Nevada was a Godsend to Harry Reid.

    Theere’s only been one time in Aerican history that a Senate Majority Leader was removed from office. They have the power of incumbancy, and that is a long way towards getting re-elected in and of itself. It is unlikely that any candidate would have unseated Harry Reid. History just indicates this.


  38. 38 | November 18, 2013 9:32 am

    eaglesoars wrote:

    But contrast and compare. For example: Sheila Jackson Lee, who thinks we put men on Mars.

    She must have really loved OJ Simpson in Capricorn One!


  39. 39 | November 18, 2013 9:32 am

    @ Speranza:

    That stupid woman in Nevada was a Godsend to Harry Reid.

    Sharron Angle was a paid Harry Reid operative. She’s one of those Charlatans I am talking about.


  40. 40 | November 18, 2013 9:34 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    It is unlikely that any candidate would have unseated Harry Reid. History just indicates this.

    Polling data showed Lowden or Tarkanian would have wiped the floor with Reid. That is why Reid financed and paid for Sharron Angle’s primary run. She declared herself with the help of the media the Tea Party favorite and the GOP voters fell for this.


  41. 41 | November 18, 2013 9:34 am

    @ Speranza:

    I would not be shock if Santorum is Gay on the down low. That is why he’s obsessed with homosexuality.


  42. Speranza
    42 | November 18, 2013 9:37 am

    Goldwaterite wrote:

    @ Speranza:
    I would not be shock if Santorum is Gay on the down low. That is why he’s obsessed with homosexuality.

    I wish he would just go away and that Fox would stop promoting these washed up right wingers.


  43. 43 | November 18, 2013 9:37 am

    ObamaCare is behaving just like I expected it to in Washington State:

    Even as the federal health-insurance exchange faces unrelenting criticism, Washington state continues to report steady progress enrolling residents in health-care coverage through its Washington Healthplanfinder insurance exchange.

    New data released Wednesday by the Washington Health Benefit Exchange show that more than 77,000 state residents have enrolled in coverage through Healthplanfinder between Oct. 1 and Nov. 7 — the first five weeks of open enrollment for coverage in 2014.

    That figure includes 9,230 residents who enrolled in “qualified health plans” being sold through the exchange. A total of 68,532 used Healthplanfinder to enroll in Medicaid, which has been expanded to cover more low-income adults.

    The latest figures for Washington state are higher than those included in a much-anticipated report, released earlier in the day Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), that contains the first national enrollment data released by the Obama administration.


    The HHS data showed that 7,091 Washington residents had enrolled in private plans and 48,324 in Medicaid
    through Healthplanfinder from Oct. 1 to Oct. 31. Those figures put Washington third among all 50 states in the number of residents who have enrolled in private health plans through the online marketplace. Only California and New York reported higher enrollment figures.

    It is mostly Medicad people that are going to sign on to ObamaCare. That means that we won’t have the income that they were counting on to subsidize this monster. Which means that if we don’t get rid of it, in a few years we will be bailing it out. Maybe sooner than that. Yesterday on one of the news shows, someone pointed out that ObamaCare was poised to blow a big hole in the budget. Which is a laugh. We don’t do budgets anymore.


  44. 44 | November 18, 2013 9:39 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    This was the plan all along. This was designed to fail to set up Single Payer.


  45. 45 | November 18, 2013 9:41 am

    @ Speranza:

    Santorum is one of the most vile politicians ever. He’s a nasty and evil man.


  46. 46 | November 18, 2013 9:43 am

    I like this, and it is so true. The police don’t exist to protect you, and in reality they simply can’t be everywhere. It is up to you to be able todefend yourself, wich is something that they ought to teach in schools, but they don’t. They are too busy trying to feminize the boys to deal with tough issues like self-defense.


  47. 47 | November 18, 2013 9:45 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    That poster says the truth.


  48. 48 | November 18, 2013 9:46 am

    @ Goldwaterite:

    They didn’t expect it to fail this completely this soon. There really is no way that they’ll be able to get their 7 million people signed up for ObamaCare by March. It isn’t just the web site. The plans they let you choose from are shit, for the most part. I will never need maternity coverage, and it is frankly insane to think that I do. None of these plans are as good as what I have through my employer, and they are all more expensive. The Bronze Plan has a $12K deductible, and is still more a month than I pay for my insurance. How is a $12K deductible “affordable”?


  49. 49 | November 18, 2013 9:51 am

    @ Goldwaterite:

    Yep. I have never been able to get the simple facts of life across to women. Without a weapon and training, thre’s not a whole lot they can do about a man that assaults them. Phyical size and strength are just too slanted in the direction against them. It is possible with training in the martial arts that a woman can become a physical “equal” of the man, but that takes years of practice, and alittle luck on her part. When I took Aikido when I was a kid the instructor told us about a student of his that was asssaulted by two or three men in Atlanta. She tore the first one’s arm out of its socket, and he scared the others away with his screaming and carrying on. It is possible for a woman to do these things, but she starts at a disadvantage. I’ve only known one or two women that had the killer instinct that is really very necessary for you to defend yourself with martial arts. The real weapon is the mind.


  50. 50 | November 18, 2013 9:54 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    That poster should be in ads everywhere.


  51. Speranza
    51 | November 18, 2013 9:57 am

    Goldwaterite wrote:

    @ Speranza:
    Santorum is one of the most vile politicians ever. He’s a nasty and evil man.

    Mr. 18% (loser).


  52. 52 | November 18, 2013 9:59 am

    The joys of ObamaCare from a Leftists’s poin of view:

    For every business futurist who hails the coming of the independent contracting economy, the future that is The Brand of You, there are thousands of us out here actually building The Brand of You. It ain’t an easy hustle. If you want to get an idea of our monthly and yearly incomes, imagine a sine wave drawn by a drunken sailor. Last year my wife and I, we made out all right. This year’s kinda lean. Which year did the exchange want? Unclear.

    I went to a friend and colleague—let’s call him Peter—for advice. He also had his individual medical policy cancelled because of Obamacare. “I’m stuck on the same question—income,” he told me. Peter does a little writing, a little farming, a little this and that to keep the ship afloat. “I got through to the exchange, and the woman there told me to just estimate what my income would be this year.” In other words: Make it up. If he overestimated, he’d be screwing himself out of a subsidy, Peter said. If he underestimated, he’d be hit with a big fat bill. He wasn’t sure he wouldn’t also be accused of fraud. So he called his accountant, who’s also a lawyer.

    That only got him so far. At a certain point in the conversation, the accountant/lawyer had to get off the phone. “I have to stop answering your questions,” he told Peter. “I can’t ethically advise you, because honestly I don’t know the right thing to do. Nobody does. There are no answers. Right now it’s a complete clusterfuck.”

    This problem isn’t related to the web site. It is endemic to ObamaCare itself. I like the way the “Navigator” told him to just make up his income statement. Yeah, because the Feds never go after anybody who commits fraud. Lovely.


  53. 53 | November 18, 2013 10:04 am

    @ Goldwaterite:

    yeah, but even the NRA seems to tread very lightly when it comes to emphasizing self-defense. It is there, of course, but understated. They keep wanting to suggest a “sporting purpose” to guns, when in fact the Constitution doesn’t say anything about hunting, or punching paper for that matter (if figure skating can be a sport, why not target shooting? For recreational amusement, just abou t nothign bears an H&K MP5). Self-defense is all about taking responsibility for your own safety, which is exactly what this poster depicts.


  54. 54 | November 18, 2013 10:05 am

    @ Speranza:

    He’s a Leftist Nanny State asshole.


  55. Guggi
    55 | November 18, 2013 10:15 am

    There is a much more dangerous trend: more and more people lose any interest in politics and withdraw into private life. They feel betrayed but don’t become angy but become disillusioned and disinterested into politics. If this becomes mainstream in a society democratic principles are in deep danger and totalitarism ets a chance.


  56. taxfreekiller
    56 | November 18, 2013 10:16 am

    Live as a lie.
    Lie to live.
    A lie based life.
    Lie to power.
    Power for life.
    Base of lies.
    To be a lie.

    I Obama.


  57. Guggi
    57 | November 18, 2013 10:19 am

    taxfreekiller wrote:

    Live as a lie.
    Lie to live.
    A lie based life.
    Lie to power.
    Power for life.
    Base of lies.
    To be a lie.
    I Obama.

    This would be Nietzsche :-P


  58. RIX
    58 | November 18, 2013 10:20 am

    Good morning. Tremendous devestation in Southern & Central Illinois from yesterday’s storm.
    Homes are flattened & some fatalities.
    Now my cynical comment, ho concerned will Obama be? He claims Illinois as his home state, but this is not like Katrina, the victims are overwhelingly White,so will he care?
    I did say cynical.


  59. 59 | November 18, 2013 10:20 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    I am in that exact same boat. 2011 was great, 2012 was okay, 2013 sucks. My income is wildly variable.

    Not that I want to enroll in any of that crap anyway.


  60. taxfreekiller
    60 | November 18, 2013 10:20 am

    Obama now goes on to an even larger lie to control U.S..

    The CO2 kills lie, the Hockey Stick fraud, the creeks will back fill with sea water lie, the live in the dark with no electricity lie, ride a mule to work lie.

    At the same time concurrently the amnesty lie.

    Will lies win?

    Only if the RINO’s rescue him.


  61. 61 | November 18, 2013 10:23 am

    JFK: LIFETIME NRA MEMBER, SECOND AMENDMENT DEFENDER

    Fun fact: he’s one of only eight presidents to have been lifetime NRA members, and the only Democrat….I did not know that.


  62. Guggi
    62 | November 18, 2013 10:24 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    After reading about “futire income” this was the first question I asked here: how can one estimate the income for the coming year without a crystal ball ?


  63. 63 | November 18, 2013 10:27 am

    @ RIX:

    Man, I was thinking about you over the weekend, no damage, I trust? We had a tremendous about of rain yesterday and they’re saying that spared us from the damaging weather.


  64. taxfreekiller
    64 | November 18, 2013 10:28 am

    Scott Walker is an amnesty guy, so he has self eliminated himself with one choice.


  65. taxfreekiller
    65 | November 18, 2013 10:31 am

    Most needed, a long term amnesty from RINO’s.


  66. 66 | November 18, 2013 10:31 am

    @ Guggi:

    Already only about half of the eligible adults actually vote. I don’t necessarily think that is a bad thing. If you can’t trouble yourself to learn the issues or the candidates, you shouldn’t go vote just because it is your “civic duty”. An informed electorate is the key to maintaining the Republic. Unfortunately, more people would rather watch the Superbowl any given year than will vote in the Presidential elections. The real key to being a breakout success is to find a way to get a substantive portion of the non-voting public to come out and pull the lever for you. The Democrats attempt at this is sheer bribery: vote for us and we’ll give you goodies. The Republicans, OTOH, don’t really have a policy to entice these voters. ObamaCare may change that. OamaCare affects everybody. I worry about what it is going to do for my tattoo artist. He does well, but he owns his own shop. He has one or two employees (another tattoo artist and maybe his wife; she’s there I just don’t know if she’s on the payroll). The recession hit him hard, but he’s weathered the storm, and now ObamaCare is coming after him. A thousand dollars a month is steep, I don’t care who you are.


  67. 67 | November 18, 2013 10:32 am

    MacDuff wrote:

    JFK: LIFETIME NRA MEMBER, SECOND AMENDMENT DEFENDER
    Fun fact: he’s one of only eight presidents to have been lifetime NRA members, and the only Democrat….I did not know that.

    If JFK were alive today, he would be a far right Conservative Republican.


  68. 68 | November 18, 2013 10:38 am

    @ Guggi:

    Yeah, I can estimate what I and my wife will make, but that is contingent on her staying in her position, and she’s in a contract position, so that is never 100% guaranteed to last. It looks like it is. I’d be unpleasantly surprised if they let her go, but it isn’t a permanent position, and she has no benefits. I am in about as solid a work as you can have in the Obama Economy. I can have a real close estimate of what I will make, but most of the people in the individual markets aren’t like me. They are like Mike C. and the guy in the article. They won’t know how much they are going to make this year until it is over, and that has no bearing whatsoever on what they’ll make next year.


  69. 69 | November 18, 2013 10:38 am

    doriangrey wrote:

    If JFK were alive today, he would be a far right Conservative Republican.

    By any standard imaginable, he absolutely would be.


  70. RIX
    70 | November 18, 2013 10:40 am

    MacDuff wrote:

    @ RIX:

    Man, I was thinking about you over the weekend, no damage, I trust? We had a tremendous about of rain yesterday and they’re saying that spared us from the damaging weather.

    Good morning Mac. No , we got lucky, the early reports had the storm heading directly toward us, then it veered East.
    We got heavy winds & rains, but no real damage.
    I’m glad to hear that you & yours are ok.


  71. 71 | November 18, 2013 10:41 am

    @ MacDuff:

    That’s interesting. I did not know that. Of course, it has only been since the late ’70s that the NRA really became something of a political force. They were a national gun club when the 1934 NFA was passed, and I don’t think that they were organized to fight the 1968 GCA either. They certainly are a big dog on the Hill now, especially after what we’ve seen in Colorado with the recall elections. I suspect that Colorado will be replacing most o their Democrats in the Legislature next year. That’ll be nice. I will be watching those races intently to see what happens there.


  72. Speranza
    72 | November 18, 2013 10:45 am

    MacDuff wrote:

    doriangrey wrote:
    If JFK were alive today, he would be a far right Conservative Republican.

    By any standard imaginable, he absolutely would be.

    That is assuming that he would not have made the political and strategic decision to move to the Left that his two younger brothers did. A big assumption!


  73. Guggi
    73 | November 18, 2013 10:45 am

    @ doriangrey:

    Can you imagine O. would do this ?

    In the summer of 1963, a pregnant Jacqueline Kennedy was at the Kennedy family compound in Massachusetts. Air Force personnel became concerned that if Mrs. Kennedy were to deliver the child at the Otis Air Force Base hospital, that the maternity ward furniture would be inferior for the newborn of the President and First Lady. The Air Force then spent $5,000.00 of taxpayer money at Jordan Marsh & Company to purchase new furniture, and allowed media photographs of an Air Force captain proudly standing next to the purchase. After the photos made their way into the Washington Post, an irate President Kennedy telephoned McHugh and ordered him to have the furniture returned. Kennedy’s curse-laden phone call with McHugh are now public.


  74. 74 | November 18, 2013 10:49 am

    @ MacDuff:

    As i have said, JFK was a man of the Right, not Left.


  75. 75 | November 18, 2013 10:52 am

    @ Speranza:
    You see that with Steve Cohen her in Tennessee. When he was in the State Legislature Cohen was a conservative Democrat. He was one of the legislators who helped shepherd our concealed carry law through the Legislature. Now, he is a Left-wing shill, doctrinarially no different than Obama. That wins his district (essentially metropolitan Memphis), which in any other district in the State he’d find himself out of office fairly quickly. JFK very well might have moved Left had he lived. An interesting thing to wonder about is would JFK have escalated Vietnam if he’d lived. I don’t think there is any way to know for certain. But JFK was on the United States’ side of the Cold War, which is not something that can be said of Ted (I have no idea about RFK).


  76. 76 | November 18, 2013 10:55 am

    @ Guggi:

    Obama spent, what was it, $100 million dollars to take hids family on an African safari this year. All of that was out of the taxpayers’ coffers. Obama is pilliaging the treasury, and no one has the guts to call him on it. It is difficult to imagine Obama turning down any perk of the office he can swindle out of the taxpayers.


  77. lobo91
    77 | November 18, 2013 10:57 am

    @ Iron Fist:

    Someone should have corrected the model’s grip.


  78. 78 | November 18, 2013 11:03 am

    @ lobo91:

    Yeah, they mentioned that on the Twiter thread. I didn’t notice it myself, but I am not an expert with firearms. That’s really a minor thing, though. Most people don’t know enough to notice that, even if they are familiar with firearms. I doubt that there was anybody involved with the photoshoot that would have been able to correct her. Liking guns isn’t the same thing as being able to instructe people on their use.


  79. lobo91
    79 | November 18, 2013 11:07 am

    Obama: “There’s A Lot Left On My To-Do List”…

    I think that’s a threat…


  80. 80 | November 18, 2013 11:09 am

    And the hits just keep coming.


  81. RIX
    81 | November 18, 2013 11:11 am

    @ Iron Fist:
    RFK was one of the chief architects of the Viet Nam War.
    He supported it until it became inconvenient.
    Gene McCarthy a then Dem Senator from MN ran as a “Peace” candidate. RFK then jumped in as more anti war than him. It was like he had nothing to do the the original plolicy.


  82. 82 | November 18, 2013 11:18 am

    @ RIX:

    Sounds like a Democrat during the Iraq War. They mostly voted for the war, and then immediately stabbed the troops in the back to please their hard-Left constituencies. The Democrats prolonged the war for years by encouraging al Qaeda to continue fighing. The Press let them get away with it. So did the Republicans. Not one person asked if Dick Durbin (D-al Qaeda) had even a shread of decency when he was on the floor of the Senate reading al Qaeda propaganda into the Congressional record. I guess it wouldn’t have been colliegial to take notice of the fact that he was giving material aid and comfort to the enemy in a time of war.


  83. RIX
    83 | November 18, 2013 11:32 am

    Iron Fist wrote:

    @ RIX:

    Sounds like a Democrat during the Iraq War. They mostly voted for the war, and then immediately stabbed the troops in the back to please their hard-Left constituencies. The Democrats prolonged the war for years by encouraging al Qaeda to continue fighing. The Press let them get away with it. So did the Republicans. Not one person asked if Dick Durbin (D-al Qaeda) had even a shread of decency when he was on the floor of the Senate reading al Qaeda propaganda into the Congressional record. I guess it wouldn’t have been colliegial to take notice of the fact that he was giving material aid and comfort to the enemy in a time of war.

    During Viet Nam the troops were smeared by the MSM, the Democrats, University profs and activists as “Criminals. Baby Killers, Stupid & Dupes.”
    Our troops now are given a grudging respect by the Dems for political reasons, but Durbin let the mask slip.


  84. 84 | November 18, 2013 11:39 am

    @ RIX:

    Yeah, Durbin might as well have had a paid position with al Qaeda in Iraq. I can hardly believe he stays in office. Do the people of Illinois really want him as their representative? It seems so. He is, I think, up for re-election next year, but he’ll win it in a walk. That is just unreal to me. It’d be like Tokyo Rose running on the Democrat ticket, and the Democrats seem just fine with that.


  85. RIX
    85 | November 18, 2013 12:11 pm

    Iron Fist wrote:

    @ RIX:

    Yeah, Durbin might as well have had a paid position with al Qaeda in Iraq. I can hardly believe he stays in office. Do the people of Illinois really want him as their representative? It seems so. He is, I think, up for re-election next year, but he’ll win it in a walk. That is just unreal to me. It’d be like Tokyo Rose running on the Democrat ticket, and the Democrats seem just fine with that.

    Durbin is a union lackey in Illinois. He is flush with their money.


  86. 86 | November 18, 2013 12:18 pm

    Iron Fist wrote:

    Not one person asked if Dick Durbin (D-al Qaeda) had even a shread of decency

    Of course not, everyone knew he didn’t.


  87. eaglesoars
    87 | November 18, 2013 1:36 pm

    Remember last week when Obama gave that unintentionallly hilarious speech? He said something like “I’ve been accused of a lot of things, but I’m not so stupid to say ACA was going to be great if I knew about the problems”.

    Well, he just had an online chat with his ‘bots trying to convince them Obamacare is going to be GREEEAAATT!!

    No, he’s not stupid. He just thinks WE are


  88. eaglesoars
    88 | November 18, 2013 1:54 pm

    Ok I just finished my Christmas shopping. HA!


  89. coldwarrior
    89 | November 18, 2013 2:23 pm

    Speranza wrote:

    All these guys who won who were supported by “Tea party” are you saying that they would not have won otherwise and what is your basis for that?
    That stupid woman in Nevada was a Godsend to Harry Reid.

    and you inferred that from what in my statement how?

    look at the list, these people all ran publicly under the banner of more liberty and less tax/debt. the fact that every republican isnt on that list tells me everything i need to know about the so called ‘conservative’ party known as the gop.

    as for the error in nv and mo, ok, and de, so what. the gop still doesn’t get the senate. nothing is perfect.


  90. 90 | November 18, 2013 2:24 pm

    @ eaglesoars:

    I have all of mine done except for my wife. We’re going to see what we have available funds-wise in the next couple of weeks. I know what I’d like to get her, but we siply can’t afford that. So I am down to lesser things. We’ll see. We’re going to get another cat tree for the cats.


  91. coldwarrior
    91 | November 18, 2013 2:24 pm

    Goldwaterite wrote:

    @ coldwarrior:
    Night?

    More like Morning!

    meh…time is overrated and relative. i worked the last two nights.


  92. 92 | November 18, 2013 2:28 pm

    @ coldwarrior:
    You also have to remember the Missouri wasn’t the Tea Party candidate. If we’d ran Steelman, we’d have likely won that one, but the Party Mandarins cared more about defeating Sarah Palin than they did winning the Seat. The same was really true of Delaware as well. Karl Rove basically cut commercials to run against Christine O’Donnell. Now, after action analysis indicated that neither her nor Castle would have won, so that was a race that was gone, anyway (and little surprise there; it was Biden’s seat, after all), so it was more instructive to view how the Establishment would rather lose a race than have a Tea Party person win it.


  93. coldwarrior
    93 | November 18, 2013 2:33 pm

    @ Iron Fist:

    my congresscritter here was called a tea party radical by the socialist who took over from murtha. the socialist even went as far as making tea cups with rothfus’ face on them, so, rothfus had even more made and handed them out at all the rallies.

    the tea party won big. and lets not mention mike kelly from just north of here, took the seat away from the dems, ran as tea party. it goes on and on.

    more freedom, less debt/ taxes (slavery) works almost every time its tried.


  94. Speranza
    94 | November 18, 2013 3:34 pm

    For the last time -- the Republican “establishment” candidate for the Missouri Senate seat held by Claire McCaskill was John Brunner (not Todd Akin). Brunner was a successful business man who probably would have won decisively over McCaskill. Akin won the primary with 34% of the vote.


  95. 95 | November 18, 2013 3:37 pm

    @ Speranza:

    And the Tea Party candidate was Sarah Steelman, not Akin, so kindly cut out inferring that Akin was a Tea Party candidate.


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