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Why Charles Dickens still endures

by Speranza ( 80 Comments › )
Filed under Uncategorized at January 2nd, 2014 - 5:00 pm

Although over two weeks old, I found this wonderful article to be quite interesting and psychologically perceptive. One of my favorite moments during my many trips to London was discovering a cafe “The Charles Dickens”  next to the Bow Street Royal Opera House which Dickens used to have his coffee at.

by John Gray

As Christmas approaches, so Charles Dickens begins to seep once again into TV and theatre schedules. I have my own theory about the reason for his cultural longevity. Listen to this:

“There was a man who, though not more than thirty, had seen the world in divers irreconcilable capacities – had been an officer in a South American regiment among other odd things – but had not achieved much in any way of life, and was in debt, and in hiding. He occupied chambers of the dreariest nature in Lyons Inn; his name, however, was not up on the door, or door-post, but in lieu of it stood the name of a friend who had died in the chambers, and had given him the furniture. The story arose out of the furniture… ”

The story Dickens goes on to tell recounts how the failed adventurer finds a heap of old furniture in the cellar of his lodgings. Finding his rooms bare and cheerless, he borrows a writing-table, then a bookcase, then a couch and a rug, and soon has all of the furniture in his chambers. Some years later there is a knock on his door. A tall, red-nosed shabby-genteel man in a threadbare black coat enters the room and, pointing to each item of furniture, mutters: “Mine”.

The adventurer offers his visitor a drink, which the visitor gladly accepts. An hour later the visitor leaves, having consumed an entire decanter of gin, falling twice as he stumbles down the stairs. “Whether he was a ghost,” Dickens writes, “or a spectral illusion of conscience, or a drunken man who had no business there, or the drunken rightful owner of the furniture, with a transitory gleam of memory; whether he got safe home, or had no home to get to; whether he died of liquor on the way, or lived in liquor ever afterwards; he was heard of no more”.

The tale of the failed adventurer and the borrowed furniture comes from one of Dickens’s best and least-read books, The Uncommercial Traveller. A series of essays he began in 1860 not long after he had written A Tale of Two Cities and just before he started work on Great Expectations, these short, vivid non-fiction pieces were written at a time when he cast himself as above all a wanderer. “I am both a town traveller and a country traveller,” he wrote, “and am always on the road. Figuratively speaking, I travel for the great House of Human Interest Brothers, and have a rather large collection in the fancy goods way.” The stories he tells are Dickens’s fancy goods, picked up while he tramped the streets.

[.......]

As an observer of the human scene Dickens wasn’t the cosy sentimentalist to whom we were introduced at school, any more than he was just an angry protestor against Victorian injustice. As he saw it, if I read him right, human life was fickle, erratic and inherently unruly. There was no prospect of remoulding things according to some more exalted plan. Yet this wasn’t for Dickens an altogether melancholy thought, for he had a powerful sense of excitement when he contemplated the intractable human world.

Dickens didn’t seem to share the idea, common among reformers in his day and our own, that there is a more reasonable and better-natured human species hidden away somewhere inside us, waiting to be let out. Listen to his description of the laundrywoman of the chambers where the failed adventurer lodged: “The veritable shining-red-faced shameless laundress… in figure, colour, texture and smell, like the old damp family umbrella: the tip-top complicated abomination of stockings, spirits, bonnet, limpness, looseness and larceny.”

Dickens didn’t see the laundry-woman as an imperfect specimen of universal humanity, who could become more morally respectable if she was properly instructed. Again, this is his account of what he saw, early one morning in Covent Garden, while having coffee and toast after one of his long night walks: a “man in a high and long snuff-coloured coat, and shoes, and, to the best of my belief, nothing else but a hat, who took out of his hat a large cold meat pudding; a meat pudding so large that it was a very tight fit, and brought the lining of the hat out with it”.

Dickens enjoyed human beings as he found them, unregenerate, peculiar and incorrigibly themselves. He has been often criticised because his characters are so grotesquely exaggerated. Miserly Mr Scrooge and the boozy Mrs Gamp, ever-optimistic Mr Micawber and the faded Miss Havisham are theatrical figures, it is said, rather than plausible personalities. But the stagy quality of Dickens’ characters is what makes them so humanly believable. Travelling theatres were part of the street life he had known as a child. Showing emotions being fully acted out, these street theatres revealed human beings as they feel themselves to be—creatures ruled by their sensations. It was natural for Dickens to present his characters as figures on a stage. He was himself a travelling performer, acting out his characters in readings of his books in hugely popular tours across Britain and America.

At the same time, the theatrical quality of Dickens’ fiction has a deeper source in his view of human life. One of his most striking features – and for me, one of his most attractive – is his lack of interest in grand ideas. It’s well known that he was never much engaged with politics, but it’s his equivocal attitude to religion that seems to me most telling. Certainly he invoked some of the imagery of Victorian religiosity, particularly the consoling dream of an idyllic after-life where we meet those we have loved and lost.  [......]

There are many scholarly interpretations of Dickens, but I’m inclined to think this may be the secret of his genius. He was like Shakespeare, who rather than accepting or rejecting religion simply left it on one side. The mediaeval scheme of things was a cosmic hierarchy with God at the top. There are many references to this view of things in Shakespeare, but he doesn’t use it is as a frame in which to set the events he portrays. His plays focus on the human realm, and the cosmos is hardly mentioned. Dickens does something similar, I think, but the view of the world he puts on one side is a modern one.  [.......]

Dickens never seems to me to subscribe to this picture of things. For him human life is enacted on a stage, small and brightly lit, and beyond the stage there is only an immense darkness. Some of the dramas conclude happily, as in many of Dickens’s novels. Others – like most of those he recounts in The Uncommercial Traveller – come to an end without any definite conclusion. Either way, our human dramas are more comical than they are tragic and they have no meaning beyond themselves.

For Dickens life was a theatre of the absurd, but that was no reason to be down-hearted. For him this world was enough, and he was able to find unending interest and delight in the stories that are played out on the human stage. That’s why Dickens is still so close to us, and always will be.

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80 Responses to “Why Charles Dickens still endures”
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  1. Aussie Infidel
    1 | January 2, 2014 5:15 pm

    “For Dickens life was a theatre of the absurd”, and if you want the truly absurd just look at the ship of ‘WARMIST’ fools who were rescued from their trapped ship in Antarctica today. Somehow the MSM is censoring the fact that these green ideologues of the hard left were in Antarctica to promote the lie that Antarctica is melting. Caught in a massive and embarrassing lie the Western MSM are giving them cover and hoping that Joe Public will miss the irony of this nonsense.

    To prevent tis from happening pass this onto as many blog sites as you can and ‘out ‘ these progressive green clowns.

    98 per cent of US reports don’t mention the ice-trapped passengers were global warmists
    Andrew Bolt
    JANUARY
    03

    The media here has covered up for the climate change expedition that got stuck in ice:

    Why have the ABC and Fairfax media, so keen at first to announce this expedition was to measure the extent and effects of global warming, since omitted that fact from their reports after the expedition became ice-bound?

    It’s been even worse in the US:

    The Russian ship, Akademic Shokalskiy, was stranded in the ice while on a climate change research expedition, yet nearly 98 percent of network news reports about the stranded researchers failed to mention their mission at all…

    In fact, rather than point out the mission was to find evidence of climate change, the networks often referred to the stranded people as “passengers,” “trackers” and even “tourists,” without a word about climate change or global warming…

    There was only one news story out of 41 that mentioned climate change. That was CBS “This Morning” Dec. 30. “Despite being frozen at a standstill, the team’s research on climate change and Antarctic wildlife is moving forward,” CBS News Correspondent Don Dahler said.


  2. 2 | January 2, 2014 5:18 pm

    “Great Expectations” was the worst thing I ever had to read…


  3. 3 | January 2, 2014 5:19 pm

    It has nothing to do with Dickens, but Magpul is leaving Colorado for Wyoming and Texas:

    ERIE, Colo. — The Colorado-based firearms accessories manufacturer that threatened to leave the state if more-restrictive gun legislation was passed is finally making good on its threat more than nine months after the new gun laws went into effect.

    In a press release issued on Thursday, Magpul Industries CEO Richard Fitzpatrick said his company, which currently employs 250 people in Colorado, will be relocating its shipping operations to Cheyenne, Wyo. and its company headquarters to an undisclosed location in Texas.

    The company said it is still deciding between three possible North Central Texas locations for its headquarters, and that the transition to its new home will begin as soon as a decision is made.

    Support received from governors in both states — Matt Mead in Wyoming and Rick Perry in Texas — played a big role in the selection of both sites, Magpul wrote in the release.

    “Moving operations to states that support our culture of individual liberties and personal responsibility is important,” Fitzpatrick said. “This relocation will also improve business operations and logistics as we utilize the strengths of Texas and Wyoming in our expansion.

    Take your jobs and go to the places that respect and value your business. Even if the people of Colorado throw the Democrats out of the legislature in November, those are jobs that aren’t going to come back.


  4. Aussie Infidel
    4 | January 2, 2014 5:20 pm

    … Not to mention the massive carbon footprint that ensued getting these be-clowned warmist fool out of their self inflicted fix. The cost of this rescue mission runs into the millions and these green fascists should be forced kicking and screaming to pay up.

    For too long these rent seeking limpets on the public teat have expected the taxpayers to fund their anti-scientific Gaia worshiping environmental ‘religion’ whlst throwing rocks at those same poor ripped off taxpayers.

    Get off my lawn planet warmist fools.


  5. 5 | January 2, 2014 5:20 pm

    @ Mike C.:
    Yeah, I wasn’t impressed with it, either. Much of required reading in school was “literature” that I’d have never read voluntarily.


  6. heysoos
    6 | January 2, 2014 5:21 pm

    Mike C. wrote:

    “Great Expectations” was the worst thing I ever had to read…

    agreed, never understood the appeal of Dickins


  7. 7 | January 2, 2014 5:26 pm

    @ Aussie Infidel:

    Mayor Ford is running for re-election in Toronto. @ Aussie Infidel:

    The whole situation is pure Karma.


  8. heysoos
    8 | January 2, 2014 5:29 pm

    Rodan wrote:

    @ Aussie Infidel:
    Mayor Ford is running for re-election in Toronto. @ Aussie Infidel:
    The whole situation is pure Karma.

    I get a hoot out of it..at least he seems like a jolly guy as opposed to that pimp in DC


  9. 9 | January 2, 2014 5:30 pm

    @ Iron Fist:

    The Shakespere was fine. IIRC, we had to read “Macbeth”, “Julias Ceasar” and “Merchant of Venice”

    @ heysoos:

    Compare and contrast to Twain, a contemporary. The first Twain I read was “Life on the Mississippi” in 7th grade. Wasn’t required -- the teacher just thought I would like it. That was also when I read my first Heinlein -- “Have Spacesuit, Will Travel.”


  10. lobo91
    10 | January 2, 2014 5:30 pm

    Iron Fist wrote:

    @ Mike C.:
    Yeah, I wasn’t impressed with it, either. Much of required reading in school was “literature” that I’d have never read voluntarily.

    Ever try reading Crime and Punishment?


  11. 11 | January 2, 2014 5:33 pm

    @ Mike C.:

    I keep getting double hyphens, but only on this blog, not in Hotmail, Word, or on other blogs. Is that ponderous, or what?


  12. 12 | January 2, 2014 5:34 pm

    @ lobo91:

    I did read “War and Peace” once. That was a slog…


  13. heysoos
    13 | January 2, 2014 5:37 pm

    Mike C. wrote:

    @ Iron Fist:
    The Shakespere was fine. IIRC, we had to read “Macbeth”, “Julias Ceasar” and “Merchant of Venice”
    @ heysoos:
    Compare and contrast to Twain, a contemporary. The first Twain I read was “Life on the Mississippi” in 7th grade. Wasn’t required — the teacher just thought I would like it. That was also when I read my first Heinlein — “Have Spacesuit, Will Travel.”

    Heinlein was terrific, I read everything he wrote….’The man Who Sold the Moon/the Moon Is A Harsh Mistress is still a masterpiece…Heinlein had a huge influence on me, use of force, personal responsibility, manhood, all that


  14. 14 | January 2, 2014 5:40 pm

    @ lobo91:

    That sounds like a punishment :P I actually tried reading Gulag Archipelago years ago, and I didn’t even make it through the first book. After a while rounding up people and deporting them to internal exile in concentration camps (and often de facto death camps) and it all seemed to run together. It is one of the books that absolutely convinced me that you have to have an armed population to have a free population. Disarm the bulk of the people, and you can then do anything you please to them.


  15. 15 | January 2, 2014 5:45 pm

    @ Mike C.:

    I read Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn during elementary school. Several times apiece, actually. Read War of the Worlds and Moby Dick for recreation as well. And, of course, I read most of what Heinlein produced. Good times.


  16. heysoos
    16 | January 2, 2014 5:50 pm

    Iron Fist wrote:

    @ Mike C.:
    I read Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn during elementary school. Several times apiece, actually. Read War of the Worlds and Moby Dick for recreation as well. And, of course, I read most of what Heinlein produced. Good times.

    oh yeah…my reading skills were off the charts back then (just luck)I was totally into the great European explorers, American adventures like Boone/Crockett, the opening of the West and all that history…I still read a ton


  17. 17 | January 2, 2014 5:57 pm

    @ heysoos:

    I’ve gotten out of the habit of reading anything except histories anymore. I’ve read a goo bit of the science fiction and fantasy that has been written. Most of the big names, anyway. History interests me now, but I don’t have the time that I used to, or don’t take the time.


  18. 18 | January 2, 2014 5:58 pm

    I’m surprised mo one has mentioned David Copperfield, one of Dickens’ finest and a better cast of characters one could not find. I loved that book, it’s one of those novels I wish I could forget so I could experience it for the first time all over again.


  19. heysoos
    19 | January 2, 2014 6:03 pm

    @ Iron Fist:
    I love historical fiction, but it has to be very high quality…it’s out there but you gotta look…just finished the forth book of Conn Iggulduns’ series on Genghis Kahn…awesome


  20. Guggi
    20 | January 2, 2014 6:06 pm

    Aussie Infidel wrote:

    For too long these rent seeking limpets on the public teat have expected the taxpayers to fund their anti-scientific Gaia worshiping environmental ‘religion’ whlst throwing rocks at those same poor ripped off taxpayers.

    I have to learn this new word “limpets” :-)

    limpets, limpets, limpets… I love this word


  21. eaglesoars
    21 | January 2, 2014 6:06 pm

    I don’t understand how anyone could not love Dickens. If I had to do one of those ‘which 5 books would you take to a deserted island’ things, The Pickwick Papers would be on the list. Sam is one of literature’s most hilarious characters that not even Shakespeare could have dreamed up for Midsommer Night’s Dream.

    Moby Dick is one of the few books I could never finish. Just shoot me. With a harpoon.

    Dickens left his wife and their children for a woman decades his junior. Her name was, I think, Ellen Tiernan. An aspiring actress from a family of same who never found success on the stage. She was married, also. Dickens hid her away and basically, through financial support if I understand, controlled her life. He left his own wife in humiliation and penury.

    So, I’ve always wondered how a man who could sow such emotional havoc and go to such lengths to hide it, could come up with such chrystalline characterizations of the people in his books. His own life was so filled with moral ambiguities, yet his books are black and white.


  22. eaglesoars
    22 | January 2, 2014 6:12 pm

    Aussie Infidel wrote:

    The cost of this rescue mission runs into the millions and these green fascists should be forced kicking and screaming to pay up.

    Somewhere today I read that the international law of the sea puts the responsibility for all costs on the owners of the ship that has to be rescued.

    They will be declaring bankruptcy shortly


  23. heysoos
    23 | January 2, 2014 6:13 pm

    @ eaglesoars:
    US taxpayers will pick up the tab…bet me


  24. heysoos
    24 | January 2, 2014 6:17 pm

    @ eaglesoars:
    for social commentary of our times, I like both William Wyman, and Robert Keys


  25. eaglesoars
    25 | January 2, 2014 6:24 pm

    heysoos wrote:

    @ eaglesoars:
    for social commentary of our times, I like both William Wyman, and Robert Keys

    STOP GIVING ME STUFF TO READ. YOU HAVE BURIED ME!!


  26. eaglesoars
    26 | January 2, 2014 6:25 pm

    heysoos wrote:

    @ eaglesoars:
    US taxpayers will pick up the tab…bet me

    why? They’re from New South Wales, I think. If any gov’t picks it up, it’ll be the Aussies.


  27. heysoos
    27 | January 2, 2014 6:30 pm

    @ eaglesoars:
    just seems like something BO would do…we are a very generous society


  28. heysoos
    28 | January 2, 2014 6:32 pm

    eaglesoars wrote:

    heysoos wrote:
    @ eaglesoars:
    for social commentary of our times, I like both William Wyman, and Robert Keys

    STOP GIVING ME STUFF TO READ. YOU HAVE BURIED ME!!

    Bill Wyman was a founder of the Stones and their bass player…Bobby Keys is their payroll sax player…
    neener neener


  29. eaglesoars
    29 | January 2, 2014 6:37 pm

    heysoos wrote:

    eaglesoars wrote:
    heysoos wrote:
    @ eaglesoars:
    for social commentary of our times, I like both William Wyman, and Robert Keys
    STOP GIVING ME STUFF TO READ. YOU HAVE BURIED ME!!

    Bill Wyman was a founder of the Stones and their bass player…Bobby Keys is their payroll sax player…
    neener neener

    *pppffffttttt!!**

    ok, now I’m off to -- you guessed it -- read.


  30. RIX
    30 | January 2, 2014 6:37 pm

    I will never forgive Dickens for writing Great Expectations.
    I had to submit two book reports on it in freshman lit in high school.
    The varsity football coach taught the class. Good guy, but a lousy teacher.
    Each & every paragraph had to be summarized in a paragraph, I’m serious.
    He assigned it one time over Christmas break. I had to quit playing hockey
    early to do Great Expectations for the second time!


  31. Speranza
    31 | January 2, 2014 6:38 pm

    Mike C. wrote:

    “Great Expectations” was the worst thing I ever had to read…

    Silas Marner beats it for worstest for me.


  32. Bumr50
    32 | January 2, 2014 6:40 pm

    @ RIX:

    All of our varsity coaches were history teachers.

    They’d open class, take roll, tell us to “read, take notes, and collect vocabulary” and then leave to congregate in the AD’s office to talk sports.


  33. Speranza
    33 | January 2, 2014 6:40 pm

    I was tempted to try “War and Peace” but all that Russian philosophy and Russian nicknames to remember -- no thanks.


  34. Bumr50
    34 | January 2, 2014 6:41 pm

    @ Speranza:

    Diagramming ‘The Rime of The Ancient Mariner’ sucks as well.

    F*cking albatross…


  35. RIX
    35 | January 2, 2014 6:42 pm

    Bumr50 wrote:

    @ RIX:

    All of our varsity coaches were history teachers.

    They’d open class, take roll, tell us to “read, take notes, and collect vocabulary” and then leave to congregate in the AD’s office to talk sports.

    The coaches were like that. The guy who punished us with those reports was a great guy and a war hero to boot.
    But he couldn’t teach for dust.


  36. Speranza
    36 | January 2, 2014 7:01 pm

    Great Expectations was not all that bad and it was relatively short for a Dickens novel (as was A Tale of Two Cities).


  37. brookly red
    37 | January 2, 2014 7:01 pm

    Ack! snow… I hate snow in the city.


  38. lobo91
    38 | January 2, 2014 7:07 pm

    brookly red wrote:

    Ack! snow… I hate snow in the city.

    How do you feel about having more commies in the city?

    Judge Grants Obama Admin’s Request To Release Radical Leftist Lawyer Lynne Stewart Who Was Convicted of Aiding WTC Plotter Blind Sheik…


  39. brookly red
    39 | January 2, 2014 7:11 pm

    lobo91 wrote:

    brookly red wrote:

    Ack! snow… I hate snow in the city.

    How do you feel about having more commies in the city?

    Judge Grants Obama Admin’s Request To Release Radical Leftist Lawyer Lynne Stewart Who Was Convicted of Aiding WTC Plotter Blind Sheik…

    that sucks too…


  40. heysoos
    40 | January 2, 2014 7:14 pm

    brookly red wrote:

    Ack! snow… I hate snow in the city.

    I live on a two house property, in the back…the bunkhouse…anyway the Boss lives mostly in NYC, he left LaGuardia yesterday around 9 am…fly to Midway in Chicago then to ABQ…he got here at 3am and his luggage was lost, after paying extra for a checked bag…this morning Southwest calls to say his bag was in Calgary but would be available tomorrow at the ABQ Sunport…as a bonus they would bring it out to the house (20min max)for another $30…they can run this scam via FCC regs


  41. heysoos
    41 | January 2, 2014 7:14 pm

    @ heysoos:
    FAA regs, that is


  42. brookly red
    42 | January 2, 2014 7:17 pm

    heysoos wrote:

    brookly red wrote:

    Ack! snow… I hate snow in the city.

    I live on a two house property, in the back…the bunkhouse…anyway the Boss lives mostly in NYC, he left LaGuardia yesterday around 9 am…fly to Midway in Chicago then to ABQ…he got here at 3am and his luggage was lost, after paying extra for a checked bag…this morning Southwest calls to say his bag was in Calgary but would be available tomorrow at the ABQ Sunport…as a bonus they would bring it out to the house (20min max)for another $30…they can run this scam via FCC regs

    incredible


  43. lobo91
    43 | January 2, 2014 7:18 pm

    @ brookly red:

    The article says she’s your neighbor now:

    Prosecutors say she’ll live with her son in Brooklyn.


  44. brookly red
    44 | January 2, 2014 7:22 pm

    lobo91 wrote:

    @ brookly red:

    The article says she’s your neighbor now:

    Prosecutors say she’ll live with her son in Brooklyn.

    I guess the mayor can have them over for dinner or something…


  45. brookly red
    45 | January 2, 2014 7:24 pm

    lobo91 wrote:

    @ brookly red:

    The article says she’s your neighbor now:

    Prosecutors say she’ll live with her son in Brooklyn.

    and speaking of undesirables from Brooklyn, Chuckie Shumer is conspicuously quiet these days…


  46. heysoos
    46 | January 2, 2014 7:27 pm

    @ brookly red:
    probably afraid for his miserable life…trashing 3/5 of Americans while you march off to the bank might piss someone off


  47. Speranza
    47 | January 2, 2014 7:34 pm

    Lynne Stewart is fugly!


  48. yenta-fada
    48 | January 2, 2014 7:36 pm

    Speranza wrote:

    Great Expectations was not all that bad and it was relatively short for a Dickens novel (as was A Tale of Two Cities).

    I asked myself why Dickens wrote about so many orphans as major characters. Found an interesting POV:

    Orphans, Abandonment, Self-Pity, and Fairy-Tale Plotting
    For more than a half century, students of Dickens have emphasized the crucial importance of the traumatic period in his life when his parents suddenly removed him from school and their middle-class, more-or-less genteel environment, made him live apart from the family, and forced him to work at Warren’s Shoeblacking factory and warehouse. As Walter Allen points out, this experience had crucial influence on (1) the writer’s emphasis upon orphans and abandoned children, (2) the self-pity that permeates many of his works, and (3) their fairy-tale plots:

    The blacking factory episode does not account for Dickens’s genius, but it does, I believe, explain some of the forms his genius took, and it throws light on much that is otherwise baffling both in his art and his life. It explains why we so often find at the centre of his novels the figure of the lost, persecuted, or helpless child: Oliver Twist, Little Nell, David, Paul Dombey, Pip, and their near relations, Smirke and Jo, in Bleak House. It explains, too, why their rescue, when there is a rescue, so often has the appearance of a fairy-story ending, the result of what is sometimes called wishful thinking, just as the deaths of Little Nell, Paul Dombey, and Jo are dramatizations of his own self-pity. And it explains the dominant mood in which his world is created. It was not at all one of good- humoured acceptance of things, but a mood of nightmare compounded of lurid melodrama and savage comedy, relieved from time to time by unreflecting joy in the absurd and the comic for their own sakes’


  49. Speranza
    49 | January 2, 2014 7:52 pm

    @ yenta-fada:
    He was (for me at least) the major representative of the Victorian era in Britain.


  50. heysoos
    50 | January 2, 2014 7:58 pm

    Speranza wrote:

    @ yenta-fada:
    He was (for me at least) the major representative of the Victorian era in Britain.

    he had some pretty cool whiskers too!…
    I think he would have dug the Stones


  51. yenta-fada
    51 | January 2, 2014 8:12 pm

    Speranza wrote:

    @ yenta-fada:
    He was (for me at least) the major representative of the Victorian era in Britain.

    I think so too. He made the streets of Victorian England come to life.
    So did Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, but from a completely different social class. There’s a reason we read both of these authors today. Story matters!


  52. heysoos
    52 | January 2, 2014 8:13 pm

    while you’re waiting, here’s an endless supply of American speed and power…
    http://www.theblogmocracy.com/2014/01/02/why-charles-dickens-still-endures/#comment-1296663


  53. 53 | January 2, 2014 8:37 pm

    heysoos wrote:

    while you’re waiting, here’s an endless supply of American speed and power…
    httpv://www.theblogmocracy.com/2014/01/02/why-charles-dickens-still-endures/#comment-1296663

    Your link-fu is the weakest of sauces… :evil:


  54. 54 | January 2, 2014 8:38 pm

    yenta-fada wrote:

    So did Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Oscar Wilde

    Na na nanan na… :razz:


  55. heysoos
    55 | January 2, 2014 8:41 pm

    @ doriangrey:
    don’t know why that happened…no big deal, people don’t like cars…maybe a Comet here or there


  56. 56 | January 2, 2014 8:44 pm

    heysoos wrote:

    @ doriangrey:
    don’t know why that happened…no big deal, people don’t like cars…maybe a Comet here or there

    The use of httpv:// is for Youtube video’s, not links here, that’s why.


  57. yenta-fada
    57 | January 2, 2014 8:45 pm

    doriangrey wrote:

    yenta-fada wrote:
    So did Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Oscar Wilde
    Na na nanan na…

    I like Oscar Wilde’s alleged last words. “Either this wallpaper goes, or I do.” lol


  58. heysoos
    58 | January 2, 2014 8:49 pm

    @ doriangrey:
    my left click was the wrong click


  59. heysoos
    59 | January 2, 2014 8:50 pm

    @ heysoos:
    right click…whatever


  60. Speranza
    60 | January 2, 2014 9:43 pm

    yenta-fada wrote:

    I think so too. He made the streets of Victorian England come to life.
    So did Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, but from a completely different social class. There’s a reason we read both of these authors today. Story matters!

    Dickens, Doyle, and Wilde were the three major representatives of Victorian writing (in Britain).


  61. lobo91
    61 | January 2, 2014 10:21 pm

    Hospitals Turning People With Obamacare Away Because They Can’t Tell If Their Plans Are Active…

    You know, I distinctly recall someone predicting that this would happen.

    Oh, wait…that was me.
    //


  62. brookly red
    62 | January 2, 2014 10:23 pm

    lobo91 wrote:

    Hospitals Turning People With Obamacare Away Because They Can’t Tell If Their Plans Are Active…

    You know, I distinctly recall someone predicting that this would happen.

    Oh, wait…that was me.
    //

    it is a rat fest, plain and simple…


  63. lobo91
    63 | January 2, 2014 10:33 pm

    @ brookly red:

    It’s unlikely that a valid insurance card would have changed Galvez’ fortunes, however.

    Her Carefirst plan, identified on the Obamacare website as BlueChoice Plus Bronze, carries a $5,500 per-person deductible for 2014 – an amount she would have to pay out-of-pocket before her coverage would apply to medical expenses.

    Looks like the lofos are about to learn what a deductible is.


  64. 64 | January 2, 2014 10:34 pm

    Speranza wrote:

    Dickens, Doyle, and Wilde were the three major representatives of Victorian writing (in Britain).

    You mean D.H. Lawrence isn’t part of this bunch? :evil:


  65. brookly red
    65 | January 2, 2014 10:44 pm

    lobo91 wrote:

    @ brookly red:

    It’s unlikely that a valid insurance card would have changed Galvez’ fortunes, however.

    Her Carefirst plan, identified on the Obamacare website as BlueChoice Plus Bronze, carries a $5,500 per-person deductible for 2014 – an amount she would have to pay out-of-pocket before her coverage would apply to medical expenses.

    Looks like the lofos are about to learn what a deductible is.

    I would make a good math question for a school exam… if Debbie’s deductible is $5,500/yr and her plan costs $3,600/yr how much did that $150 blood test actually cost Debbie?


  66. 66 | January 2, 2014 10:49 pm

    brookly red wrote:

    how much did that $150 blood test actually cost Debbie?

    About $750.00 under Obamacare… :twisted:


  67. brookly red
    67 | January 2, 2014 10:51 pm

    doriangrey wrote:

    brookly red wrote:

    how much did that $150 blood test actually cost Debbie?

    About $750.00 under Obamacare…

    ooops! back to the 5th grade for you! $150… it’s applied to the deductible :)


  68. lobo91
    68 | January 2, 2014 10:52 pm

    @ brookly red:

    Plus the premiums she’s paid up to that point


  69. brookly red
    69 | January 2, 2014 10:53 pm

    lobo91 wrote:

    @ brookly red:

    Plus the premiums she’s paid up to that point

    what premiums? Obama said it would be free…


  70. brookly red
    70 | January 2, 2014 10:55 pm

    @ doriangrey:
    @ lobo91:

    but seriously anyone who signed up for that should get the free contraception and let’s hope they use it…


  71. darkwords
    71 | January 2, 2014 10:56 pm

    @ 62 brookly red: I am not sure why the media isn’t summing up Obamacare for the middle class. Most likely you will be paying an extra $200 out of your paycheck monthly. If lucky. That is the price of voting for Obama or accepting his foolery without question. It’s called “Hope and Change”. A sucker born every minute.


  72. 72 | January 2, 2014 11:01 pm

    brookly red wrote:

    doriangrey wrote:
    brookly red wrote:
    how much did that $150 blood test actually cost Debbie?
    About $750.00 under Obamacare…

    ooops! back to the 5th grade for you! $150… it’s applied to the deductible

    Wrong… you obviously have not been paying attention. There will be the $150.00 for the lab work, then another $300.0 for the doctors consultation, then $50.00 for office paper work, then $200.00 more for Taxes. And finally $50.00 in extra gas money, because her doctor is no longer closer than 100 miles away.


  73. brookly red
    73 | January 2, 2014 11:04 pm

    doriangrey wrote:

    brookly red wrote:

    doriangrey wrote:
    brookly red wrote:
    how much did that $150 blood test actually cost Debbie?
    About $750.00 under Obamacare…

    ooops! back to the 5th grade for you! $150… it’s applied to the deductible

    Wrong… you obviously have not been paying attention. There will be the $150.00 for the lab work, then another $300.0 for the doctors consultation, then $50.00 for office paper work, then $200.00 more for Taxes. And finally $50.00 in extra gas money, because her doctor is no longer closer than 100 miles away.

    well actually Debbie never got the blood test… she couldn’t find a lab that accepted her insurance. Poor Debbie…


  74. lobo91
    74 | January 2, 2014 11:06 pm

    @ darkwords:

    I am not sure why the media isn’t summing up Obamacare for the middle class.

    Why would they want to do that? They’re all one big commie family, after all.


  75. 75 | January 2, 2014 11:06 pm

    brookly red wrote:

    doriangrey wrote:
    brookly red wrote:
    doriangrey wrote:
    brookly red wrote:
    how much did that $150 blood test actually cost Debbie?
    About $750.00 under Obamacare…
    ooops! back to the 5th grade for you! $150… it’s applied to the deductible
    Wrong… you obviously have not been paying attention. There will be the $150.00 for the lab work, then another $300.0 for the doctors consultation, then $50.00 for office paper work, then $200.00 more for Taxes. And finally $50.00 in extra gas money, because her doctor is no longer closer than 100 miles away.

    well actually Debbie never got the blood test… she couldn’t find a lab that accepted her insurance. Poor Debbie…

    Debbie voted for Obama… Twice… She was just getting what she wanted… :twisted:


  76. 76 | January 2, 2014 11:08 pm

    doriangrey wrote:

    well actually Debbie never got the blood test… she couldn’t find a lab that accepted her insurance. Poor Debbie…

    Debbie voted for Obama… Twice… She was just getting what she wanted… :twisted:

    Life is seldom fair… But once in a while it is… :evil:


  77. brookly red
    77 | January 2, 2014 11:09 pm

    doriangrey wrote:

    doriangrey wrote:

    well actually Debbie never got the blood test… she couldn’t find a lab that accepted her insurance. Poor Debbie…

    Debbie voted for Obama… Twice… She was just getting what she wanted…

    Life is seldom fair… But once in a while it is…

    life is always fair… you have to wait for the test results :)


  78. 78 | January 2, 2014 11:16 pm

    brookly red wrote:

    doriangrey wrote:
    doriangrey wrote:
    well actually Debbie never got the blood test… she couldn’t find a lab that accepted her insurance. Poor Debbie…
    Debbie voted for Obama… Twice… She was just getting what she wanted…
    Life is seldom fair… But once in a while it is…

    life is always fair… you have to wait for the test results

    Well, the test results are in now, and Debbie tested positive for terminal stupidity…


  79. brookly red
    79 | January 2, 2014 11:17 pm

    doriangrey wrote:

    brookly red wrote:

    doriangrey wrote:
    doriangrey wrote:
    well actually Debbie never got the blood test… she couldn’t find a lab that accepted her insurance. Poor Debbie…
    Debbie voted for Obama… Twice… She was just getting what she wanted…
    Life is seldom fair… But once in a while it is…

    life is always fair… you have to wait for the test results

    Well, the test results are in now, and Debbie tested positive for terminal stupidity…

    it’s a pre-existing condition…


  80. Speranza
    80 | January 2, 2014 11:20 pm

    Macker wrote:

    Dickens, Doyle, and Wilde were the three major representatives of Victorian writing (in Britain).

    You mean D.H. Lawrence isn’t part of this bunch?

    Lawrence was Edwardian era not Victorian.


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